Cherokee Nation Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor Dr. Mike Dobbins recently donated $2,000 to the community group Southern Cherokee Helpers for their community activities. Attending the announcement were Sarah Cowett, left, Callie Connolly, Derek Birdtail, Councilor Dobbins, Ginger Coleman and Henry Birdtail. COURTESY
The funding will assist the group in their effort to promote Cherokee culture through monthly community service activities and crafts in Dist. 4.
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Cherokee Nation Businesses CEO Chuck Garrett addresses the Tribal Council on Nov. 12. In his monthly report, Cherokee Nation Businesses CEO Chuck Garrett noted that the top official in Pope County, Arkansas, offered his support for CNB’s casino application. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
An amendment to the motor vehicle tag act allows the tribe to withhold funding from schools that prevent Cherokees from observing cultural practices.
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Deputy Attorney General Chrissi Nimmo speaks to the Tribal Council’s Rules Committee on Oct. 31 in Tahlequah. She informed that the Cherokee Nation looks to cut motor vehicle tag money to schools that don’t allow Cherokee students to exercise their cultural and religious practices. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation disbursed $5.7 million to 108 schools this year.
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Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. signs the Durbin Feeling Cherokee Language Preservation Act on Oct. 15 at the Tribal Complex. Seated to his left is Feeling’s brother, Russell Feeling. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Durbin Feeling Cherokee Language Preservation Act will infuse $16 million into language efforts.
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Legislators also vote to back a new $1 million job training program.
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Cherokee Nation citizen and Vietnam veteran Tommy Rayburn is honored by the tribe Sept. 16 for his service. He served in the Army. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
James Locut, 78, of Sand Springs, is honored by Cherokee Nation leaders Sept. 16 for his service in the Air Force from 1961-65. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Army veteran John Locut, 75, of Pryor, receives the Cherokee Warrior Award on Sept. 16. He served from 1960-66. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Kristy McKie, 37, of Tahlequah, an Army veteran, is honored by the tribe Sept. 16 for her service. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Tribal Council Speaker Joe Byrd hopes to secure one of four top National Congress of American Indian positions.
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Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. gives his first monthly address during the Sept. 16 Tribal Council meeting in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The largest budget in the Cherokee Nation’s history includes a higher minimum wage.
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Legislators unanimously accept the fiscal year 2019-20 funding in one day.
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The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service was asked to revise existing rules to allow non-Natives to posses eagle feathers.
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Veteran and Cherokee Nation citizen John R. Carleton, 73, of Owasso, is honored May 13 with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism. To his left and right are Dist. 13 Tribal Councilor Buel Anglen and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen and Korean War veteran Ralph A. Feather, 86, of Jay, center, receives the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism on May 13. Feather is flanked by Dist. 9 Tribal Councilor Mike Shambaugh, left, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen and Korean War veteran James D. Roe Sr., 85, of Warner, left, receives the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism on May 13. Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right, was among those who presented the honor. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The ambulance facility’s construction at the Wilma P. Mankiller Health Center in Stilwell is estimated at $4 million
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Shannon Buhl, director of the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, talks about deputy marshal pay rates April 15 during a Tribal Council meeting in Tahlequah. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dr. William Pettit, dean of the future Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation, and OSU Center for Health Sciences president Kayse Shrum pose for photographs with the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council on April 15. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH — Cherokee Nation leaders this month increased the Marshal Service budget by $256,757 for salary hikes.

Shannon Buhl, director of the CN Marshal Service, said the additional funds would be used to bring approximately half of the agency’s 31-officer force up to Bureau of Indian Affairs pay-scale standards.

“Everybody will meet the standard of the BIA now,” Buhl told the Tribal Council on April 15. “Some people get raises just because their salary was actually lower than the BIA.”
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