The July 15 opening of the Cherokee National History Museum in Tahlequah has been postponed, according to a July 7 announcement by Cherokee Nation officials. COURTESY
Cultural sites were slated to start reopening on July 15 but have been pushed back to August.
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Children’s book, “Bella, I Care,” was written by Cherokee Nation citizen Sherry Foreman, Ph.D. in psychology. The book looks at the importance of caring and highlighting children of color. COURTESY
Sherry Foreman
Cherokee Nation citizen Sherry Foreman tells the story of a young boy who cares for a sick calf.
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The Cherokee National History Museum in Tahlequah will reopen on July 15, according to a June 19 announcement by Cherokee Nation officials. COURTESY
Some tribal tourism sites will open July 15 and others will follow on July 22 and July 29.
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Elias Boudinot
The first editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, Elias Boudinot, is buried in the Worcester Cemetery in Park Hill, Okla., not far from where he was killed in 1839, and about a mile from where the Cherokee Phoenix is published today. COURTESY
For signing the Treaty of New Echota, which called for the sale of all Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi River and the removal of all Cherokees to west of the river, John Ridge was assassinated at his home on June 22, 1839, in front of his family. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
John Ridge was buried about 500 yards to 1,000 yards from his home in Polson Cemetery, which is located southeast of Grove, Okla., in Delaware County. His father, Major, was later moved to the cemetery and buried next to him around 1853. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Tribal Councilor Jack Baker points to where he believes the assassins of Major Ridge would have hidden to ambush him on June 22, 1839. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKE PHOENIX
Major Ridge’s tombstone in Polson Cemetery in Delaware County. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Elias Boudinot, his uncle Major Ridge and Major’s son, John, were assassinated for being Treaty Party members.
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A book of legendary creatures by FJ Bertuch includes a depiction of the mythical phoenix. COURTESY
The initial phoenix artwork used by the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper in 1828. COURTESY
Elias Boudinot learned about the bird of Egyptian mythology while attending school in Connecticut.
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Sue Lofton, of Tahlequah, left, accepts a framed canvas print of a Kenny Henson painting from Cherokee Phoenix advertising representative Terris Howard on June 8. Lofton was the Cherokee Phoenix’s first quarterly giveaway winner of 2020. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Sue Lofton wins the first-quarter giveaway.
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Ned Christie
Betty Christie Frogg, a great-great niece of Ned Christie, stands in front of the former home site of her uncle (grove of trees) in Wauhillau. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A spring-fed creek still runs about 100 yards in front of the former home site of Ned Christie in Wauhillau in Adair County. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The grave of Ned Christie is located near Wauhillau in Adair County. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A display focused on Ned Christie is in the Fort Smith National Historic Site Museum in Fort Smith, Arkansas. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Fort Smith (Arkansas) National Historic Site Park Ranger Cody Faber stands of the steps of the porch where Ned Christie’s body was put on display after he was killed on Nov. 3, 1892. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
For five years, the U.S. government pursued the Cherokee senator for a crime he did not commit.
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Traci McClellan Sorell
Cherokee author Traci McClellan Sorell will receive a $20,000 stipend alongside a fully subsidized living and workspace in Tulsa.
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Sequoyah defeated John Ross in the final round of the Cherokee Phoenix’s ‘YOU DECIDE: Most Influential Cherokee in History’ Facebook poll. The Cherokee syllabary inventor beat the long-time principal chief 264 votes to 80 votes. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The list of Cherokees in the elimination-style poll consisted of those who made impacts on the tribe’s language, culture, art, government and other areas.
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On June 1, the Fort Smith National Historic Site will begin a phased-in approach to provide access to the site. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A phased approach will begin June 1 to provide access to the site.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Christopher Daugherty, of Dallas, creates “floating feather” pieces from metal and wood. COURTESY
Christopher Daugherty, left, and his grandfather, Larry Mills, hold a “floating feather” that Daugherty made from metal. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Christopher Daugherty created this “floating feather” piece from metal and wood. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Christopher Daugherty uses a special metal called Invar.
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