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Sunday, May 26, 2019
May 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
May 1, 2019 Election Guide Issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
April 15, 2019 Election Guide Issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
Ophelia Watahomigie-Corliss, a citizen of the Havasupai Tribal Council, at Red Butte, stands at a site that the Havasupai consider sacred about 15 miles south of Tusayan, Arizona. Native American tribes are pushing the federal government to give them priority when it issues licenses that could expand internet coverage in their communities. Tribes in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Washington, Idaho and others in Arizona also are pressing the FCC for a priority filing window. On the Havasupai Tribal Council, Watahomigie-Corliss is dubbed the telecommunications member. AMY MARTIN/VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tribes say large telecommunications companies are unwilling to expand to tribal lands because of the cost.
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The June 6 at the Cherokee Nation Office of Veterans Affairs is to identify and assist veterans who may have presumptive disabilities and who might be eligible for a VA pension.
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In 1979, the Interior approved a law in the tribe’s constitution that restricts citizenship eligibility to those with proof of Creek lineage.
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Dist. 3 Tribal Councilor David Walkingstick fills out paperwork declaring his candidacy for principal chief on Feb. 4 at the Election Commission Office in Tahlequah. He was disqualified by the EC on May 17 for campaign violations. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Supreme Court officials say a decision would likely be rendered no earlier than noon Tuesday, the deadline for Walkingstick’s attorneys to file a “proposed finding of facts” statement.
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Amanda Ray
Sequoyah High School teacher Amanda Ray hopes to teach students that studying Shakespeare is important.
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Keith Harper
Late last week, the Election Commission of the Cherokee Nation in a unanimous decision disqualified David Walkingstick for the upcoming principal chief election because of several seemingly blatant violations of the Cherokee Nation’s election laws. Of greatest concern, the commission’s decision cites overwhelming evidence that in coordination with Walkingstick, a group called Cherokees for Change LLC was a means of utilizing what is commonly referred to as “dark money” in support of Walkingstick. Central to this scheme is reportedly a close associate of Walkingstick, one Rusty Appleton who heads Cherokees for Change LLC.

Walkingstick’s baffling defense seems to be that the U.S. Supreme Court’s heavily-criticized decision in Citizen’s United v. SEC bars the Cherokee Nation from preventing the use of dark money in Cherokee Nation elections. As a matter of settled law, this argument is absurd. Here’s why.
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TAHLEQUAH – City officials are issuing a beach closure for all access points of Town Branch Creek. Signage is posted at its two most frequented recreational areas in Sequoyah and Felts parks because of high levels of E. coli.

Numbers tested this week at both locations were between 249 and 435 E. coli colony forming units, according to Cherokee Nation testing.
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Jade Day
The National Organization for Rare Disorders is a nonprofit organization committed to identifying and treating rare diseases and disorders.
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Dr. Roger Montgomery says a recall of three types of Losartan tablets coming from producers in India affects less than 100 Cherokee Nation patients.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Tad Dunham, right, with his wife Linda at their homestead in Eucha, hold a plate of morel mushrooms found on their property. Morels are a springtime favorite among Cherokees in northeast Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Almost blending into their surroundings, morel mushrooms are found on the forest floor and sprout when warmer temperatures enable them to grow, most likely at the beginning of April. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Tad Dunham picks a morel mushroom on his property in Eucha. He tears the mushroom from its stem but leaving some to grow for next year. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Picked and cleaned morel mushrooms are ready to be prepped and cooked. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
As shown, morel mushrooms can be cooked in different ways. Cherokee Nation citizen Tad Dunham cooks his mushrooms in a smothered meat dish using round steak, sautéed morels, peppers, onions with golden mushroom soup and brown gravy mix. He also deep fries them using flour, salt and pepper. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Morels are mushrooms that grow in the spring and are well-liked by Cherokees.
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Jodie Fishinghawk, who was a Dist. 8 candidate, was accused of forging signatures on voter registration forms and absentee ballot requests.
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