November 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
October 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
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Monday, November 19, 2018
November 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online
October 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online
TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Bass Pro Shops has reached out to the Cherokee Nation after a photo of a Trail of Tears rifle at an Arkansas store caused social media users to call for a boycott of the business.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Conservation groups are expressing disappointment with an agreement between Oklahoma and Arkansas officials to study ways to improve water quality in the Illinois River watershed.
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NORTH LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas and Oklahoma state agencies have signed an agreement which commits the states to work together to address concerns about water quality in the Illinois River.
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Cherokee artist Nathalie Standingcloud wears the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2018 Cherokee Homecoming T-shirt that she designed. The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting concepts for its 2019 T-shirt. To submit an idea, email travis-snell@cherokee.org. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Phoenix will accept concepts from artists who are Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band citizens until midnight on Jan. 1.
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Country legend to perform at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.
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Bass Pro Shops has pulled a used 1978 Winchester rifle commemorating the Cherokee Trail of Tears from one of its Arkansas store’s shelves and apologized to the tribe after this photo of the gun led to calls to boycott the outdoor gear chain. SETH HAINES
A customer in Arkansas posts photos of the rifle on Twitter, leading to accusations that Bass Pro was profiting from the Cherokee Nation’s forced removal.
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A limited supply of medical marijuana flower in Oklahoma means some patients are paying premium prices and businesses are running out of products. COURTESY
Many licensed medical marijuana businesses in the state won’t be selling buds before December, when widespread harvests are expected to be complete.
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Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis’s registrar confirmation and the Dist. 7 special election timeline pass the Rules Committee, but not a special Tribal Council meeting due to lack of quorum.
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Aaron Fletcher
Aaron Fletcher earns a Federal Aviation Administration honor for his role in a new weather observation model.
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People walk toward the Tennessee River on Nov. 10 where hundreds of Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people crossed the river on boats to begin their journey west during the forced removals or Trail of Tears. JOY MONTGOMERY
About 50 people joined Cherokee Nation citizen Mildred Taylor of Marble City, Oklahoma, left, Doris Trevino and Muscogee (Creek) citizen Melba Checote Eads, right, to commemorate the crossing of the Tennessee River by the Hildebrand detachment at Blythe Ferry on Nov. 10, 1838. The detachment was the largest detachment that traveled the Northern Route of the Trail of Tears with 1,766 people. JOY MONTGOMERY
Mildred Taylor of Marble City, Oklahoma, left, and Muscogee (Creek) citizen Melba Checote Eads, speak to the crowd after placing wreaths in honor of their ancestors who crossed the Tennessee River at Blythe Ferry in November 1838. DEBBIE MOORE
Historic events involving Cherokee people are a part of Meigs County near the Tennessee and Hiwassee Rivers in Birchwood, Tennessee. This marker is also near Blythe Ferry that carried thousands of Cherokee people across the Tennessee River to begin their journey west during the Trail of Tears. JOY MONTGOMERY
About 50 people walked in cold weather on Nov. 10 to remember Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people who crossed the Tennessee River at Blythe’s Ferry during the forced removals in 1838.
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TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Foundation is offering Native American students a free ACT Boot Camp on Dec. 1.

The one-day course will be held from 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at the Sequoyah High School Gym.

Juniors and seniors can apply through Nov. 26.
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