From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield, Navy veteran Jack Buffington, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Mary Baker Shaw. The tribe recognized Buffington for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Victoria Vazquez, Air Force veteran Conn Davis, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Dick Lay. The tribe recognized Davis for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Tribal Councilor Victoria Vazquez, Army veteran James Smith, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Dick Lay. The tribe recognized Smith for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
From left to right are Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Army veteran Roy Brown, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Tribal Councilor Canaan Duncan. The tribe recognized Brown for his military service at the July 15 Tribal Council meeting. COURTESY
The tribe honors two from the Army, one from the Navy and one from the Air Force.
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TULSA, Okla. (AP) – The leaders of five of Oklahoma’s most powerful tribal nations have approved a resolution denouncing the new Republican governor’s plan to force negotiations for a bigger slice of revenue from Oklahoma’s tribal casinos.

The Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes approved the resolution July 12 during a meeting in Tulsa. The Oklahoma-based Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole nations represent about 750,000 Native Americans across the country.

In an editorial published this week, Gov. Kevin Stitt said the existing compacts should be reevaluated now that the gambling industry has matured in Oklahoma. In a statement, Stitt said he’s been clear since his campaign that he’d seek a “fair-market deal” from the tribes.

Tribal leaders and the governor disagree over what triggers a 15-year renewal of the compacts.
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TULSA (AP) – The number of Oklahoma earthquakes registering a magnitude of 3.0 or greater is on pace to decline for the fourth straight year after state regulators began directing oil and natural gas producers to close some wells and reduce injection volumes in others.

The Tulsa World reports that 27 earthquakes have been recorded in 2019, down from 97 by this time in 2018 and 144 in the first half of 2017.

Oklahoma's Corporation Commission began imposing volume limits on oil companies' disposal wells in mid-2015, after the quakes were linked to the underground injection of wastewater.

Numerous lawsuits have been filed in recent years accusing the oil companies of triggering earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey has calculated Oklahoma's short-term hazard levels to be similar to active regions in California.
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Among laws the measure would repeal is one that allows for the forced removal of Native American children from their homes to be sent to boarding schools.
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The inaugural committee for Oklahoma’s new Republican governor spent more than $2.4 million on inauguration festivities to launch his first term in office, a finance report revealed.
Gov. Kevin Stitt took office in January to become Oklahoma’s 28th governor.

The report filed July 11 indicates Stitt’s inauguration celebrations cost was more than former Gov. Mary Fallin spent on both of her inauguration festivities combined, which was $2.36 million, The Oklahoman reported.
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First-language Cherokee speakers who sign the Cherokee Speaker Roll Book will be presented a medallion with the image of Sequoyah. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
First-language Cherokee speakers from the Stilwell area are invited to attend the event and sign the roll book.
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Critics claimed the suggested raises for elected officials’ salaries were too steep.
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The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will meet at 2:30 p.m. CST, July 29, 2019, via conference call. It is an open meeting and the public is welcome to attend by using the conference call information to join the meeting.

Conference Call: 1-866-210-1669

Code: 8520374#
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Hunter’s Home in Park Hill was built in 1845. It is the last remaining pre-Civil War plantation in Oklahoma. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Greg McGee, Hunter’s Home livestock manager/outdoor historical interpreter, takes part in the site’s annual “May Day Celebration” on May 4 in Park Hill. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Efforts are underway to add more livestock and crops to Hunter’s Home in Park Hill.
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A Greater Tulsa Cherokees representative alleges the mishandling of tribal checks for at-large communities.
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Pay increases have been suggested for the principal chief and deputy chief positions as well as legislators.
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