Main Cherokee Phoenix Ad
Most people know of domestic violence as physical violence – pushing, slapping, hitting or strangling – all stirring images of bruises and black eyes. However, people tend to forget the other abuse types, which are difficult to recognize.
Read More
The site is one of the historic endpoints of the Trail of Tears, which is especially significant in 2018 as we commemorate the 180th anniversary of the forced removal of the Cherokee people to Indian Territory, now modern-day Oklahoma.
Read More
WebAd
A new program created by the Cherokee Nation’s Indian Child Welfare department is called 4C – short for Cherokee Children’s Cultural Connection. It’s designed for children ages 4 to 18 who are in tribal custody.
Read More
The Cherokee Nation remains committed to protecting our women and children from violence.
Read More
WebAd
The Cherokee Nation is steadfastly committed to our military veterans, those men and women who have sacrificed so much for our tribe, our country and our collective freedoms.
Read More
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.
Read More
Art, history and contemporary culture will be all in one place, and if people want to dig deeper they can travel to Tahlequah or Ada or Anadarko or Lawton.
Read More
KEITH AUSTIN
For as long as a thousand years, Indigenous people have used a route of travel not far from here because it was the most efficient route to deliver information and supplies.
Read More
Over the past decade, the state of Oklahoma has made drastic budget cuts to public education. At the same time, teachers continue to meet additional demands beyond simply fulfilling the daily lesson plans.
Read More
Mountains in what is now western North Carolina were a part of the homelands of the Aniyunwiya or Real People – now called the Cherokee. The people speak a language that is part of the Iroquoian language family. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee people once used booger masks to tell stories and mimic the bad behavior of people not adhering to Cherokee values. The masks were also used to make fun of white settlers, which is why some masks had elongated noses and bushy tufts of hair attached to them. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee leaders worked to assimilate with their white neighbors early in the 19th century in an effort to show they were capable of managing their own affairs and worthy of remaining on their lands in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and North Carolina. A Cherokee capital (shown) was established at New Echota, Georgia, in 1819 with government buildings, businesses, streets and a newspaper office for the Cherokee Phoenix. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artists and craftspeople such as Lisa Rutherford, of Tahlequah, still use natural and modern materials to produce the same art and utilitarian objects their ancestors used in the old Cherokee Nation in the east. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Immersion Charter School student Alayna Paden listens to instructions on how to weave a basket in 2014 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. Throughout the year, Cherokee artisans take time to share their knowledge with Cherokee and non-Cherokee people to ensure their knowledge is carried on. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee language is in the Iroquoian language family.
Read More
When someone comes to a CN health center and needs something that our own clinics do not provide, like a knee replacement for example, we send them to a specialist who is outside our network of CN doctors and health care providers.
Read More
PremiumWebAd

News Categories