OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Supporters of a proposal to expand Medicaid in Oklahoma said they have enough signatures to put a state question on the ballot next year.
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Leslie Begay, left, on Oct. 7 speaks with U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-New Mexico, in a hallway outside a congressional field hearing in Albuquerque, New Mexico, highlighting the atomic age’s impact on Native American communities. Begay, a former uranium miner on the Navajo Nation with lung problems, says there are lingering injustices and health problems on his reservation decades after mines closed. An Indian Health Service official cited federal research at the hearing that she says showed some Navajo women, males and babies who were part of the study had high levels of uranium in their systems. MARY HUDETZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Of 781 women screened, 26%had concentrations of uranium that exceeded levels found in the highest 5% of the U.S. population.
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Sandra Shomo, a Cherokee Nation Public Health nurse, administers a flu vaccine during a community health clinic. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation W.W. Hastings Hospital is offering free flu vaccinations at its Community Health Clinic from Oct. 21 to Nov. 1.
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Jorge Mera
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Dr. Jorge Mera receives a National Indian Health Board for his work to cure patients of the disease.
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Elderberry, in the wild, is recognized as a cluster of small, round, dark purple-to-black-colored berries that grow along roads, ditches and creeks. They bloom in the spring and berries ripen in the summer. COURTESY
A mix of elderberry, echinacea, ginger, cinnamon sticks, cloves and star anise is used to make an elderberry and echinacea syrup for treatment and prevention of cold and flu symptoms. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Elderberry and echinacea syrup can be stored in mason jars and refrigerated for up to six months and taken by dosage to help treat cold and flu symptoms. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokees have used elderberry for its medicinal properties to treat various ailments.
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Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. speaks Oct. 7 at the Cherokee Nation’s partially finished outpatient health center in Tahlequah. Medical staff and tribal leaders, including CN Medical Director Roger Montgomery, left, and Chief of Staff Todd Enlow attended the event. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Nation’s new four-story health center opened its optometry, audiology, physical rehabilitation, behavioral health, radiology, lab and pharmacy services Oct. 7 in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation medical leaders applaud during an opening event Oct. 7 outside the tribe’s new outpatient health center in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Optometry, audiology, physical rehabilitation, behavioral health, radiology, lab and pharmacy services are now operating.
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From left to right, the new Cherokee Nation outpatient health center is the largest tribal outpatient health facility in the country at 469,000 square feet. The CN is looking for volunteers to act as guides for patients and visitors at the center. COURTESY
Volunteers will help others navigate the health facility during its first few months.
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Veterans in Muskogee, Tulsa, Vinita, McAlester and Idabel can also receive flu shots in their respective VA primary care teams on a walk-in basis.
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Construction crew members work on the exterior of the Cherokee Nation’s 469,000-square-foot outpatient health facility in Tahlequah. Tribal officials say the facility should open in phases in October on the W.W. Hastings Hospital campus. COURTESY
Construction crew members work on the exterior of the Cherokee Nation’s 469,000-square-foot outpatient health facility in Tahlequah. Tribal officials say the facility should open in phases in October on the W.W. Hastings Hospital campus. COURTESY
A construction crew from Flintco-Cooper piece together the grand staircase in the main entrance of the Cherokee Nation’s outpatient health facility in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Its optometry, audiology, physical rehabilitation, behavioral health, radiology, lab and pharmacy services open Oct. 7.
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Cherokee medical students Breanna Carlson, left, Sheridan Evans and Ryan Young will begin their second year of medical school this fall at the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Breanna Carlson
Sheridan Evans
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Breanna Carlson, Sheridan Evans and Ryan Young begin their second year of medical school this fall.
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This June 11 photo shows the Sioux San Hospital in Rapid City, South Dakota. The Indian Health Service, which administers health care for Native Americans, has long been plagued with problems that have kept it from improving in its delivery of health care to the more than 2.5 million people who depend on it. ADAM FONDREN/RAPID CITY JOURNAL VIA AP
A federal report states things won’t get better unless the Indian Health Service looks seriously at its organizational structure and adequately tracks hospital performance.
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