Main Cherokee Phoenix Ad
OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont. A panel of federal judges were expected to decide whether lawsuits filed on behalf of babies born to opioid-addicted mothers should be separated from a larger federal case. Lawyers representing the babies and their guardians say babies have been harmed directly by the opioid industry, unlike local governments, hospitals and other entities. TOBY TALBOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Babies, unlike governments or businesses, have been directly harmed by the actions of drugmakers and are entitled to their own payments, attorneys say.
Read More
The tribe’s Vinita Health Center has 175 clients who participate in the Women, Infants and Children program.
Read More
WebAd
A limited supply of medical marijuana flower in Oklahoma means some patients are paying premium prices and businesses are running out of products. COURTESY
Many licensed medical marijuana businesses in the state won’t be selling buds before December, when widespread harvests are expected to be complete.
Read More
W.W. Hastings Hospital has until Dec. 22 to show compliance or its accreditation with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services could be terminated.
Read More
WebAd
A child receives a vaccine at the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic in this 2017 photo. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more Oklahoma parents are seeking vaccination exemptions for their children. COURTESY
The Centers for Disease Control says 2.1 percent of Oklahoma public school students and 5.6 percent of private school students claimed at least one kind of exemption.
Read More
Taylyr Williams, 27, sits on her bed in Oxford House Elmhurst in Norman, where she has lived since January. Williams is one of only 40 Oxford House residents statewide taking medication prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Her skepticism about Suboxone changed after she saw how much it helped her sister. COURTESY
Katie Guess, 36, (right) raises her hand during a vote taken at a house meeting at Oxford House Boomer in Norman. Oxford Houses require an 80 percent approval from residents to allow new applicants to move in. COURTESY
Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that produces in-depth and investigative journalism on issues facing the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to oklahomawatch.org. COURTESY
Because Oxford Houses are sober-living homes, many residents oppose letting in newcomers who are taking drugs designed to help transition them out of opioid addiction.
Read More
WebAd
The city of Stilwell has adopted a tobacco-free policy at all city-owned buildings and properties, thanks to help from Cherokee Nation Public Health. COURTESY
It prohibits tobacco use, including e-cigarettes and vaping devices, on all city-owned property and in city vehicles.
Read More
Baker was responsible for incorrectly administering medications and potentially exposing patients to blood borne pathogens.
Read More
The Environmental Working Group’s annual Dirty Dozen list, which ranks pesticide contaminations on popular fruits and vegetables, includes spinach, pears and cherries. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Though fruits and vegetable contain pesticide residues, there are ways to reduce and eliminate residue on produce.
Read More
Tribal health officials have dozens of vaccination clinics scheduled in October and November throughout the tribe’s jurisdiction.
Read More
The Cherokee Nation’s Behavioral Health is recognized for its work in suicide prevention and Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day.
Read More
WebAd

News Categories