Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Oct. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
September 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
September 3, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
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Monday, October 21, 2019
Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
Oct. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix
September 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
September 3, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
Atlanta Braves fans cheer on Oct. 2 with a tomahawk chop and chant during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers. Braves officials say they plan to have talks with Native Americans about the tomahawk chop that has drawn complaints and stoked controversy during the Major League Baseball postseason. JOHN AMIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Team representatives will hold the talks during the offseason about deciding whether to keep the tradition.
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George Tiger
MUSKOGEE (AP) – A Texas man has pleaded guilty to theft, bribery and tax fraud charges in a scheme involving former Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief George Tiger related to work for the Wetumka-based Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town.
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Chris Tucker
The actor and comedian will perform in The Joint on Jan. 17.
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Emma Coombes
Cherokee Nation citizen Emma Coombes entered a drawing called “Changing the World One Book at a Time” that earned her $1,529” toward college savings and $500 for her school in the “Oklahoma 529 College Saving’s Plan Change the World” during the 2018-19 school year. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Emma Coombes receives more than $1,500 for her college savings.
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The annual Halloween party includes a $20,000 costume contest and drawings.
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Three trick-or-treaters venture toward a house on Halloween as another one leaves Safekids.org recommends that children follow 10 steps to improve safety when trick-or-treating. ARCHIVE
Safety should be the biggest concern for parents and trick-or-treaters on Halloween.
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Alexander Joyce
With the costs of college continuing to rise and many students and families saddled with heavy debt, saving for college has become as important as ever.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Supporters of a proposal to expand Medicaid in Oklahoma said they have enough signatures to put a state question on the ballot next year.
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National Trail of Tears Association President Jack Baker, left, Illinois TOTA Chapter Vice President Heather Carey, Cairo Mayor Thomas Simpson, TOTA Executive Director Troy Poteete and Illinois TOTA Chapter President Sandy Boaz take part in unveiling two new wayside exhibits that share information about the water route used by Cherokees during the forced removal. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Two new wayside exhibits created by the Illinois and Kentucky Trail of Tears Association chapters along with the National Park Service are on display at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers in Illinois. The exhibits share information about the water route used by Cherokee people to reach Indian Territory. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
This wayside marker tells of the federal government’s plan to move Cherokees to Indian Territory in 1838 by a water route, but low river levels forced most Cherokees to make the move west by land. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Principal Chief John Ross stopped his steamboat on the Mississippi River near Cairo, Illinois, in January 1839 to go to Cherokee detachments stranded on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River. He replaced some detachment leaders and encouraged the detachments to continue moving west. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Four Cherokee water route detachments passed by the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and 11 land detachments crossed the Mississippi River north of the confluence in 1838 and 1839. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
National Trail of Tears Association President Jack Baker, right, speaks to TOTA members and Cairo city officials during an Oct. 14 dedication ceremony for two National Park Service wayside exhibits that share information about the water route used by Cherokees during removal. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The markers explain that detachments of Cherokees making their way west became trapped in Illinois because of a frozen Mississippi River.
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The Centennial Tribal Monument is unveiled at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College in Miami on Oct. 14, which the college celebrated as Indigenous Peoples’ Day. ROGER NOMER/JOPLIN GLOVE
Ravyn Whitebird, president of the Native American Student Association and Miss Indian NEO, listens during the unveiling ceremony for the Centennial Tribal Monument on Oct. 14 at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College. ROGER NOMER/JOPLIN GLOVE
The monument dedicated as part of Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration sits in front of Kah-Ne-You-Ah Hall.
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The ceremony will begin at 1 p.m. at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. The names of Cherokee warriors who fought in the battle are listed on the monument.
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