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TAHLEQUAH – After an April 18 hearing, At-Large Tribal Councilor Wanda Hatfield has been disqualified from the 2019 at-large race, in which she was running as the incumbent.

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission, after hearing testimony from Hatfield and CN Attorney General Todd Hembree, voted unanimously to disqualify Hatfield from the June 1 general election.

“It is … the decision of the Cherokee Nation Election Commission that Wanda Hatfield is disqualified as a candidate for the At-Large Council for the Cherokee Nation 2019 General Election,” said CNEC Chair Shawna Calico, reading the decision.
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Don Marshall, executive director of Oaks Indian Mission, attends an alumni reunion on April 6 in Oaks. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Rev. Don Marshall will step down at the end of year.
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Sol Mockicin, left, who lived at Oaks Indian Mission for 12 years in his youth, jokes with fellow mission alumni at an April 6 reunion on campus. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Twins Ray Grass and Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, attend a reunion at Oaks Indian Mission on April 6. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Oaks Indian Mission alumni Fay Arneecher, of Locust Grove, left, and Bobby Joe Sapp, of Bull Hollow, talk April 6 on the mission grounds. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Native American children have been calling the mission home since 1926.
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Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
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The election season is upon us, and the Cherokee Phoenix is tasked to provide fair and open coverage of the election process and campaigns. We intend to analyze election campaign statements, political advertisements, as well as statements made during our upcoming debate. The only reason is to verify the accuracy, and where necessary, provide valuable context and background. We encourage you to look for this report and refer to it if you have any questions about statements made by elected or campaign officials. If you are aware of any political claims or statements that haven’t appeared in this report, please contact us and we will attempt to include them in a future issue.
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FORT PAYNE, Ala. (AP) — Archaeologists and Cherokee scholars have collaborated to interpret tribal inscriptions written in an Alabama cave.

The inscriptions inside Manitou Cave near Fort Payne are evidence of the tribe’s syllabary, which the Cherokee scholar Sequoyah developed using symbols for each sound. It was formally adopted as the tribe’s official written language in 1825.

The study of the inscriptions was published in the April issue of Antiquity, an international archaeological journal. Experts say they describe secluded ceremonial activities in the years before the Cherokee were forcibly removed from the region along the Trail of Tears.

One inscription describes a particular game similar to lacrosse in 1828 when players entered the cave before the games and during intermission. Another was “written backwards, as if addressing readers inside the rock itself.”
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Former Funk Heritage Museum Director, Dr. Joseph Kitchen, will talk about "The Native People of Georgia and Their History."
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The Greenwood Cultural Center honors individuals and entities whose work on behalf of African Americans cause merit, recognition and elevation.
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Wanda Hatfield
On April 3, Tribal Councilor Hatfield acknowledged sending Cherokee Nation checks and campaign materials in the same envelopes.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Cullus Buck, second from right, with Eucha community members, cooks an annual wild onion dinner on March 22 in Eucha. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Wild onions are a staple in Cherokee communities throughout northeastern Oklahoma and grow each spring in moist wooded areas and are recognized by their bright green stalks. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
When wild onions are dug from the ground, they reveal a white bulb with roots. There are several types of onions including the river onions, prairie onion and native onion. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Wild onions can be cleaned by rinsing off dirt and pulling back the top layer and roots from the bulb. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
At the beginning of the spring season, several Cherokees to search for and gather a delicacy known as wild onions.
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House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., center, attends a news conference alongside Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., left, after the House voted to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act on April 4 on Capitol Hill in Washington. PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Markwayne Mullin
WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted on April 4 to reauthorize a 25-year-old law that helps victims of domestic and sexual violence, despite complaints by Republicans that Democrats were politicizing the popular law by expanding gun control.

The bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act includes a provision making it easier to take away guns from violent offenders even if they are not a spouse or domestic partner. The amendment closes the so-called “boyfriend loophole” by barring those convicted of abusing, assaulting or stalking a current or former dating partner from buying or owning a firearm.
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