Tangy Acorn finishes placing a Cherokee speaker’s medallion on her father, Richard Acorn, during the Cherokee Speaker Roll book-signing event on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Names of Cherokee speakers from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are also a part of the Cherokee Speaker Roll book, which was recently taken to the EBCI in North Carolina. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Larry Nofire signs the Cherokee Speaker Roll book on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Larry Nofire signs his name to the Cherokee Speaker Roll book on July 16 at Rocky Mountain School. Nofire is a first-language Cherokee speaker. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
After signing the Cherokee Speaker Roll, first-language Cherokee speakers are presented medallions stamped with the image of Sequoyah. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
First-language Cherokee speakers visit the Rocky Mountain Community to sign the Cherokee Speaker Roll.
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Native artist Mallory Taylor created the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2019 holiday T-shirt. It shows three women, who represent the Three Sisters, and a phoenix. ARCHIVE
Native artist Mallory Taylor designed the artwork for the news organization’s 2019 holiday shirt.
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The second annual “Warriors for A Cure Powwow” to fight cancer is Sept. 7 in Muskogee outside the Three Rivers Health Center.
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The name of Troy Jackson’s sculpture to honor veterans will be “Dahnawa Ahiv Ajisonvhne Ayawisgi,” or “The soldier was wounded in war.” The sculpture will be placed at a veteran’s memorial in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Troy Jackson will create a piece intended to honor all veterans, but Cherokee Purple Heart recipients in particular.
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Carolyn Locust, left, signs the Cherokee Speaker Roll while her sister, Lucy Scoggins, waits her turn during a June 25 event to gather the signatures of first-language Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Some the 38 signatures gathered on June 25 at a Cherokee Speaker Roll event held at the Marble City Community Building. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Joe Pettit signs his name to the Cherokee Speaker Roll book during a June 25 event hosted by the Cherokee Nation. The event sought first-language Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The introduction page for the Cherokee Speaker Roll book includes a statement from Principal Chief Bill John Baker. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Medallions were given to first-language Cherokee speakers at a June 25 event in Marble City. The Cherokee Nation sought Cherokees whose first language was Cherokee. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
First-language Cherokee speaker Reba Rodgers, of Marble City, places a medallion on Norma Eli during a June 25 event hosted by the Cherokee Nation that honored Cherokee language speakers. The medallion signifies Eli is a first-language Cherokee speaker. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
First-language Cherokee speaker Anita Christie looks through the Cherokee Speaker Roll book at an event on June 25 in Marble City to honor Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
MARBLE CITY – The Cherokee Speaker Roll Project made a June 25 stop in Marble City to gather signatures in a roll book and present medallions to first-language Cherokee speakers.

The project will continue hosting gatherings in 13 area communities this summer to recognize first-language Cherokee speakers.

Master Apprentice Program Manager Howard Paden said he and his staff have been getting a good response from the speakers.
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Native artist Mallory Taylor created the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2019 holiday T-shirt. It shows three women, who represent the Three Sisters, and a phoenix. ARCHIVE
Mallory Taylor
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Phoenix has selected Native artist Mallory Taylor’s design for its 2019 holiday T-shirt, which goes on sale in July at the Cherokee Phoenix’s office and Cherokee Nation Gift Shop.

In 2016, the Cherokee Phoenix commissioned Cherokee artist Buffalo Gouge to design its initial T-shirt, one that differed from the tribe’s Cherokee National Holiday shirts. For the 2017 T-shirt, the Cherokee Phoenix sought entries from Cherokee artists and chose Daniel HorseChief’s concept. In 2018, the Cherokee Phoenix chose Nathalie Standingcloud’s design.
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Allene (Spears) Allison reads a passage written by her great-grandmother, the late Rebecca Ketcher Neugin, during a ceremony June 8 in Lost City. The ceremony celebrated Neugin as the last Trail of Tears survivors. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A special marker was added to the gravestone of Rebecca Ketcher Neugin, the last known Trail of Tears survivor, on June 8 in Lost City. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Allene (Spears) Allison, left, and Beatrice Rabbitt, descendants of the late Rebecca Ketcher Neugin, visit Neugin’s gravesite during a June 8 event in Lost City. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
National Trail of Tears Association President Jack Baker speaks June 8 during an event honoring the late Rebecca Ketcher Neugin, the last known Trail of Tears survivor. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The late Rebecca Ketcher Neugin was honored June 8 in Lost City as the last Trail of Tears survivor. COURTESY
Family forced from home in 1838.
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Cherokee Medicine Keepers and students meet on the 830-acre tract of land in Adair County designated for them as a tribal conservation area. They are working with the Cherokee Nation to obtain more land in other areas of the jurisdiction for the same purpose. COURTESY
Cherokee Medicine Keeper Anna Sixkiller, left, directs student Sky Wildcat on how to make cornbread from scratch on June 4 at the Tsa-La-Gi Community Room at the Cherokee Nation Tribal Annex in Tahlequah. Looking on is CN citizen and group leader Clint Carroll who was instrumental in putting together the Cherokee Medicine Keepers and getting the land conservation project started. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The group and students work to preserve and conserve culture, language and land via a project called “Knowing the Land.”
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From left to right in the front row are 2018-19 Little Cherokee Ambassadors Hunter Sanders, Jaycee Scraper and Ava Oxford. In the back row are 2018-19 Little Cherokee Ambassador Steven Gourd, Junior Miss Cherokee Kaitlyn Pinkerton, Miss Cherokee Whitney Roach and Little Cherokee Ambassador Maysi Fields. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – Applications for the 2019-20 Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and Little Cherokee Ambassador competitions are available.

To download the application, visit https://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Cherokee-Ambassadors and scroll to the bottom of the page. Applications are also available at the Cherokee First desk at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex.

The deadline for all applications is July 16.
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TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is offering free, family-friendly storytelling events on Wednesdays in June. The two-hour program will be hosted at the Cherokee National Peace Pavilion starting at 10 a.m., with the exception of June 19 when it will be held under the gazebo.

Each week Stories on the Square will conclude with a different hands-on activity or craft. The make-and-take activity schedule is below:

• June 5 – Painting garden rocks

• June 12 – Paper plate masks

• June 19 – “Root-runner” basket weaving

• June 26 – Mini gourd masks

The Cherokee National Peace Pavilion is at 177 S. Water Ave. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved to the Cherokee National Prison Museum at 124 E. Choctaw St.
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One of Jamil Jaser’s larger 3-D printing projects is a replica of Hunter’s Home in Park Hill. The artist’s project is still “under construction.” Jaser on May 18 showed models of different Cherokee Nation-related buildings at the Cherokee Heritage Center. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Jamil Jaser has created 3-D printing models of several Cherokee Nation historical buildings, including the Cherokee National Capitol building. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH – With the march of technology seeming to quicken its pace as the years pass, the preservation of Cherokee history or culture may not always be storytelling or traditional art.

On May 18, artist Jamil Jaser unveiled an array of scale models at the Cherokee Heritage Center. The pieces are replicas of several buildings of historical importance to the Cherokee Nation, including the Cherokee National Capitol building and Leoser Cabin.

However, these models are not like the prefab plastic model cars people once stuck together with modeling glue. Jaser’s replicas are 3-D printed. The exhibit is open at the CHC through July, with pieces added as the show continues.
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