Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Oct. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
September 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
September 3, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
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Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Oct. 15, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix now available for purchase
Oct. 1, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix
September 17, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
September 3, 2019 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix available for purchase
The one-hour documentary “The Warrior Tradition” tells the stories of Native warriors from their own points of view. It airs at 8 p.m. CST on Nov. 11 on PBS. COURTESY
The one-hour documentary tells the largely untold story of Native Americans in the U.S. military.
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Kentucky Trail of Tears Association Chapter President Alice Murphee, left, and National Trail of Tears Association President Jack Baker listen to Superintendent of the National Park Service National Trails Office Aaron Mahr speak during an Oct. 11 ceremony dedicating two NPS wayside exhibits on the bank of the Ohio River in Paducah, Kentucky. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
One removal route used by Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people to reach Indian Territory was a water route that used the Tennessee River from Alabama and Tennessee to reach the Ohio River in Paducah, Kentucky, and then the Mississippi River at Cairo, Illinois, and finally the Arkansas River that took Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people west toward Little Rock and then Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Paducah, Kentucky, was used during the forced removal of Cherokee people as a supply stop as the Cherokee people switched from the Tennessee River to the Ohio River on their way to the nearby Mississippi River. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
This part of one of the wayside exhibits quotes Army Lt. Edward Deas, who was the agent for a group of Muscogee (Creek) people who were traveling west to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Two National Park Service wayside exhibits provide information about the water route used during forced removals or tribes.
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Cherokee Nation Management Resources employees Sherry Johnson, left, and Sandy Long place “angels” on the 2018 Cherokee Nation Angel Project tree. Application are being taken until Oct. 25 for this year’s tree. COURTESY
In 2018 during the holiday season, 1,700 children received gifts through the program.
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From left to right are Chairman of Adair County Commissioners Sam Chandler, Dist. 15 Judge Elizabeth Brown, Director of Cultural Art and Design for Cherokee Nation Businesses Gina Olaya and Dist.  15 Judge Jeff Payton. Cherokee Nation Businesses and the Adair County Historical and Genealogical Association recently partnered to help preserve and promote local history at the Adair County Courthouse. COURTESY
Wanda Morris Elliott, Adair County Historical and Genealogical Association president, tours the Adair County Courthouse and discusses the significance of the historical photos that are now on display for the public. COURTESY
The project brings historic information, photos and art to the county’s central government building.
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The free event opens to the public at 10 a.m. and includes musical performances.
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Legislators’ annual pay will go from $35,021 to $47,500.
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Red paint covers a statue of Christopher Columbus on Oct. 14 in Providence, Rhode Island, after it was vandalized on the day named to honor him as one of the first Europeans to reach North America. The statue has been the target of vandals on Columbus Day in the past. MICHELLE R. SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A statue in Rhode Island was splashed from head to toe with red paint, and a sign reading “Stop celebrating genocide” was leaned against the pedestal.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Emily Hullinger stands in front of her business near downtown Tahlequah. The Straight Edge Barbershop specializes in men’s and boys’ haircuts. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee barber Emily Hullinger works on a flattop haircut for Larat Teague, of Hulbert, in The Straight Edge Barbershop in Tahlequah. The shop celebrated its fifth anniversary Oct. 1. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Straight Edge Barbershop on Oct. 1 marked its fifth anniversary of being in business in Tahlequah. Owner Emily Hullinger, right, and three other stylists at the shop, Hanna Eagle, left, Lanae Mike and Kerry Justus, specialize in men’s and boys’ haircuts, but women who want fades or pixie cuts are welcome, too. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Straight Edge Barbershop at 514 S. Muskogee Ave. in Tahlequah offers men’s beard and hair products along with short haircuts and fades. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Located at 514 S. Muskogee Ave., the shop has been voted Best Barber in Tahlequah four times.
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The Cherokee Nation enacted the Freedom of Information and Rights of Privacy Act in 2001 for citizens to have the right to know the workings of their government.
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The “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” exhibit can be viewed by the public through March 28 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. COURTESY
Rob Daugherty, left, prepares to speak at the opening of an exhibit of his baseball memorabilia collection, “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Numerous photographs and baseball cards in the Cherokee Heritage Center exhibit “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” focus on 28 Native players who played in Major League Baseball. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Vintage baseballs and gloves are also included among the memorabilia in the Cherokee Heritage Center exhibit “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years.” D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The display includes photographs, memorabilia and information on 28 Native Americans who played Major League Baseball.
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MALINDA MAYNOR LOWERY
THE CONVERSATION VIA AP – Increasingly, Columbus Day is giving people pause.

More and more towns and cities across the country are electing to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an alternative to – or in addition to – the day intended to honor Columbus’ voyages.
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