Cherokee speakers will meet Nov. 14 in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee.
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Basket maker Merle “Cate” Fritz, of Tahlequah, sells her Native art online and at the Tahlequah Creates gallery downtown. Fritz is the Cherokee Phoenix’s fourth quarter giveaway artist. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Artist Merle “Cate” Fritz weaves a basket Oct. 17 at the Tahlequah Creates gallery downtown. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Merle “Cate” Fritz begins weaving a basket on Oct. 17 at the Tahlequah Creates gallery. Fritz donated baskets for the Cherokee Phoenix’s fourth quarter giveaway. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Baskets for sale by artist Merle “Cate” Fritz are on display at the Tahlequah Creates gallery. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Basket weaver is the Cherokee Phoenix’s fourth quarter giveaway artist.
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Stanley Boydston’s “Rincon Low Tide” piece, part of a series, received permission for display in the square of St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice, Italy. COURTESY
Stanley Boydston describes this piece: “We are 75 percent water as infants: a mother on the left and one child: a mother who is at the very beginning of conception and wondering, wondering about the impending evolution of her life and envisioning her baby’s evolution over the next nine months, existing as one yet distinct ... a labor of love, yet a work that feels like a culmination in meaning and significance of all the paintings of my “Rincon, Low Tide,” (surf) series that I’ve been working on for the last year.” COURTESY
Cherokee artist Stanley Boydston stands outside the Piazza San Marco Venezia in Venice, Italy. COURTESY
The ocean is the theme of Cherokee artist Stanley Boydston’s works. COURTESY
Two prestigious European art exhibits feature the work of Cherokee Nation citizen Stanley Boydston.
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Cherokee author Traci Sorrell’s book “At the Mountain’s Base” focuses on a Cherokee family that awaits the return of their kin serving as a pilot in World War II. She said she hopes to make the military service of Native women more visible. COURTESY
Cherokee author Traci Sorell’s latest book honors the military service of Native women. Its afterword summarizes the achievements of Native women in the armed forces. COURTESY
Cherokee author Traci Sorell shows the inside of her latest book titled “At the Mountain’s Base” during a reading at a Tulsa book store in September. COURTESY
Cherokee author Traci Sorrell’s latest book aims to make Native women veterans more visible.
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From left to right are Cherokee Heritage Center archivist Jerrid Miller; CHC Executive Director Charles Gourd; Dustin Cooper of Cooperstone Products; Ruth Faulkner, National Society United States Daughters of 1812 Oklahoma chapter president; Tribal Councilor Mary Baker Shaw; Barbara Foreman, Cherokee Nation Veterans Center executive director; and Mary Casper, National Society United States Daughters of 1812 president. The National Society United States Daughters of 1812 gifted the CHC a new monument honoring Cherokee veterans. COURTESY
The National Society United States Daughters of 1812 gifts the monument to the Cherokee Heritage Center.
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Potter and Caddo Nation citizen Chase Kahwinhut Earles, left, shares a laugh with fellow artists Bryan Waytula and Norma Howard on Oct. 11 after winning Best of Show with his piece “Kee-wat: Caddo Home” at the 14th annual Cherokee Art Market. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
This piece created by Caddo Nation citizen Chase Kahwinhut Earles earned the top prize at this year’s Cherokee Art Market. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee National Treasure Lisa Rutherford stands next to “Da la la (Woodpecker),” her entry into this year’s Cherokee Art Market. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Marcella Yepa, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, placed second in the traditional and figurative pottery division at this year’s Cherokee Art Market for a pair of clay raccoons she made to represent her clan. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Antonio Grant, the best of division winner for traditional diverse art forms, holds his winning carved sea shell that features stickball players on Oct. 11 at a reception for the annual Cherokee Art Market at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Glenda McKay, representing the Ingalik-Athabascan tribes of Alaska, created this miniature rain parka made from a walrus stomach during the 14th annual Cherokee Art Market. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A reception attendee studies “Chickasaw Warrior,” a judge’s choice winner at the 14th annual Cherokee Art Market. The artist is Bryan Waytula, a Cherokee artist from Sand Springs.  CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
150 Native American artists representing more than 50 tribes take part in 14th annual event.
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The one-hour documentary “The Warrior Tradition” tells the stories of Native warriors from their own points of view. It airs at 8 p.m. CST on Nov. 11 on PBS. COURTESY
The one-hour documentary tells the largely untold story of Native Americans in the U.S. military.
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The “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” exhibit can be viewed by the public through March 28 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. COURTESY
Rob Daugherty, left, prepares to speak at the opening of an exhibit of his baseball memorabilia collection, “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Numerous photographs and baseball cards in the Cherokee Heritage Center exhibit “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years” focus on 28 Native players who played in Major League Baseball. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Vintage baseballs and gloves are also included among the memorabilia in the Cherokee Heritage Center exhibit “American Indians in Professional Baseball: The First Fifty Years.” D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The display includes photographs, memorabilia and information on 28 Native Americans who played Major League Baseball.
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These stained-glass pieces were made by Cherokee artist Brandi Hines for the Cherokee Phoenix’s third-quarter giveaway. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Darlene Littledeer, of Tahlequah wins two pieces of stained Glass by Cherokee artist Brandi Hines.
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Navajo artist Eugene Tapahe won the 13th annual Cherokee Art Market’s Best of Show award for a black and white collage featuring 44 photos taken at Oceti Sakowin Camp in Standing Rock, North Dakota. COURTESY
Artists will compete for a share of $75,000 in prize money awarded across 27 categories.
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Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. on Sept. 27 announces a $16 million investment in Cherokee language preservation – the largest language investment in tribal history. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation will use $5 million to renovate the former Cherokee Casino Tahlequah to house its language programs.
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