Kentucky Trail of Tears Association Chapter President Alice Murphee, left, and National Trail of Tears Association President Jack Baker listen to Superintendent of the National Park Service National Trails Office Aaron Mahr speak during an Oct. 11 ceremony dedicating two NPS wayside exhibits on the bank of the Ohio River in Paducah, Kentucky. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
One removal route used by Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people to reach Indian Territory was a water route that used the Tennessee River from Alabama and Tennessee to reach the Ohio River in Paducah, Kentucky, and then the Mississippi River at Cairo, Illinois, and finally the Arkansas River that took Cherokee and Muscogee (Creek) people west toward Little Rock and then Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Paducah, Kentucky, was used during the forced removal of Cherokee people as a supply stop as the Cherokee people switched from the Tennessee River to the Ohio River on their way to the nearby Mississippi River. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
This part of one of the wayside exhibits quotes Army Lt. Edward Deas, who was the agent for a group of Muscogee (Creek) people who were traveling west to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Two National Park Service wayside exhibits provide information about the water route used during forced removals or tribes.
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From left to right are Chairman of Adair County Commissioners Sam Chandler, Dist. 15 Judge Elizabeth Brown, Director of Cultural Art and Design for Cherokee Nation Businesses Gina Olaya and Dist.  15 Judge Jeff Payton. Cherokee Nation Businesses and the Adair County Historical and Genealogical Association recently partnered to help preserve and promote local history at the Adair County Courthouse. COURTESY
Wanda Morris Elliott, Adair County Historical and Genealogical Association president, tours the Adair County Courthouse and discusses the significance of the historical photos that are now on display for the public. COURTESY
The project brings historic information, photos and art to the county’s central government building.
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The free event opens to the public at 10 a.m. and includes musical performances.
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Legislators’ annual pay will go from $35,021 to $47,500.
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Red paint covers a statue of Christopher Columbus on Oct. 14 in Providence, Rhode Island, after it was vandalized on the day named to honor him as one of the first Europeans to reach North America. The statue has been the target of vandals on Columbus Day in the past. MICHELLE R. SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A statue in Rhode Island was splashed from head to toe with red paint, and a sign reading “Stop celebrating genocide” was leaned against the pedestal.
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Kacey Soliz says she is the descendant of an “adopted white” citizen listed on the Dawes Rolls.
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Oklahoma state Sen. Joseph Silk, R-Broken Bow, speaks during a Feb. 25 news conference in Oklahoma City. Silk who unsuccessfully tried to criminalize abortion has announced plans to challenge GOP U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin next year. Mullin is a Cherokee Nation citizen who has served four terms representing eastern Oklahoma in the U.S. House. SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TULSA (AP) – A Republican state senator in Oklahoma who unsuccessfully tried to criminalize abortion has announced plans to challenge GOP U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin next year.
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More than 150 people attend the Oct. 3 opening for the Washington County Cherokee Association’s new community building in Ochelata. COURTSEY
The facility offers 5,000 square feet of space where the association can host meetings, cultural events and other activities.
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One of the stars of the movie “The Outsiders,” C. Thomas Howell will take part in the “Will Rogers Motion Picture Festival.” COURTESY
Actor Barry Corbin who has been in TV shows “Northern Exposure,” “Lonesome Dove,” “Dallas” and M*A*S*H will co-host the awards ceremony for the “Will Rogers Motion Picture Festival” Oct. 30 to Nov. 2. COURTESY
The Festival concludes a year of observing Will Rogers’ contribution to the movie industry.
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A Cherokee Nation sign points to a Bell voting site on the tribe’s June 1 Election Day. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Revisions from the Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission are based on this past election cycle.
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Cherokee actor Wes Studi answers a question on Oct. 4 in Bentonville, Arkansas, regarding a new partnership for public service announcements to “raise awareness of realities on the reservations.” CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee actor Wes Studi watches, along with others, a public service announcement in which he talks about Native American issues. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee actor Wes Studi says the public service announcements aim to raise awareness of reservation life and increase foundation funding.
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