Prior to reopening, a team member tested positive for COVID-19.
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Shown are four Cherokee Phoenix homecoming T-shirts from 2017-20. The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting design ideas from Cherokee artists for its 2021 T-shirt until 11:59 p.m. CST on Dec. 31. ARCHIVE
The Cherokee Phoenix will accept complete or nearly complete drafts until 11:59 p.m. CST on Dec. 31.
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The Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill was established in 1963 by the Cherokee National Historical Society to preserve and promote the Cherokee culture. It is home to the Cherokee National Archives, which is the Cherokee Nation’s foremost collection of historic tribal-related documents and cultural treasures from the 1700s through present day. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation will own and operate the Cherokee Heritage Center.
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After years of ongoing work to restore, preserve and modernize it, the Cherokee Nation on Aug. 13 opened its newest cultural museum, the Saline Courthouse, the last of nine CN district courthouses built in the 1800s. COURTESY
The Saline Courthouse Museum features two galleries, a video presentation room, gift shop, public space and public restrooms. One gallery will feature historical and cultural exhibits while the other will be dedicated to showcasing a different Cherokee artist every two months, with scheduled demonstrations available to the public. COURTESY
“Vivian Cottrell: From Her Mother’s Hands” is the first in the Saline Courthouse Museum’s artist gallery. The exhibit highlights the basketry of Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell and showcases her mother’s influence on her art form. The exhibit runs through Oct. 24 with artist programming to be announced at a later date. COURTESY
t features two galleries, a video presentation room, gift shop, public space and public restrooms.
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“Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists” is set to open Oct. 7.
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Traci Rabbit
David Crawler
Dorothy Sullivan
Crosslin Smith
The distinction is an honor given to individuals who keep the art, language and culture alive.
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The Trail of Tears drama was the long-standing attraction at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Tsa-La-Gi amphitheater. The amphitheater is now closed down and collapsing. COURTESY
Patrons fill the seats for a 1989 performance at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Tsa-La-Gi amphitheater in Park Hill. The theater closed in 2005. COURTESY
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The Tsa-La-Gi amphitheater featured live performances between 1969 and 2005.
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Round Springs Baptist Church in Eucha is among many eastern Oklahoma churches that still incorporate Cherokee language into services. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Language less prevalent than in past as fluent speakers become fewer.
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Miss Cherokee Meekah Roy, left, and Junior Miss Cherokee Desiree Matthews are seen March 3 during a groundbreaking ceremony for an expansion project at the Wilma P. Mankiller Health Center in Stilwell. The two ambassadors will get a second year to serve because of the COVID-19 pandemic. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Miss Cherokee’s appearances have been virtual since March because of the pandemic.
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The revival of chunkey, an ancient Native American game, is played with two people competing to land a spear closest to a rolling chunkey stone and the closest spear to land without touching the stone received a point. Cherokee Nation Native Games chunkey coordinator Cole Hogner, center, watches as two competitors throw their spears during a chunkey game at the 2019 Cherokee Nation Holiday. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Based on his research of the game, United Keetoowah Band citizen Matt Girty makes different sizes and types of chunkey stones. Girty said some stones are concave on each side and some had holes drilled into the center, based on the type of game played. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Spears land in the grass near a chunkey stone as it rolls. The closest spear to land when the stone stops rolling receives one point. In the revived chunkey game, players usually play to 11 points per game. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
An ancient Native American game sees resurgence among Cherokees in Oklahoma.
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“Inage’i” or “In The Woods” will premiere at 8 p.m. on Sept. 4 at One Fire Field adjacent to the Tribal Complex. Cherokee Nation citizens Harry Oosahwee, Betty Frogg, Lauren Hummingbird and United Keetoowah Band citizen Schon Duncan were cast as voice actors. COURTESY
Cherokees Harry Oosahwee, Betty Frogg, Lauren Hummingbird and Schon Duncan are cast as voice actors.
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