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David Walkingstick asks the BIA to monitor the election after the tribe’s “deafening silence” on Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield asking for votes while sending tribal checks.
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Cherokee Nation deputy chief candidates Meredith Frailey and Bryan Warner hug following their April 16 debate on the campus of Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. The Cherokee Phoenix hosted the debate, which also featured principal chief candidates. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation deputy chief candidate Meredith Frailey answers a question on April 16 during a debate hosted by the Cherokee Phoenix at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation deputy chief candidate Bryan Warner speaks on April 16 during a debate hosted by the Cherokee Phoenix at Northeastern State University. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Meredith Frailey and Bryan Warner field predetermined questions composed by the Cherokee Phoenix, which hosted the event at Northeastern State University.
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Dick Lay, Chuck Hoskin Jr. and David Walkingstick stand before voters and supporters during the Cherokee Phoenix’s principal chief debate, held April 16 at the Tahlequah campus of Northeastern State University. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Former Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. answers a question during the Cherokee Phoenix’s principal chief debate on April 16 debate in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dist. 12 Tribal Councilor Dick Lay speaks to the audience during the Cherokee Phoenix’s principal chief debate on April 16 at Northeastern State University. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dist. 3 Tribal Councilor David Walkingstick responds to a question on April 16 during the Cherokee Phoenix’s principal chief debate in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
David Walkingstick, Dick Lay and Chuck Hoskin Jr. answer questions during 90-minute faceoff.
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TAHLEQUAH – After an April 18 hearing, At-Large Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield has been disqualified from the 2019 at-large race, in which she was running as the incumbent.

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission, after hearing testimony from Hatfield and CN Attorney General Todd Hembree, voted unanimously to disqualify Hatfield from the June 1 general election.

“It is … the decision of the Cherokee Nation Election Commission that Wanda Hatfield is disqualified as a candidate for the At-Large Council for the Cherokee Nation 2019 General Election,” said CNEC Chair Shawna Calico, reading the decision.
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Don Marshall, executive director of Oaks Indian Mission, attends an alumni reunion on April 6 in Oaks. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Rev. Don Marshall will step down at the end of year.
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Sol Mockicin, left, who lived at Oaks Indian Mission for 12 years in his youth, jokes with fellow mission alumni at an April 6 reunion on campus. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Twins Ray Grass and Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, attend a reunion at Oaks Indian Mission on April 6. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Oaks Indian Mission alumni Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, left, and Bobby Joe Sapp, of Bull Hollow, talk April 6 on the mission grounds. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Native American children have been calling the mission home since 1926.
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Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
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The election season is upon us, and the Cherokee Phoenix is tasked to provide fair and open coverage of the election process and campaigns. We intend to analyze election campaign statements, political advertisements, as well as statements made during our upcoming debate. The only reason is to verify the accuracy, and where necessary, provide valuable context and background. We encourage you to look for this report and refer to it if you have any questions about statements made by elected or campaign officials. If you are aware of any political claims or statements that haven’t appeared in this report, please contact us and we will attempt to include them in a future issue.
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FORT PAYNE, Ala. (AP) — Archaeologists and Cherokee scholars have collaborated to interpret tribal inscriptions written in an Alabama cave.

The inscriptions inside Manitou Cave near Fort Payne are evidence of the tribe’s syllabary, which the Cherokee scholar Sequoyah developed using symbols for each sound. It was formally adopted as the tribe’s official written language in 1825.

The study of the inscriptions was published in the April issue of Antiquity, an international archaeological journal. Experts say they describe secluded ceremonial activities in the years before the Cherokee were forcibly removed from the region along the Trail of Tears.

One inscription describes a particular game similar to lacrosse in 1828 when players entered the cave before the games and during intermission. Another was “written backwards, as if addressing readers inside the rock itself.”
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Former Funk Heritage Museum Director, Dr. Joseph Kitchen, will talk about "The Native People of Georgia and Their History."
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The Greenwood Cultural Center honors individuals and entities whose work on behalf of African Americans cause merit, recognition and elevation.
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