Dec. 2 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix Read More
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Nov. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix Read More
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Nov. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix Read More
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Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase Read More
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Sunday, December 08, 2019
Dec. 2 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
Nov. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
Nov. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
The free public event begins at 4 p.m. on Dec. 13 at the Cherokee National History Museum.
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The Oklahoma Commissioner of Health asked legislators to decrease the agency’s funding by 1.5% for fiscal year 2021.
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In this Feb. 27 photo, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue testifies during a House Agriculture Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is tightening work requirements for the federal food stamp program in a move that will slash benefits for hundreds of thousands of people. The finalized rule, announced Dec. 4, will restrict states from exempting work-eligible adults from having to obtain steady employment in order to receive benefits through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which helps feed more than 36 million Americans. JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
States will be limited in exempting work-eligible adults from having to obtain steady employment to receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt says he opposes a proposed state question that would restrict prosecutors from using previous felony convictions to enhance sentences in certain criminal cases.
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Deadline for applications is Jan. 31.
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Cherokee speakers will meet at 12:30 p.m. in the Community Ballroom behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee.
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Gov. Kevin Stitt says the “truth is on our side” in Oklahoma’s apparent impasse with tribal governments over revenue percentages paid for exclusive gaming rights. Stitt says that tribes will be operating illegally on Jan. 1 if gaming compacts are not renegotiated. Tribal leaders say the compacts automatically renew. SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma tribes are interpreting the governor’s statement as an attempt to impose an artificial time limit.
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In this 2017 file photo, a makeshift memorial to Savanna Greywind featuring a painting, flowers, candle and a stuffed animal is seen in Fargo, North Dakota, outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents. Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski from Alaska is taking up the cause for a bill aimed at helping law enforcement with cases of murdered and missing Indigenous women. Former North Dakota Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp introduced and helped pass Savanna’s Act in the Senate before she lost election, but it was blocked in the House by a retiring Republican. DAVE KOLPAC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
It’s named for Savanna Greywind, a Native American North Dakota woman who was killed in 2017.
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The Cherokee Nation flag flies at the Hard Rock Casino and Hotel Tulsa in Catoosa. According to a Tulsa World story, the leaders of the five biggest tribes in the state are willing to negotiate if all compacting tribes get something in return. They are not willing to rewrite compacts. TRAVIS SNELL/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Patrons play electronic gaming machines at the Cherokee Nation’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa. The gaming tribes in the state are at an impasse with the Gov. Kevin Stitt on whether gaming compacts expire Jan. 1. Stitt says they do. The tribes say they renew. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The leaders of the Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, Chickasaw and Choctaw nations say they are open to negotiations – not to rewriting the compacts.
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Shown is a drilling rig used by oil companies. Within a year, Oklahoma could get approval from the Environmental Protection Agency to start issuing permits that will allow the oil industry to dispose of briny oil field waste in waterways. Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico are exploring the idea of allowing oil companies to recycle the fluid and either transfer it to other users or release it into surface water like streams and rivers. OKLAHOMA WATCH
Environmentalists are warning that the oil industry could wind up polluting waterways by releasing treated water before it fully understands what’s in the fluid.
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The upgrades include access to AMBER Alert in Indian Country.
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