The Oklahoma Commissioner of Health asked legislators to decrease the agency’s funding by 1.5% for fiscal year 2021.
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Twenty-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen Addison Berry curls weight at the Aerofit Healthclub in Tahlequah. It is part of her workout regimen since beginning weight training three years ago as a high school senior. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Addison Berry squats with a dumbbell at the Aerofit Healthclub in Tahlequah. In addition to lifting weights, she counts macros as part of her diet to maintain the ability to produce muscle mass and definition in her workout routine. Macronutrients are the building blocks of nutrition. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Addison Berry weight trains and counts macros to obtain a healthy lifestyle.
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The final steel beam is lifted toward the structure that will become the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at Cherokee Nation, which will open in the fall of 2020. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Many attending the topping out ceremony affixed their signatures to the beam before it was set. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The new medical school, expected to graduate 50 per year, will encourage graduates to practice for tribal nations and in rural areas.
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An artist’s rendering of the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah. CN officials will host a topping out ceremony on Nov. 25 at 19500 East Ross St. as the final beam is placed. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation officials will hoist the final beam of the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at Cherokee Nation into place on Nov. 25 in Tahlequah. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation officials will hoist the final beam of the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at Cherokee Nation into place at 11 a.m. on Nov. 25
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The Veterans Affairs will hold the immunization drives in Muskogee and Tulsa.
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The 539 area code was prompted by a new phone system that will meet the needs of the health facility and allow for future growth.
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According to this U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention map, for most of the Cherokee Nation’s territory in Oklahoma between 2015 and 2017, cardiovascular disease killed people age 35 and older at a rate of 422 to 1,096 per 100,000 deaths annually. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL
This American Heart Association graphic gives advice on how to prevent heart disease and stroke. Heart disease is the leading killer among Cherokees, according to a 2016 Cherokee Nation report. AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION
The public is generally aware of the heart-healthy lifestyle, but many do not follow it, officials say.
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An emotional Bill John Baker, former Cherokee Nation principal chief, speaks Nov. 14 during the grand opening of the W.W. Hastings Outpatient Health Center in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Nation’s new outpatient health center in Tahlequah was the site of a grand opening celebration Nov. 14. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. speaks Nov. 14 inside the four-story W.W. Hastings Outpatient Health Center as part of a grand-opening celebration. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Tribal facility to operate on federal funding.
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The Cherokee Nation’s 469,000-square-foot health facility features more than 240 exam rooms, two MRI machines, an ambulatory surgery center, 34 dental chairs, full service optometry and specialty health services. It is set to open on Nov. 14. COURTESY
The largest tribal outpatient health center in the country will open at 11 a.m. on Nov. 14.
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Juul vape products sit on a shelf. New research released on Nov. 5 shows U.S. teens who use electronic cigarettes prefer those made by Juul Labs, and mint is the favorite flavor for many of them, suggesting a shift after the company stopped selling fruit and dessert flavors in stores. ASSOCIATED PRESS
An estimated 28% of high school students and 11% of middle school students said they’d used e-cigarettes within the past month.
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NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma’s governor and Republican legislative leaders are telling the judge who ordered a drugmaker to pay $572 million to help clean up the state’s opioid crisis that the company should be responsible for additional payments if more money is needed to fully abate the problem.
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