June 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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June 5, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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May 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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May 1, 2019 Election Guide Issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
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Wednesday, June 26, 2019
June 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
June 5, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
May 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
May 1, 2019 Election Guide Issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
Cherokee Nation citizen Kurt Henry and his wife, Robin, stand in front of a sign for their rental vacation property, The Nest, in Paradise Hill near Lake Tenkiller in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The sunroom is the first room visitors see upon entering The Nest. The room faces Lake Tenkiller and can be used to sit, relax, drink coffee, and enjoy a nice outdoor view. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHEONIX
The Nest contains three bedrooms in the 1,856-square-foot rental property on Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A dining area, kitchen area and living room are included for visitors to enjoy at The Nest in the Paradise Hill community near Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A view of the outdoor deck at The Nest contains a hot tub, an outdoor dining area, grill and a seating area. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A fire pit with seating sits in the back yard of The Nest, overlooking Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
GORE – Anyone looking for rest and relaxation can stay at The Nest, a vacation rental home with a view of Lake Tenkiller.

Owned by Cherokee Nation citizen Kurt Henry and his wife, Robin, The Nest is a three-bedroom, two-bathroom, fully renovated 1960s lake cabin located near Fin & Feather Resort in the Paradise Hill community. It was purchased in 2018 by Henry and renovated for visitors to enjoy.

At 1,856 square feet, the house sleeps up to six people and includes a sunroom, outdoor deck, dining area and living room.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The latest national report on the well-being of children by the Annie E. Casey Foundation shows Oklahoma has improved its economic, health, education and social factors for children, although the state remains in the bottom 20 percent of the rankings.

The “Kids Count” report released June 17 ranks Oklahoma 42nd among the 50 states, an improvement from 44th a year ago. The current ranking is based on data from 2017.

The state showed improvement with lower percentages of children in poverty; low-birth weight babies; the childhood and teen death rate; the teen birth rate and alcohol and drug abuse, and an increase in the percentage of children who have health insurance.

The report also shows an increase in the percentage of children in single parent families.
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Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs President Jonathan Small, right, talks with attorneys Travis Jett, left, and Robert McCampbell, center, following a hearing in the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Medicaid expansion in the state on June 18 in Oklahoma City. SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Oklahoma’s highest court on June 18 rejected a legal effort to block a plan for a public vote on whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of poor residents.

Just hours after hearing oral arguments in the case, the Oklahoma Supreme Court rejected the challenge spearheaded by a conservative think-tank that has long opposed to making the federally funded health insurance program available to more people.

The court’s decision authorized supporters to proceed with gathering the nearly 178,000 signatures they will need to get the question on the ballot. The plan was challenged by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, which argued that the proposed ballot language doesn’t accurately describe what the measure does.
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A whitetail deer at Sequoyah State Park takes a mid-afternoon rest about 100 yards from the park’s main road. Wildlife viewing is a popular activity at the park, and the lake levels have not diminished sightings of local fauna. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Despite high water levels caused by recent flooding on Fort Gibson Lake, nine holes are still open on the Sequoyah State Park golf course. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Despite high water levels caused by recent flooding on Fort Gibson Lake, nine holes are still open on the Sequoyah State Park golf course. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
HULBERT – It’s been a rough start to the summer for Sequoyah State Park, west of Hulbert on Highway 51.

Like so many families and establishments, the 303-acre park has endured the adversity of the historically copious spring rains, and many features remain partially flooded. Water levels on Fort Gibson Lake remained high in early June.
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CONCHO (AP) – Families and friends of missing or slain American Indian women and girls are again calling for justice for their loved ones.

About 200 people gathered June 14 near the headquarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Concho. Many wore red and marched, holding signs with pictures of women on them.

Similar demonstrations have taken place in other states amid growing concern that police nationwide are not adequately identifying or reporting cases of missing and murdered Native American and Alaska Native women and girls. Those demographic groups have some of the nation's highest rates of sexual and domestic violence .

Kateri Fletcher is a Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal government official who helped organize the event. She said it was designed to bring awareness and show support for families who still need answers.
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Shown here on June 6 in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., Joy Harjo, a Muscogee (Creek) Nation citizen, has been named the country’s next poet laureate, becoming the first Native American to hold that position. Harjo’s one-year term begins this fall. She succeeds Tracy K. Smith, who served two terms. SHAWN MILLER/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
NEW YORK (AP) – Joy Harjo, the first Native American to be named U.S. poet laureate, has been ready for a long time.

“I’ve been an unofficial poetry ambassador – on the road for poetry for years,” the 68-year-old Harjo wrote in a recent email to The Associated Press. “I’ve often been the only poet or Native poet-person that many have seen/met/heard. I’ve introduced many poetry audiences to Native poetry and audiences not expecting poetry to be poetry.”
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Cherokee Nation Chief of Staff Chuck Hoskin, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Principal Chief Richard Sneed, CN Principal Chief Bill John Baker, CN Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and CN Tribal Council Speaker Joe Byrd stand with the 2019 “Remember the Removal” Bike Ride cyclists after they finished their 950-mile trek on June 20 in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Cherokee Immersion Charter School students greet teacher assistant and “Remember the Removal” mentor cyclist Marie Eubanks, of Rocky Mountain, on June 20 in Tahlequah. COURTESY
“Remember the Removal” cyclist Manuel Hernandez, of the Big Y community in North Carolina, is greeted with high-fives after arriving June 20 in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Cheering spectators and supporters greet the “Remember the Removal” cyclists as they enter Tahlequah. The Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians cyclists finished the 950-mile trip on June 20. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“Remember the Removal” cyclist Destiny Matthews, of Watts,  hugs her mother, Miranda Matthews, after returning from the 950-mile journey on June 20. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Monica Wildcat, an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians cyclist, hugs her children on June 20 in Tahlequah after finishing the last leg of the “Remember the Removal” Bike Ride. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH – Thirty-five years after the initial bike ride, and with more than 200 alumni, the 2019 “Remember the Removal” Bike Ride cyclists were welcomed home by a swarm of friends and family on June 20 at the Cherokee National Peace Pavilion.

The 21 cyclists, made up of Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizens, rode down Water Avenue in the final leg of their 950-mile journey that retraced the Northern Route of the Trail of Tears.
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TAHLEQUAH – Singing and dancing to songs of the 1960s such as Jan & Dean’s hit “Little Old Lady from Pasadena” and Marty Robbins’ classic country ballad “El Paso,” the Northeastern State University River City Players opened their 2019 season June 13-14 and Cherokee Nation citizens played major roles in the productions.

Since 1986, the group has entertained audiences, and by the season premieres of the rock ‘n’ roll and country and western shows, this year will be no different.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Kenneth Byrd and his wife, Haley, stand in the entryway of their shop – the Garden Gate in Gore. The Garden Gate is a flea market-style shop with vendor booths that sell various items from local vendors, including antiques. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Customers browse a booth on May 8 at the Garden Gate in Gore. The Garden Gate was already an established business when Cherokee Nation citizen Kenneth Byrd and his wife took over in February. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Garden Gate carries a myriad of items from local vendors, including baby products sold by Okie Gals Boutique. In addition to shopping, the Garden Gate shares a space with The Coffee Shop and Emily’s Tea Room. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Handmade soaps, lotions and other products by Farm Fresh Beauty are displayed in one of several vendor booths at the Garden Gate in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A variety of older collectible and antique items are dispersed throughout the Garden Gate. The store is at 103 N. Main Street in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Garden Gate, a Cherokee-owned business, offers various locally made items and antiques in downtown Gore.
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Three races will be decided July 27 in a runoff election for Dist. 3, 12 and an At-Large seat.
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Because of its size, the project was planned in a northern and a southern phase, covering a portion of a highly traveled road in the county.
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