A record number of Oklahomans signed up for health coverage through the Affordable Care Act’s federal exchange for 2020 despite persistent concerns over the future of the Obama-era health care law. OKLAHOMA WATCH
Preliminary numbers released by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare show almost 160,000 Oklahomans signed up for health care plans on the Affordable Care Act’s federal exchange for the 2020 plan year. This is the second consecutive year enrollment has increased in the state. COURTESY
Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that produces in-depth and investigative stories on important issues facing the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to oklahomawatch.org. COURTESY
Sign-ups for health exchange surge in Oklahoma despite opposition to law.
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Cigarette butts lay in an ashtray in New York. On Jan. 8, researchers reported the largest-ever decline in the U.S. cancer death rate, and they are crediting advances in the treatment of lung tumors. Most lung cancer cases are tied to smoking, and decades of declining smoking rates means lower rates of lung cancer diagnoses and deaths. JENNY KANE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
This 1964 photo made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a lung tissue specimen from a patient with adenocarcinoma of the lung. On Jan. 8, researchers reported the largest-ever decline in the U.S. cancer death rate, and they are crediting advances in the treatment of lung tumors. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL VIA AP
It fell 2.2% from 2016 to 2017, according to an American Cancer Society report.
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Mike Hunter files a lawsuit in Cleveland County District Court against Cardinal Health Inc., McKesson Corp. and AmerisourceBergen Corp.
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Health Services officials say there is a nationwide shortage of the painkiller, which is frequently prescribed to treat moderate levels of pain.
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Externships take place every year between May 1 and Sept. 30. Lengths vary, but typically range from two to four weeks.
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In this 2010 photo, mammographer Kim Fielder performs a mammogram on a patient at Cherokee Nation Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. Mammograms help detect breast cancer. ARCHIVE
This graph shows which cancers increased and decreased in incidence in Oklahoma during the years 2012-16. NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE
Determining the causes of cancer can be difficult because of numerous risk factors.
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Applicants can apply for the Indian Health Service’s Preparatory, Pre-Graduate and Health Professions scholarships.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Julie Brison stands next to her service dog, Lincoln, a standard poodle trained to help her with medical needs. Lincoln is able to detect oncoming seizures and other conditions Brison endures as part of a genetic disease called hemiplegic migraine disease. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Service dog Lincoln wears a red vest with the name of the place he was certified so that people will know not to touch him, as he is considered a medical device. Cherokee Nation citizen Julie Brison added Cherokee syllabary to Lincoln’s vest that translates to “a dog who helps you.” LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Service animals go through rigorous training for the benefit of people with disabilities.
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Natural increase drops below 1 million for the first time in decades because of fewer births and more deaths.
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1-800-QUIT-NOW offers free services and more.
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In this Oct. 24 photo, midwife and doula trainer Melissa Brown poses for a photo in Window Rock, Arizona. Brown, part Navajo and Anishinaabe, had a traumatic experience when she first gave birth as a teen and now provides doula training to help empower Indigenous women in the United States and Canada. DELIA JOHNSON/CRONKITE NEWS VIA AP
In this Oct. 24 photo, participants in an Indigenous doula training, coordinated by Changing Woman Initiative, stand outside of a hogan in Window Rock, Arizona. DELIA JOHNSON/CRONKITE NEWS VIA AP
In this Oct. 24 photo, Pam Malone of Flagstaff, Arizona, looks up at smoke billowing from a hogan at an Indigenous doula training on the Navajo reservation, in Window Rock, Ariz. Her mother kept up traditional practices in the family, but when she died, Malone stepped up to help her sister during labor. DELIA JOHNSON/CRONKITE NEWS VIA AP
They go to the Navajo reservation to be trained as doulas, aides who have no formal medical background but provide guidance for pregnant women.
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