July 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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July 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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June 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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June 5, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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Monday, July 22, 2019
July 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
July 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
June 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
June 5, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
Catastrophic flooding in May and June impacted much of the tribe’s 14-county area, home to thousands of Cherokee families.
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Nikki Baker-Limore
This fall the tribe will also open its 469,000-square-foot outpatient health center on the W.W. Hastings Hospital campus.
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From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Victoria Vazquez, Air Force veteran Conn Davis, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Dick Lay. The tribe recognized Davis for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Victoria Vazquez, Army veteran James Smith, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Dick Lay. The tribe recognized Smith for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Army veteran Roy Brown, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Canaan Duncan. The tribe recognized Brown for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield, Navy veteran Jack Buffington, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Mary Baker Shaw. The tribe recognized Buffington for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
The tribe honors two from the Army, one from the Navy and one from the Air Force.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Gov. Kevin Stitt says the Federal Emergency Management Agency has approved disaster assistance for 41 Oklahoma counties as a result of spring flooding and severe weather in the state.

The storms produced historic flooding throughout the northern half of the state and spawned a tornado that struck near Tulsa International Airport on May 21.

Stitt announced the approval Tuesday, saying it makes federal funding available for cities, counties, rural electric cooperatives and the state to repair infrastructure and other costs associated with the storm response.

Stitt said damage estimates from the storms stand at $22 million.

The counties approved for assistance extend from west to east across the northern half of Oklahoma and Stitt said assistance was also approved for individuals and business owners in 27 of the counties.
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TULSA, Okla. (AP) – The leaders of five of Oklahoma’s most powerful tribal nations have approved a resolution denouncing the new Republican governor’s plan to force negotiations for a bigger slice of revenue from Oklahoma’s tribal casinos.

The Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes approved the resolution July 12 during a meeting in Tulsa. The Oklahoma-based Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole nations represent about 750,000 Native Americans across the country.

In an editorial published this week, Gov. Kevin Stitt said the existing compacts should be reevaluated now that the gambling industry has matured in Oklahoma. In a statement, Stitt said he’s been clear since his campaign that he’d seek a “fair-market deal” from the tribes.

Tribal leaders and the governor disagree over what triggers a 15-year renewal of the compacts.
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Cherokee Nation citizens living in Benton, Crawford, Sebastian and Washington counties could be eligible.
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TULSA (AP) – The number of Oklahoma earthquakes registering a magnitude of 3.0 or greater is on pace to decline for the fourth straight year after state regulators began directing oil and natural gas producers to close some wells and reduce injection volumes in others.

The Tulsa World reports that 27 earthquakes have been recorded in 2019, down from 97 by this time in 2018 and 144 in the first half of 2017.

Oklahoma's Corporation Commission began imposing volume limits on oil companies' disposal wells in mid-2015, after the quakes were linked to the underground injection of wastewater.

Numerous lawsuits have been filed in recent years accusing the oil companies of triggering earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey has calculated Oklahoma's short-term hazard levels to be similar to active regions in California.
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Eligible applicants must be citizens of a federally recognized tribe and be residents in the Cherokee Nation jurisdictional area.
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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Dozens of tribes now have direct access to the FBI’s National Sex Offender Registry as tribal authorities try to combat high rates of sexual violence, federal officials said July 11.

The Justice Department announced an automated system that links a sex offender registry for tribes with the FBI’s database, saying it will make information sharing seamless.
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The opioid prescription rate for Cherokee County was 21 percent higher than the state rate.
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Tangy Acorn finishes placing a Cherokee speaker’s medallion on her father, Richard Acorn, during the Cherokee Speaker Roll book-signing event on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Names of Cherokee speakers from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are also a part of the Cherokee Speaker Roll book, which was recently taken to the EBCI in North Carolina. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Larry Nofire signs the Cherokee Speaker Roll book on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Larry Nofire signs his name to the Cherokee Speaker Roll book on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. Nofire is a first-language Cherokee speaker. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
After signing the Cherokee Speaker Roll, first-language Cherokee speakers are presented medallions stamped with the image of Sequoyah. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
First-language Cherokee speakers visit the Rocky Mountain Community to sign the Cherokee Speaker Roll.
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