Without a doubt, the COVID-19 pandemic has put strains on Cherokee families, the economy in northeast Oklahoma and our local public schools.
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REBECCA NAGLE
On a warm Saturday morning this June, a crane pulled up to the courthouse square in downtown Tahlequah. As controversial monuments were being taken down by activists and cities across the country, the Cherokee Nation shook two Confederate monuments loose from their foundations, strapped them to a trailer and put them in storage.  
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Across our country, we are having a new dialogue about how we experience race and the painful chapters of United States history, including the American Civil War. Recently, I oversaw the removal of two monuments from the historic Cherokee Nation Capitol Square in Tahlequah. The monuments failed to reflect the CN’s values of freedom and inclusion, and they run contrary to the idea that CN should have control of telling its own story. 
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“It is critical to build coalitions with African Americans to advance our issues and theirs.” – Former Principal Chief Wilma Mankiller, Nov. 14, 2000.
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Tribal officials say a code exists within the Marshal Service but lacks authority to secure aid from other agencies and departments.
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On June 30, voters will make a big decision about the future of health care in Oklahoma. State Question 802 would have a $27 million economic impact on Cherokee Nation Health Services. 
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As we face this ongoing crisis, I feel fortunate to be part of our strong Cherokee Nation team. Every day I am surrounded by people making a difference. Our frontline health care workers and first responders, our caregivers and social services providers, our Cherokee Nation Businesses leaders, members of the Tribal Council, my Cabinet members, the deputy chief and all of our other staff and volunteers are performing critical work. 
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It’s hard to believe 10 years have already passed, but this month, U.S. Census postcards will show up in mailboxes across Cherokee Nation and the United States. Once you receive one of these cards, you will be able to fill out the 2020 census. It’s important for all Cherokees to do so, and I’m asking for our citizens to participate.
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Will Rogers was born in 1879 in the CooWeeScooWee District of the Cherokee Nation near the western bank of the Verdigris River. Barely more than 100 years before Will was born, the founders of the United States gathered together in Philadelphia to draft the Constitution of this new country.
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There is not a day that goes by that I do not think about what our work means for the next seven generations. What we do today will not only affect my children and grandchildren, but it will also leave a lasting impact that will be felt for generations to come. That’s why empowering youth is a priority for my administration. 
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Look no further than the current gaming compact dispute between the governor of Oklahoma and the tribes for an example of why it is important for Native people to not only vote, but also truly analyze the candidates that they support at the polls.
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