Cherokee National Holiday Car Show returns Sept. 3

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/23/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Casino Tahlequah will host the 14th annual Cherokee National Holiday Car Show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sept. 3.

The all-ages car show is free to the public. At 2 p.m. is when judges will award trophies in nearly 40 categories.

“This is always a fun event to host because there is so much excitement about all the great classic cars that overflow our parking lot,” Cherokee Casino Tahlequah General Manager Rod Fourkiller said. “It’s really impressive how good the vehicles are that enter the car show. It makes it a tough decision for the judges, and the car enthusiasts can’t get enough of them. If you love cars, you definitely need to be here that Sunday.”

Categories include stock and modified cars and trucks for each decade, beginning pre-1935 through 2000s. Other categories include Camaro, Mustang, Chevelle and Corvette from multiple decades, and motorcycles with categories for pre-1979 and post-1980.

In addition to category awards, recognition will be given to Best of Show, Best Paint, Best Interior, Chief’s Choice, Speaker’s Choice, Council’s Choice, Casino’s Choice and the Chamber of Commerce’s Choice.

CN Environmental Programs gets $300K EPA grant

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/23/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to a Cherokee Nation Communications press release, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently awarded the tribe’s Environmental Programs a $300,000 grant to create a national tribal mentoring program that focuses on the development and reporting of water quality assessments.

The Environmental Information Exchange Network Grant will provide the CN with $100,000 per year for three years, the release states. It also states that in return CN Environmental Programs staff would help other tribes use an EPA reporting tool called Assessment, Total Maximum Daily Load Tracking and Implementation System or ATTAINS.

The online system allows the EPA states, territories, tribes and other partners to submit water quality data using an integrated reporting process, according to the release.

“Over the past year, we have been active within our 14 counties and across Indian Country when it comes to the conservation of water,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “Now, with this grant from the Environmental Protection Agency, a new door has been opened for our environmental programs. Tribes across the country will have a strong mentor and partner in the Cherokee Nation. Our environmental programs will play a vital role in educational efforts and outreach to tribal water programs.”

The release states that CN Environmental Programs staff members will develop a webpage to serve as a resource for tribes that want to learn more about ATTAINS. According to the release, CN workers will also create and coordinate workshops, trainings and meetings taught by the EPA and tribal mentors and publish a newsletter to showcase the ATTAINS reporting tool for tribal water programs.

Clark, Tillis and Bogguss bring trio of hits to Hard Rock

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/23/2017 08:00 AM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $29 and go on sale Aug. 31.

The trio will showcase dozens of songs as they share the stage, bringing together decades of hits.
Clark is an eight-time Canadian Country Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year and has earned CCMA Female Vocalist of the Year five times. She is the only Canadian female artist to be a member of the Grand Ole Opry.

Clark has sold more than 5 million albums and is known for dozens of singles, including “Better Things To Do,” “Poor Poor Pitiful Me,” “Girls Lie Too” and “I Just Wanna Be Mad.”

Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY
Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY

Cherokee Phoenix Radio August 20, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/22/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We feature Toonoowee Baskets owners who are connecting with their culture through basketry.
  • Also, we have a story on Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn who own The Speckled Hen Antique Flea Market in Tahlequah.
  • ...plus much more.
http://cherokee.org/About-The-Nation/National-Holiday

Byrd builds on 18-year legacy of serving CN

BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
08/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With 18 years of experience serving the Cherokee people, Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd looks forward to serving another four years as the representative for Dist. 2, which consists of most of northern Cherokee County.

“I love serving the Cherokee people. They’ve got somebody that’s going to work for them again for the next four years, and I’m really looking forward to that,” said Byrd.

Originally from Belfonte/Nicut, Byrd was the youngest Cherokee Nation legislator to be elected. He served on the Tribal Council from 1987-95, followed by term as principal chief from 1995-99. In January 2012, he won a special election to replace Bill John Baker on the Tribal Council. Baker had taken office as the principal chief on Oct. 19, 2011, after a contentious and lengthy principal chief’s race against incumbent Chad Smith.

In 2013, Byrd was re-elected to serve his first full term under the tribe’s 1999 Constitution, which limits elected officials to two consecutive four-year terms before having to sit out a term. He was also named speaker of the Tribal Council in 2015 after then-Speaker Tina Glory Jordan termed out.

When he first ran for office in 1987, Byrd said he felt the need to help the Cherokee people with the issues they were facing.
Joe Byrd
Joe Byrd

Pigeon crowned 2017-18 Junior Miss Cherokee

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/22/2017 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High School senior Danya Pigeon, of Hulbert, on Aug. 19 was crowned the 2017-18 Junior Miss Cherokee during the 26th annual leadership competition at the Tahlequah Armory Municipal Center.

For the next year, Pigeon will act as a goodwill ambassador for the tribe, promoting the government, language, history and traditions of the Cherokee people.

Three teens competed for the honor in three categories: a cultural presentation, an impromptu question-and-answer and a speech on their respective platform.

Pigeon, 18, earned her crown and sash after giving a special presentation on Sequoyah and the Cherokee syllabary, giving her opinion on connecting citizens inside and outside of the tribal jurisdiction and speaking on her platform, alcohol abuse.

“It has been a dream of mine to be Junior Miss Cherokee, and I would like to thank God for giving me this opportunity to serve the Cherokee Nation,” Pigeon said.
2017-18 Junior Miss Cherokee Danya Pigeon receiving her crown from 2016-17 Junior Miss Cherokee Lauryn Skye McCoy. COURTESY
2017-18 Junior Miss Cherokee Danya Pigeon receiving her crown from 2016-17 Junior Miss Cherokee Lauryn Skye McCoy. COURTESY
https://www.facebook.com/ScissorCutArtByTana/

Buzzard begins 3rd term on Tribal Council

BY LINDSEY BARK
News Writer
08/22/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Harley Buzzard is beginning his third Tribal Council term. It’s his second for Dist. 10, which consists of northern Delaware County and parts of Ottawa and Mayes counties. Prior to that he served from 2007-11 for the former Dist. 2, which consisted of Delaware County and part of Ottawa County.

Buzzard worked for the Cherokee Nation for 24 years before running for Tribal Council in 2007. After a term serving Dist. 2, he was elected for Dist. 10 in 2013. He ran again this year because he said there was more he could help improve such as agriculture, sanitation and education. “There was just some things I felt I wanted to be involved with, see if I could help get it done.”

He said he’s stressed agriculture’s importance with the hope that Cherokee children would learn how to grow their food. “Now we’re just eating fast foods and pre-cooked meals and things like that, and our children don’t know about gardening. I’d like to get it to the point where we could raise enough to supply all our families that want those fresh vegetables, but also on a commercial basis too (by) putting it into our casinos and stuff like that.”

Buzzard said he would also like to see improvements with roads and water lines in his district.

He said he has much experience with water and sanitation engineering and that he sees a lot of Cherokee families that do not have inside plumbing and water. A water line extension for rural water is something he would like to work on, he said.
Harley Buzzard
Harley Buzzard

Editorial Board sets in-person meeting for Aug. 31

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/21/2017 04:00 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will meet at 10 a.m. on Aug. 31 in the Tribal Services Conference room located at the W. W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah.

In Person: 17675 S Muskogee Ave, Tahlequah, OK 74464. Cherokee Nation Tribal Complex, Tribal Services Conference Room

Conference Call: 1-866-210-1669

Code: 4183136#

Agenda Items:

CN employees, citizens observe solar eclipse

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
08/21/2017 03:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation hosted a “Solar Eclipse Watch Party” for its employees and citizens on Aug. 21 at the One Fire Field, west of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex.

The eclipse began at 11:45 a.m. CST, peaked around 1:10 p.m. and ended about 2:40 p.m.

According to NASA’s website, all of North America was able to observe the sun’s eclipse. The totality path, where the moon completely covered the sun and its tenuous atmosphere stretched from Oregon to South Carolina. Observers outside this path, as in the case of the CN, saw a partial eclipse where the moon covered part of the sun. Locally it was estimated at about 90 percent coverage.

CN Communications officials handed out 1,000 pairs of NASA-approved solar eclipse viewing glasses to employees and visitors.

“A solar eclipse is an extremely rare event. We wanted our employees to witness and enjoy this rare occasion safely,” Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said.
The Burrow family, of San Antonio, drove more than 500 miles to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, to witness the 2017 solar eclipse on Aug. 21 within the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation employees Callie Benoit, left, Cora Lathrop and Lula Elk use protective eyewear to observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the tribe’s One Fire Field in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Burrow family, of San Antonio, drove more than 500 miles to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, to witness the 2017 solar eclipse on Aug. 21 within the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Culture

Cherokee Phoenix calls for 2018 homecoming T-shirt concepts
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
08/20/2017 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With its 2017 annual homecoming T-shirt now for sale, the Cherokee Phoenix is calling for Cherokee artists to submit design concepts for the news organization’s 2018 T-shirt.

In 2016, the Cherokee Phoenix staff introduced a T-shirt to differ from the tribe’s Cherokee National Holiday T-shirt. Phoenix staff members contracted with artist Buffalo Gouge for the shirt’s initial design.

For this year’s homecoming shirt, Phoenix staff members selected Daniel HorseChief’s concept out of approximately 10 designs from artists. The Cherokee Phoenix then contracted with HorseChief to create the 2017 shirt.

HorseChief said his concept comes from a four-panel painting that features Selu, the Corn Mother in Cherokee lore.

The image shows the bust of Selu, who is looking down into a Southeastern art pattern. Behind her on the left side are seven ears of corn with water under it. Behind her on the opposite side is a phoenix with fire below it. Above the phoenix is the Cherokee seven-pointed star. Above the image, written in Cherokee, are the words “Cherokee Phoenix.” Below the image, in English, is “2017 CHEROKEE HOMECOMING.”

The limited-quantity, black shirts are short-sleeved, ranging in sizes small to 3XL and sell for $20 plus tax. The shirts are available at the Cherokee Phoenix office in Room 231 of the Annex Building (Old Motel) on the Tribal Complex. For more information, call 918-453-5269.

They are also available at the Cherokee Nation Gift Shop, als0 on the Tribal Complex, or online at http://cherokeegiftshop.com.

Phoenix staff members will also have shirts available at the Cherokee Phoenix booths at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex and Capital Square during the Cherokee National Holiday in September.

The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting concept ideas from artists who are Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band citizens until midnight on Jan. 1. Artist can email detailed concepts to travis-snell@cherokee.org.

For artists contemplating submitting design ideas, please note that if your concept is chosen and you sign a contract, the Cherokee Phoenix will own the artwork because we consider it a commissioned piece. As for what Phoenix staff members look for in a concept, we ask that artists “think Cherokee National Holiday” and include a phoenix.

Education

NSU Alumni Association honors 2 Cherokees
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/14/2017 12:00 PM
TAHELQUAH, Okla. – The Northeastern State University Alumni Association board of directors has chosen two Cherokee Nation citizens as 2017 honorees of the university’s Distinguished Alumnus awards.

CN Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and Julie Erb-Alvarez were selected as distinguished alumni and will receive their honors on Sept. 29 at the Alumni Association Honors Dinner and again Sept. 30 at the homecoming Emerald Ball. Both events are open to the public.

Awards are presented annually to NSU alumni who, through personal achievement and service, have brought honor and distinction to both themselves and the university, a NSU release states.

Crittenden graduated from NSU in 1974 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting and business administration. Crittenden has previously served on the Tribal Council, as the Eastern Oklahoma vice president for the National Congress of American Indians and as a U.S. Postal Service postmaster. He is also a Navy veteran.

“It is an honor to receive this award from Northeastern State University,” Crittenden said. “It has been 43 years since I graduated from the university, and I still wear my gold NSU class ring every single day. I was an atypical college student, returning to school after serving in the U.S. Navy during Vietnam. However, I was blessed to receive an excellent education at NSU, and what I learned there helped guide me on a long career of public service.”

Crittenden has given back to NSU by supporting the tribe’s efforts to restore Seminary Hall and install modern classroom technologies. He also offers support and advice to youth in their pursuit of higher-education opportunities.

“I am proud to say I am an alum of a school that is so committed to Native students and developing leaders for Indian Country,” Crittenden said. “Cherokee Nation and NSU have established one of the most unique and successful collaborations between a tribal government and public higher education institution.”

NSU President Dr. Steve Turner said Crittenden was extraordinarily qualified to be recognized as a distinguished alumnus.

“His career path is highlighted by many years of service to the Cherokee Nation and to our country. I am so excited for Joe and his family and am honored to call him friend,” Turner said.

Erb-Alvarez is a distinguished epidemiologist and chief of patient recruitment for the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute who graduated from NSU in 1993 with a bachelor’s degree in health and human performance.

She continued her education at the University of Oklahoma, earning a master’s degree in epidemiology. She has served as an epidemiologist for the Oklahoma Tribal Epidemiology Center, the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Public Health, Ministry of Health in the Republic of Palau.

Erb-Alvarez was commissioned into the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps in 2010 and was deployed to Monrovia, Liberia in response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa in 2014-15. She is a life member of the NSU Alumni Association.

“I was truly honored when I received the call from NSU President Steve Turner. I was completely surprised and really excited when he told me I had been selected as one of the 2017 Distinguished Alumni. And then when explained who the other honorees were, it instilled another sense of pride and emotion. I am deeply grateful for this honor, and am completely humbled with the company I now keep, with those who are also being honored this year and those who have been honored in the past,” she said. “I look forward to NSU Homecoming Weekend in September when I can come back to my beloved alma mater and experience NSU all these many years later. I can’t wait to talk with students, educators, other professionals and friends – those who helped build my education – and share my post-graduation career and life experiences. I want them all to know and understand how much NSU has given me. I had a very solid foundation thanks to my years at NSU. It was easy for me to find my way and excel after an educational experience like that. Both of my parents are NSU graduates, and I was born while my parents were students and living at NSU married student housing. I have a long, long and wonderful history with NSU. The fact that NSU began as a Cherokee Seminary gives it all the more meaning to me as a Cherokee citizen.”

Turner said Erb-Alvarez has amassed an outstanding list of accomplishments since her time at NSU.”

“Her commitment to preserving the health of the nation and serving others through the National Institute of Health and the United States Public Health Service is admirable and makes her more than deserving of this honor,” he said.

Council

Hargis considers it an honor to serve others
BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
08/21/2017 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Frankie Hargis looks to serve the Cherokee people of Dist. 7 for another term after being re-elected in June. Hargis was initially elected on Dec. 2, 2011, to replace S. Joe Crittenden, who resigned after being elected deputy chief. She served her first full term after being elected in 2013.

“I chose to run for re-election because I have enjoyed serving the Cherokee people. There are projects that I want to see completed, and there is still work to be done.” She said.

Raised in Stillwell, Hargis graduated from Stilwell High School and then from Northeastern Sate University with a bachelor’s degree in education. She has worked for the Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Enterprises in several capacities.

“I was raised in Adair County, raised my children here and want only the best for Cherokees in this district. We have made great strides in several areas, including health care, education and housing,” she said.

Before taking a seat on the Tribal Council, Hargis had never planned to run for tribal office. However, when she saw that the people of Adair County needed someone to be a voice she made the decision to “step up” and be that voice.

“I saw a need, and I knew it was not right to sit back and hope someone else would take care of things,” Hargis said. “I was taught the importance of caring for others and that the right thing to do when you see a need is to step up and do what you can.”

During her time as a legislator, she has worked with the Tribal Council to complete projects to improve the well-being of Dist. 7 and its constituents, including getting $80,000 to establish a shelter in Stilwell for survivors of domestic violence, $4.2 million to build a new child development center in Stilwell, $11 million for the expansion of the Wilma P. Mankiller Clinic as well as $1 million for roads and bridges in Adair County.

Hargis said for this term she would continue to support the Cherokee people as she always has, but with one major goal in mind.

“I will continue to support health care, education, job development and housing,” she said. “One goal I do have is for the Housing Authority (of the Cherokee Nation) to build a housing addition in Adair County in the near future for those citizens who are on the New Home Construction Program list but do not have their own land.”

She added that she is honored to serve a second term. “It is my opinion, we should always consider it an honor to serve others. I count it a blessing to continue as District 7 Tribal Council representative.”

Health

Casting for Recovery to hold retreat for Native women with breast cancer
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/08/2017 04:00 PM
AUSTIN, Texas – Casting for Recovery, a national nonprofit organization providing free fly fishing retreats for women with breast cancer, will hold a retreat exclusively for Native American women in October in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

Set for Oct. 13-15, Native American women who reside in Oklahoma and have received a breast cancer diagnosis are eligible to apply. Up to 14 women will be randomly selected to attend the retreat at no cost. Meals, lodging, equipment and supplies will be provided for each participant. The deadline to apply is Aug. 11.

CfR officials said Native American women face numerous cultural and economic barriers to cancer care. By providing support, education and resources, CfR officials said they hope to improve the quality of life for Native American women, creating a ripple effect for health in their communities.

CfR officials said the program empowers women with educational resources, a new support group and fly fishing, which promotes emotional, physical, and spiritual healing. For more information or to apply for this retreat, visit https://castingforrecovery.org/breast-cancer-retreats/arkansas-oklahoma/ or call Susan Gaetz at 512-940-0246.

CfR is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit founded in 1996 featuring a program that combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of fly fishing. Officials said its retreats offer opportunities for women to find inspiration, discover renewed energy for life and experience healing connections with other women and nature. CfR’s retreats are open to women of all ages, all stages of breast cancer treatment and recovery, and are free to participants.

?For more information, visit https://castingforrecovery.org.

Opinion

OPINION: Environmental efforts ensure fresh water, better future
BY BILL JOHN BAKER
Principal Chief
08/01/2017 12:00 PM
Protecting the environment and practicing conservation principles have always been important to the Cherokee people. It’s fitting that the 65th annual Cherokee National Holiday theme is “Water is Sacred.” It is something that resonates with all of us as Cherokees. Water is sacred to our people and has been forever. Water has been part of our ceremonies. Water has sustained us with food and an ability to grow our crops. Water is something we share and celebrate with our families. Our close relationship to water, the land and the traditional knowledge about our natural surroundings has always been part of who we are. Cherokee values and these historic ideas, established over multiple generations, about ecological preservation benefit all of northeast Oklahoma.

Over the past year, Cherokee Nation has put a focused effort to preserve water rights and natural resources. We have been active within our 14 counties and across Indian Country when it comes to conservation of our water. CN established the office of the secretary of Natural Resources to address a various environmental issues. Secretary Sara Hill oversees the programs and services related to preservation and conservation of our air, land, water and animal and plant life.

As a tribal government, and as Cherokees, we have a responsibility to protect the water we drink, the air we breathe, and the land we live on. We will unequivocally fight for the rights of our people to live safely in their communities. We have a right and a responsibility to protect our water. It is our duty for the next seven generations.

An excellent example of our renewed conservation efforts was a recent federal court decision naming CN the court-appointed steward of restoration efforts of Saline Creek in Mayes County. David Benham, a CN citizen originally from the Kenwood area and a property owner along the creek bank, personally sued Ozark Materials River Rock for the extreme damage done to the water. The company, which will pay for the restoration effort, mined at the foot of the creek, removing the gravel at the lower reaches. Erosion upstream redirected the creek and eroded vegetation, which in turn increased stream temperature and algae growth.

It is appropriate that the court appointed CN as the steward of Saline Creek and will manage the recovery of the damaged areas and easement. Saline Creek has spiritual as well as historical significance to CN citizens in that area. Additionally, it is one of the most beautiful creeks in northeast Oklahoma.

Earlier this year, Secretary Hill’s team defended the Arkansas and Illinois rivers, as CN played a critical role in preventing Sequoyah Fuels Corporation from disposing radioactive waste near important waterways. We are working with the company to find appropriate off-site disposal.

Recently, the tribe also earned a $75,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency that will help support the critical environmental work that we do at the local level. The partnership between CN and the EPA benefits our people, our environmental endeavors, and the health and beauty of northeast Oklahoma.

Together with the EPA’s federal dollars, we can sustain the environmental protection efforts that preserve our clean air, healthy land and fresh water. The CN created a five-person board, the Environmental Protection Commission, which works with Secretary Hill to help the tribe administer its environmental programs and develop community and education programs.

The CN is also a founding member of the Inter-Tribal Environmental Council, an organization that helps protect the health of Native Americans, tribal natural resources and the environment. This tribal organization was created to provide support, technical assistance, program development and training to member tribes nationwide. Today, almost 50 tribal governments are members and share best practices.

Our tribal government strives to build a better future for our people and fights for the rights of our people to live safely in their communities. Protecting the environment through CN’s active and progressive conservation programs is one of the most important things we can do to ensure we achieve that goal.

People

Flag football combine has large Native turnout
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
08/17/2017 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Approximately 70 youths in first through fourth grades were athletically evaluated on Aug. 12 at the Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah’s flag football combine held on the infield of Tahlequah High School’s track.

Testing included speed evaluations, route running as well as passing and catching a football.

Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah CEO Dennis Kelley said the combine testing is crucial to selecting evenly matched league teams.

“It’s for all kids across the county. You don’t have to be a Boys & Girls Club member. We have 13 clubs throughout Cherokee County in almost every school except Hulbert and Shady Grove. Our club stats for Cherokee County show we’re at about 70 percent Native American. So anyone who wants to sign up can. Boys and girls are welcome.”

Kelley said the fee for joining is $45.

“We try to keep it as low as we can. Plus, if someone can’t afford it, we try to scholarship them in. Cherokee Nation helps us with some money throughout the year, so we try to use that money for scholarships for kids who can’t afford to pay,” he said.

Cherokee Nation citizen Julie Deerinwater Anderson said bringing her son to try out was a mutual decision.

“I brought my son out today because he was very interested in flag football. It’s an opportunity for him to be a part of a team. Plus it’s his first year, so he can learn some skills without the risk of tackle football,” she said. “It’s healthy and it’s outside. It’s important to me that my son has healthy options.”

For more information, call the Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah at 918-456-6888.
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