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TAHELQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday, Dec. 13 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship.

For further information about the event, please contact: the Language Program at 918-453-5151.
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The two-day event is at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.
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The symposium will present the media of Cherokee visual arts throughout time and bring together artists, art historians and other scholars to examine the visual arts history of the Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians.
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Kindergarten students TT Askew, Alicia Garcia Elvira, Haylen Lovelace and Mercy Nelms are students in Jakeli Swimmer’s Cherokee language and culture class at Robbinsville Elementary in North Carolina. LIZ SCHLEMMER/WUNC
Jakeli Swimmer teaches his weekly Cherokee language and culture class at Robbinsville Elementary in Graham County, North Carolina. LIZ SCHLEMMER/WUNC
Micah oversees a class of adult Cherokee language learners at the New Kituwah Academy in Cherokee, North Carolina. Behind him is a bulletin board he made that displays the names of the 226 remaining fluent Cherokee speakers. LIZ SCHLEMMER/WUNC
This display of shapes with their Cherokee names written in syllabary is on the wall of a pre-school room at the New Kituwah Academy, a Cherokee language immersion school in Cherokee, North Carolina. LIZ SCHLEMMER/WUNC
Third-graders Skylen Adams and Aiden Conley react to Jakeli Swimmer's Cherokee lesson on words for weather. LIZ SCHLEMMER/WUNC
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The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is trying to save the language, which some say could be practically extinct in 30 years.
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The Cherokee Nation has published a new book titled “Cherokee Nation: A History of Survival, Self Determination and Identity” to allow readers to understand and appreciate the challenges and opportunities that have shaped the CN. COURTESY
Dr. Neil Morton speaks to members of the Adair County Historical & Genealogical Association on Oct. 18 about the Cherokee Nation’s new book “Cherokee Nation: A History of Survival, Self Determination and Identity.” Spanning more than four centuries, the book is a survey of Cherokee history that people can use to be introduced to parts of that history. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Roy Boney Jr. coordinated the design, graphics and layout for a new book titled “Cherokee Nation: A History of Survival, Self Determination and Identity” that the tribe has published. Here he shows one of the maps in the book. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The book emphasizes individual leadership, the struggle for internal unity and the fight against the forces that tried to destroy the Cherokee Nation’s sovereignty.
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Cherokee Phoenix Executive Editor Brandon Scott accepts the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Stalwart Award during the SevenStar Gala on Oct. 20 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa. The award recognizes significant contributions to the Cherokee Heritage Center’s success. COURTESY
The Cherokee Phoenix receives the Stalwart Award for significant contributions to the Cherokee Heritage Center’s success.
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The Sequoyah High School “The Place Where They Play” gymnasium on Oct. 18 is filled with fluent Cherokee speakers, who are also Cherokee Nation employees, for the first CN Language Employee Speaker Appreciation Day. The event occurred after CN officials came together with plans to collect information regarding fluent speakers in different Cherokee communities. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program Curriculum Supervisor Ryan Mackey, left, and CLMAP Manager Howard Paden, center, discuss charts of data collected during the past four years about Cherokee speakers on Oct. 18 at the Cherokee Nation Language Employee Speaker Appreciation Day at the Sequoyah High School. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program Manager Howard Paden discusses information on a map of the Cherokee Nation’s 14-county jurisdiction that shows where Cherokee speakers reside. The map was displayed on Oct. 18 during the first CN Language Employee Speaker Appreciation Day at the Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Documenting Cherokee fluent speaker information will help the Cherokee tribes to gain more language resources.
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The fifth great-granddaughter of James and Catherine Bigby, Mary Jo Swietek, right, reads the biography of James during an Oct. 20 Trail of Tears Association ceremony at the Hungry Mountain Cemetery in Cherokee County. The ceremony honored the Bigby couple, which survived the Trail of Tears. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
During an Oct. 20 ceremony at Hungry Mountain Cemetery, metal plaques were placed on each survivor’s headstone that reads: “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-39. The Trail of Tears Association Oklahoma Chapter.” The plaque also includes the TOTA and Cherokee Nation seals. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
James and Catherine Bigby descendants worked together this past year to have a gravestone made, which allowed the Oklahoma Trail of Tears Association to place a metal plaque on the stone to honor James and Catherine. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Oklahoma Trail of Tears Association and Christie family members honor Trail of Tears survivor Jackson Christie on Oct. 20. He was born about 1836, probably on Valley River near present-day Murphy, North Carolina. Both of his parents were Cherokee, Jesse Christie (died 1868) and Polly (died about 1850). The family came west on the forced removal in the Situwakee/Jones detachment, which left in October 1838 and arrived in the west in February 1839. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Jackson Christie descendants stand in front of his headstone at the Hungry Mountain Cemetery in Cherokee County. Robin Christie, left, came from Texas to attend an Oct. 20 ceremony honoring her grandfather, who survived the Trail of Tears. Next to her are Leona Ferrell; Robin’s sister, Brenda; Mike Garner; and his son’s Ben, left, and Will. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Trail of Tears Association’s Oklahoma Chapter holds a ceremony at the Hungry Mountain Cemetery to respect survivors of the removal.
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TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday October 11 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship.

For further information about the event, please contact: the Language Program at 918453-5151.
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Events include Cherokee treasure hunts, archery tournaments and cultural classes.
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The annual event returns for its 13th year at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.
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