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December 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online Read More
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November 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online Read More
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October 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online Read More
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Wednesday, December 19, 2018
December 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online
November 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online
October 2018 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available online
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Election Commission held a special meeting on Dec. 17 at their headquarters in Tahlequah. Highlights of the meeting included amending the contract of the commission attorney Harvey Chaffin, certifying Dist. 7 Tribal Council candidate Canaan Duncan and drawing for name placements on the Dist. 7 special election ballots.
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TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Supreme Court ruled on Dec. 17 that tribal council hopeful Canaan Duncan is eligible to run for office.

Duncan had already been deemed by the CN Election Commission eligible to run for the vacant District 7 seat in a 4-0 vote following challenges from Robin Mayes and Tim Houseberg. The pair sought a reversal of that decision from the Supreme Court on Monday.

They claimed Duncan should be disqualified because he violated tribe law by campaigning while still an employee of the nation’s secretary of state office.
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The Curbing Obesity program will offer cooking classes and distribute healthy food options in Muskogee and Adair counties.
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Release of the design of the 2019 Native American dollar coin featuring Cherokee female engineer Mary Golda Ross on the reverse side. COURTESY
The 2019 coin design celebrates American Indians in the Space Program.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The Oklahoma Board of Agriculture wants state lawmakers to develop rules for poultry operations.

The board on Dec. 11 declined to approve or reject rules requiring large poultry operations to be at least one-quarter mile from occupied homes and one-half mile from public schools or city limits, in addition to distance requirements from public highways, property lines, certain streams and private and public water wells.

Environmentalists and residents of northeastern Oklahoma, home to numerous poultry operations, say the rules are not strong enough to protect water or prevent pollution. The state’s Farm Bureau and Cattlemen's Association says there was not enough time for additional input on the proposal.

State Secretary of Agriculture Jim Reese says he’s disappointed a decision wasn’t made, but says “we are happy to punt it to the Legislature.”
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Cherokee artist Nathalie Standingcloud wears the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2018 Cherokee Homecoming T-shirt that she designed. The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting concepts for its 2019 T-shirt. To submit an idea, email travis-snell@cherokee.org. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Phoenix will accept concepts from artists who are Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band citizens until midnight on Jan. 1.
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The Cherokee Casino Grove will host a Fishing League Worldwide event on March 28-31 at Grand Lake.
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Charles Grim
Dr. Charles Grim steps down to lead the Chickasaw Nation’s health program.
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From left to right are Mikah Glass, 28, of Greasy; Ricky Duvall, 48, of Lyons Switch; Stan Ross, 42, of Leach; and Robert Glass, 44, of Chalk Bluff. The four graduated from the Cherokee Language Master/Apprentice Program on Dec. 12 in Tahlequah. This is the third graduating class of Cherokee speakers and teachers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Ricky Duvall, 48, of Lyons Switch, receives a framed certificate from Principal Chief Bill John Baker during a Dec. 12 Cherokee Language Master/Apprentice Program graduation ceremony at the Tahlequah Municipal Armory. Standing with Duvall are his wife Kay Duvall and mother Lizzie Duvall. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Language Master/Apprentice Program Manager Howard Paden places a copper gorget on CMLAP graduate Robert Glass, 44, of Chalk Bluff, during a graduation ceremony on Dec. 12 in Tahlequah. CMLAP graduates are able to speak and teach the language. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
They are now considered highly proficient Cherokee speakers and can teach the language.
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Eligible applicants must be a citizen of a federally recognized tribe and a resident of the Cherokee Nation jurisdictional area.
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Cherokee Nation employees Loretta Keener, accounting/finance supervisor, and Kristen Mankiller, contract specialist, hold certificates after recently partaking in a pilot program at Oklahoma State University that assists Native American tribes with accounting and finance training. The 28-hour pilot program is an effort of the OSU Spears School of Business and the Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium and the Native American Finance Officers Association. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Oklahoma State University creates a pilot program to address financial education needs expressed by tribal nations in the Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium.
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