Cherokee Nation citizen Ryley Hummingbird won the inaugural Cherokee Phoenix Student Art Contest in 2020 after receiving 383 votes of the total 1,037 cast. The submission period for the 2021 contest is now open. JOSH FOURKILLER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Phoenix is hosting another art contest for children in grades first through eighth to draw and submit their interpretations of the Cherokee Phoenix logo. All entries must be submitted by April 30. ARCHIVE
The grand prize winner will get a $100 gift card and his or her design on a youth T-shirt available for purchase at the 2021 Cherokee National Holiday.
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This Jan. 23, 2020, photo shows the National Archives on Sand Point, Washington, that has about a million boxes of generally unique, original source documents and public records. More than two dozen Native American tribes and cultural groups from the Northwest and Alaska are suing the federal government to stop the sale of the National Archives building in Seattle, a plan that would force the relocation of millions of invaluable historical records to California and Missouri. ALAN BERNER/THE SEATTLE TIMES VIA AP
The government is planning to sell the vast warehouse under a law aimed at unloading excess federal property.
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“Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer” by Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan is set for a March release. COURTESY
The book, for ages 7-11, traces Mary Golda Ross’s journey from being the only girl in her high school math class to becoming an accomplished engineer and leader.
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“Pestilence: Covid, Smallpox, Black Plague – A Floral Gas Mask” by Dallin Maybee, Northern Arapaho/Seneca, was named the Best of Show at the 15th annual Cherokee Art Market. COURTESY
The virtual market is open to the public until Dec. 21.
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This image released by ABC shows Jade Pettyjohn, from left, Jesse James Keitel and Natalie Alyn Lind in a scene from “Big Sky.” Native American tribes and coalitions are condemning “Big Sky,” a Montana-set ABC drama, for ignoring the history of violence inflicted on Indigenous women and instead making whites the crime victims. DARKO SIKMAN/ABC VIA AP
Native American tribes and advocates condemn the ABC drama for ignoring the violence inflicted on Indigenous women.
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The office is honored with the Hamilton Community Leadership Award.
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Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. signs an executive order on Nov. 18 establishing the Cherokee Nation Advisory Committee on History and Culture. Tommy Wildcat, an inaugural member of the committee, joined Hoskin to mark the occasion. COURTESY
Its inaugural members are Victoria Vazquez, Jane Osti, Jack Baker, Catherine Foreman Gray, Dawni Squirrel and Tommy Wildcat.
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An artist’s rendering shows the old Cherokee Casino Tahlequah remodeled as the Cherokee Nation’s Durbin Feeling Language Center. COURTESY
An artist’s rendering shows a Cherokee speaker home near the future Durbin Feeling Language Center in Tahlequah. COURTESY
The project is part of the Cherokee language revitalization and preservation efforts.
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According to a Cherokee Nation press release, the first Cherokee Christmas took place in 1805 when Moravian missionaries were invited by Cherokee James Vann to his home in Georgia. The Christmas exhibit showcases not only how those Cherokee traditions began, but also shows how quickly they grew in popularity, the release states. COURTESY
The exhibit is open until Jan. 2 at the Cherokee National History Museum in Tahlequah.
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“Inage’i” (In the Woods) premiered on Sept. 4 in Tahlequah and features the Cherokee language. COURTESY
The Cherokee language-based show is also nominated for the “Achievement in Animation Award” at LA Skins Fest.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Roberta Sapp finds a sassafras tree near her home in Kenwood. She gathers limbs from the tree each year in the fall to make tea for medicinal purposes. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Roberta Sapp shows how she prepares the limbs for sassafras tea by removing the leaves and breaking the limbs into 2- to 3-inch pieces. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A handful or more of sassafras is used to make tea by boiling them in water. Sassafras tea is used for medicinal purposes in the Cherokee culture. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
When sassafras tea is done, it will turn the water either a dark yellow or red color. It is best to drink the tea hot and sugar or honey can be added for taste. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Roberta Sapp learned to make sassafras tea from her grandfather, who used it as a medicine for colds and ailments.
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