Cherokee National Treasure Martha Berry is the grand prize winner for the 23rd annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show for her beaded bandolier bag titled “The Orange Monster’s Masquerade Ball.” This is her third time being honored with the grand prize. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation artist Tonia Hogner-Weavel won the Betty Scraper Garner Cherokee Elder Artist Award for her “Deerskin Suit.” Hogner-Weavel creates historically correct clothing with a modern twist. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Visitors to the Cherokee Homecoming Art Show view jewelry pieces and other items during an opening reception on Aug. 10 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. The show runs through Sept. 22. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
An oak and honeysuckle basket by Cherokee Nation artist Mike Dart titled “Giggin’ Basket” won the traditional basket category at the 23rd annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Two women view an American flag-themed mask at the 23rd annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show at the Cherokee Heritage Center. The show runs through Sept. 22. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The art show and sale runs through Sept. 22 at Cherokee Heritage Center.
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From left to right in the front row are Little Cherokee Ambassadors Jaycee Scraper and Hunter Sanders. Back Row: Ava Oxford, Steven Gourd and Maysi Fields. COURTESY
Little Cherokee Ambassadors act as role models and ambassadors for the tribe by attending events and parades for the next year.
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Faith Phillips
Faith Phillips’ third book, “Now I Lay Me Down,” is a true crime novel that focuses on two young girls who went for a walk down a dirt road and never made it home.
Faith Phillips’ third book is a true crime novel that focuses on two murders that shocked the small Oklahoma town of Weleetka.
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Cherokee artist Nathalie Standingcloud wears the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2018 Cherokee Homecoming T-shirt that she designed. The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting concepts for its 2019 T-shirt. To submit an idea, email travis-snell@cherokee.org. BRANDON SCOTT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Phoenix will accept concepts from artists who are Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band citizens until midnight on Jan. 1.
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Powwow dancers, drummers, food vendors, sponsors and volunteers are invited to take part in the fight against cancer.
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Cherokee Nation citizen and 2017 Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart stands with, right to left, Junior Miss Cherokee Danya Pigeon, Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller during an award ceremony in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen and 2017 Cherokee National Treasure Jesse Hummingbird stands with, right to left, Junior Miss Cherokee Danya Pigeon, Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller during an award ceremony in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen and 2017 Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart’s “Burden Basket.” COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen and 2017 Cherokee National Treasure Jesse Hummingbird’s “Ceremony for the New Fire.” COURTESY
Each year Cherokee Nation citizens who have shown exceptional knowledge of Cherokee art and culture are selected to receive the Cherokee National Treasure Award.
Since its inception in 1988, the tribe has awarded 96 citizens with the prestigious honor, including 2017 recipients Mike Dart and Jesse Hummingbird.
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Brenda Mallory
The award includes a one-month residency at Ucross, a stipend of $1,000 and inclusion in a forthcoming exhibition at the Ucross Art Gallery in 2019.
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Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula’s awards hang by his artwork that he entered in the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24 in Indianapolis. He received first place in the Painting Category and the “Best of Class” award for his painting titled “We Stand As One.” COURTESY
Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula, of Sand Springs, Oklahoma, won first place for his drawing titled “A Cherokee Treasure” at the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24 in Indianapolis. COURTESY
Cherokee basket artist and Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart, of Stilwell, Oklahoma, won first place for his basket “Four Winds” at the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24 in Indianapolis. COURTESY
Nearly $16,000 in prize money awarded to top artists at the 26th annual festival in Indianapolis.
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The “Cherokee Prison: Post Statehood” exhibit is on display through Jan. 31.
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Principal Chief Bill John Baker, left, stands with Ronnie Duncan, Lisa O’Field, Larry Carney and Toney Owens at the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program graduation ceremony on Dec. 2 at the Armory Municipal Center in Tahlequah. Along with receiving certificates of completion, each graduate received a copper gorget and Pendleton blanket. COURTESY
After completing the program, students will have 4,000 contact hours with the Cherokee language and spend more than 40 hours each week studying and speaking the language.
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Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is hosting a storytelling series at the Cherokee National Peace Pavilion.
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