Medallions will be given to first-language Cherokee speakers who sign the Cherokee Speaker Roll Book at the “Celebration of Cherokee Speakers” event on Friday, Sept. 27 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
All Cherokee speakers are welcome to come out and enjoy a day of fellowship with other speakers, entertainment, food and “lots of door prizes.”
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Men and women play stickball on April 12 during the 47th annual Symposium on the American Indian at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Lily Drywater, left, takes part in a stickball game on April 12 on the campus of Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee language instructor Lula Elk keeps her eye on the ball during a stickball game April 12 at Northeastern State University. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A Cherokee syllabary inscription deep inside Manitou Cave near Fort Payne, Alabama, refers to an 1828 stickball game, according to researchers. ALAN CRESSLER/ANTIQUITY
Children play stickball at Sequoyah Schools’ Thompson Field during the 64th annual Cherokee National Holiday in Tahlequah. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Stickball served as an alternative to tribal war in pre-European times.
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The genealogy event is set for Sept. 19-21 at the Chota Conference Center inside the Cherokee Casino Tahlequah.
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Hartwell Francis, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Kituwah Preservation and Education Program education curriculum developer, helps create a Cherokee word with fluent speakers on March 27 at a language consortium in Cherokee, North Carolina. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Eastern band of Cherokee Indians citizen Myrtle Driver, center, and other fluent speakers take part in a language consortium on March 27 in Cherokee, North Carolina. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
During the years, Cherokee language experts have translated thousands of English words such as these shown. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Rev. James “Bo” Parris leads a hymn in Cherokee on March 28 during a language event in Cherokee, North Carolina. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Language experts from the three Cherokee tribes gather quarterly to compose words for objects or concepts historically unknown to Cherokees.
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Cherokee Nation citizen and artist Lisa Rutherford works on a twined skirt for a display for the CN Capitol Museum at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah. Twining is one of many artistic talents Rutherford has attained during the years. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
An example of Cherokee Nation citizen and artist Lisa Rutherford’s work in pottery. Pottery is Rutherford’s primary art form that earned her the title of Cherokee National Treasure in 2018. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A close-up of Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford’s twine work as she weaves a skirt for a display for the Cherokee Nation Capitol Museum in Tahlequah. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHEONIX
Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford works on a Beloved Woman outfit made up of a one-shoulder feather cape and twine skirt at the Cherokee Arts Center for the Cherokee Nation Capitol Museum in Tahlequah. Rutherford is known for having multiple Cherokee crafts in her repertoire. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Shown is an example of Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford’s work in sculpturing, influenced by the late Cherokee National Treasure Bill Glass. Rutherford during the years has learned various traditional art forms. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Continually influenced by past Cherokee art and present Cherokee artists, Lisa Rutherford extends her knowledge of Cherokee culture via her work.
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Candessa Tehee
Choogie Kingfisher
Lula Elk
Candessa Tehee, Choogie Kingfisher and Lula Elk are this year’s recipients.
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The Yale University Press printed the book “Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution and Bleeding Kansas” by University of Oregon history professor Jeffrey Ostler and released it in June. The book attempts to show how expanding American democracy hurt Native Americans in the early days of the nation and how tribes viewed the young United States as an entity seeking to erase them from existence. COURTESY OF YALE PRESS VIA AP
Leaders of the fledgling nation felt that removing Native Americans – by any means necessary – was key to allowing an expanding white population to move west.
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Stone carver Steven Stone, of Pickens County, Georgia, carves on a slab of marble that will be a memorial to the Cherokee people who were forcibly removed from Georgia in 1838. COURTESY
This image created by artist and stone carver Steven Stone is being carved onto an 8-foot-by-5-foot slab of marble and is meant to be a memorial to the Cherokee people who were forcibly removed from Georgia in 1838. COURTESY
A Trail of Tears memorial currently being carved has a young Cherokee girl carrying a doll in the foreground. The memorial will be placed atop Mount Oglethorpe in Pickens County, Georgia, this fall. COURTESY
Artist Steven Stone signs copies of one of his pieces that is also being carved into an 8-foot-by-5-foot slab of marble to be placed on top Mount Oglethorpe in Pickens County, Georgia, near his home. COURTESY
The image on the sculpted marble depicts a Cherokee family being forced from its home.
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From left to right are Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr., first runner-up Elizabeth Hummingbird, second runner-up Amari McCoy, Miss Cherokee 2019-20 Meekah Roy, third runner-up Sydneigh Fourkiller, Miss Cherokee 2018-19 Whitney Roach and Deputy Chief Bryan Warner. COURTESY
Her platform as Miss Cherokee is the preservation of Cherokee language and revitalization within the Cherokee Nation.
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From left to are Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr., 2019-20 Junior Miss Cherokee Desiree Matthews and first lady January Hoskin. Matthews won the crown on Aug. 17 during the 28th annual Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition. COURTESY
The Colcord High School junior will serve as a goodwill ambassador to promote the Cherokee Nation and share the tribe’s culture and history.
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Cherokee National Treasure Tonia Hogner-Weavel won the grand prize for blue wool coat with mink collar and cuffs features red and white cording accents and hand-beaded southeastern designs. She calls it “Heart on Heart.” COURTESY
The art show and sale runs through Sept. 21 at the Cherokee Heritage Center.
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