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Monday, April 22, 2019
Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
April 15, 2019 Election Guide Issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
April 1, 2019 PDF of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
March 15, 2019 PDF of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
The “Breaking the Silence: #MMIW #MeToo” art exhibit sits in the mezzanine on the second floor of the John Vaughan Library on the Northeastern State University campus in Tahlequah. The exhibit was set to run the entire month of April in conjunction with the 47th annual Symposium on the American Indian. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“Lost, Stolen, Never forgotten” submitted by Megan McDermott (Blackfeet/Plains Cree) depicts a girl amid dying trees and in a field of poppies, a metaphor for the link between girls and women and drug trafficking is one of several art pieces in the “Breaking the Silence: #MMIW #MeToo” art exhibit in the John Vaughan Library at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Angelina Pakali York (Choctaw) submitted “Lost, Missing, Murdered Sisters,” a colored graphite/pencil/marker drawing in remembrance of Native women taken from their families in the “Breaking the Silence: #MMIW #MeToo” art exhibit. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The show displays pieces submitted by Northeastern State University students as well as local and nationwide artists.
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TAHLEQUAH – After an April 18 hearing, At-Large Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield has been disqualified from the 2019 at-large race, in which she was running as the incumbent.

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission, after hearing testimony from Hatfield and CN Attorney General Todd Hembree, voted unanimously to disqualify Hatfield from the June 1 general election.

“It is … the decision of the Cherokee Nation Election Commission that Wanda Hatfield is disqualified as a candidate for the At-Large Council for the Cherokee Nation 2019 General Election,” said CNEC Chair Shawna Calico, reading the decision.
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Shannon Buhl, director of the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, talks about deputy marshal pay rates April 15 during a Tribal Council meeting in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dr. William Pettit, dean of the future Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation, and OSU Center for Health Sciences president Kayse Shrum pose for photographs with the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council on April 15. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH — Cherokee Nation leaders this month increased the Marshal Service budget by $256,757 for salary hikes.

Shannon Buhl, director of the CN Marshal Service, said the additional funds would be used to bring approximately half of the agency’s 31-officer force up to Bureau of Indian Affairs pay-scale standards.

“Everybody will meet the standard of the BIA now,” Buhl told the Tribal Council on April 15. “Some people get raises just because their salary was actually lower than the BIA.”
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Don Marshall, executive director of Oaks Indian Mission, attends an alumni reunion on April 6 in Oaks. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Rev. Don Marshall will step down at the end of year.
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Sol Mockicin, left, who lived at Oaks Indian Mission for 12 years in his youth, jokes with fellow mission alumni at an April 6 reunion on campus. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Twins Ray Grass and Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, attend a reunion at Oaks Indian Mission on April 6. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Oaks Indian Mission alumni Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, left, and Bobby Joe Sapp, of Bull Hollow, talk April 6 on the mission grounds. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Native American children have been calling the mission home since 1926.
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Julie Combs
Cherokee Nation citizen Julie Combs will learn how the government works with tribal nations as a Udall Foundation intern.
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The status of sports betting in each state. ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 21, 2018, file photo, a man watches the off-track betting screens at Riverwind Casino in Norman. In some states where tribal gambling is prevalent, sports betting bills have not been introduced at all. That’s the case in Oklahoma, as well as California and Florida, which are home to politically influential tribes that have been cool to the idea. SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCATIED PRESS
In many states, tribes are fighting sports betting or taking a go-slow approach.
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Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
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Thyroid-related tests were performed over a six-month period that ended in February.
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Luciana Schement
As her team’s only female wrestler this year, Schement earned a collegiate national champion title.
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The election season is upon us, and the Cherokee Phoenix is tasked to provide fair and open coverage of the election process and campaigns. We intend to analyze election campaign statements, political advertisements, as well as statements made during our upcoming debate. The only reason is to verify the accuracy, and where necessary, provide valuable context and background. We encourage you to look for this report and refer to it if you have any questions about statements made by elected or campaign officials. If you are aware of any political claims or statements that haven’t appeared in this report, please contact us and we will attempt to include them in a future issue.
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