Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019 Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
RECENT STORIES
Thursday, November 14, 2019
Cherokee Phoenix Debate 2019
Thanks to technology, the Cherokee language can be accessed on devices such as the iPhone and users can text in the language. The Cherokee Nation’s Language Department has helped create such technology in recent years. COURTESY
In 2018, the Cherokee Phoenix printed an entire issue in the Cherokee language thanks to translations from the Cherokee Nation’s Language Department. COURTESY
The Cherokee Language Consortium made up of fluent speakers from the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has translated and documented modern words that are used in language technology. COURTESY
Audio Clip
The tribe’s Language Department enables Cherokee to be used on modern devices and downloaded in classroom materials to advance the language.
Read More
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Matthew Tooni, right, an intern learning the Cherokee language, listens to fluent speaker George Byrd of the Cherokee Nation on March 27 in Cherokee, North Carolina. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Audio Clip
The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is teaching new Cherokee speakers so they can go on to teach the language.
Read More
WebAd
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – The local chapter of Oklahomans for Equality held its sixth annual Tahlequality Pride Festival on June 29, and Cherokee Nation citizens participated at almost every level of the event.

CN citizen and director of the march Carden Crow said the group started with a picnic at Norris Park before everyone moved to CN Courthouse Square to begin its pride march through downtown. The event finale was a drag show at Ned’s Pub.

“We’re not quite big enough to hold a parade just yet, but hundreds of us will participate in the march and festival,” Crow said.

For more information on the Tahlequah Chapter’s events and functions, visit the Oklahomans for Equality Facebook page.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Ned’s pub was taken over last Saturday when the Arts Council of Tahlequah held its annual fundraiser at the establishment. Cherokee citizens once again contributed greatly to the event’s success.

According to CN citizen and ACT Vice President Callie Chunestudy, approximately $1,400 was raised to help pay for the council’s various programs throughout the year.

“The Arts Council of Tahlequah gives money to arts programs like Boys & Girls clubs,” said Chunestudy. “We hold a free winter concert. We hold history talks and give small arts grants to local artists and writers.”

Visitors to the ACT fundraiser enjoyed a reading from Cherokee Author Faith Phillips who read part of her new and untitled book, while Cherokee artists Jamil Jaser and Kindra Swafford did live paintings of corn hole boards, which were auctioned off later that evening. For more information on the Art Council of Tahlequah programs and services, visit https://www.artscounciltahlequah.com.
Read More
WebAd
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Twelve world language teachers from across America came to Tahlequah in June for the third annual IGNITE Language conference where they shared their knowledge on language methodology to a diverse audience of Indigenous language teachers from area schools, language programs and various tribes.

The conference was held June 17-20 at Heritage School and included Spanish, Japanese, French, Russian, Mandarin, Gaelic and other language teachers whose goal was to educate and enhance area language teachers’ skills through language methodology.

For more information on the 2020 IGNITE Language Conference, call Cherokee Nation Education Services Technical Specialist Wade Blevins 918-453-5441 or email wade-blevins@cherokee.org.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Singing and dancing to songs of the 1960s such as Jan & Dean’s hit “Little Old Lady from Pasadena” and Marty Robbins’ classic country ballad “El Paso,” the Northeastern State University River City Players opened their 2019 season June 13-14 and Cherokee Nation citizens played major roles in the productions.

Since 1986, the group has entertained audiences, and by the season premieres of the rock ‘n’ roll and country and western shows, this year will be no different.
Read More
WebAd
Main Cherokee Phoenix
PARK HILL – The Cherokee Heritage Center on May 10 opened its summer exhibit, “Earth Shakers: The Influence of Cherokee Women,” on Friday, which will be on display through Aug. 3.

The exhibition explores gender roles being complementary to one another, how those roles have changed, matrilineal societies as models that work and how Cherokee women embrace new materials and technologies. This exhibition traces how Cherokee women embed Cherokee cultural knowledge, even in experimental new genres, to share across generations.

“From marching for women’s suffrage in the United States’ capital to helping design the Gemini-Agena spacecraft, Cherokee women have had a major impact on the world around them. We have tried to capture their stories in this exhibit, which includes visual arts in numerous media made by Eastern Band Cherokee, Cherokee Nation, and United Keetoowah Band Cherokee women artists through history up to today,” states an exhibit description.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Sequoyah High School held its spring drama program May 2-5 at the school’s gymnasium.

This year’s production was all about Elvis and was titled “All Shook Up.” The musical consisted of various songs and scenes from the 36 movies Presley made. About 30 students comprised the cast and crew. “All Shook Up” also served at the drama department’s swan song for several seniors who were expected to graduate SHS in May.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Native American dancers, artists, singers, lecturers and visitors assembled in April at the University Center of Northeastern State University for the 47th annual Symposium on the American Indian, hosted by the NSU Center for Tribal Studies.

One of the highlights of the five-day event was the NSU powwow, held April 20 and was sponsored by the Oklahoma Arts Council. Young and old dancers and singers from the Five Civilized Tribes, southwestern states, the northern plains and other regions demonstrated various styles of Native dancing.

For more information on all NSU Center for Tribal Studies events, call 918-444-4350 or email tribalstudies@nsuok.edu.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Attendants at the 11th annual Northeastern State University Drag Show took the show’s theme, “Party Like It’s 1999” to heart on Wednesday evening cheering (and tipping) the seven performers who took stage, which included one Cherokee performer.

The show served as a fundraiser for the Stonewall Equality Alliance, which is a student association under NSU’s diversity program. SEA President and Cherokee Nation citizen Ahyoka Youngdeer said the event was to promote inclusion and equality for all. For more information on the Stonewall Equality Alliance and other LGBTQ events, call the NSU main number at 918-456-5511.
Read More
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club scholarship recipient Ashleigh Taylor helps with making grape dumplings at the club’s wild onion dinner held on March 23 in Claremore. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
CLAREMORE – The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club annual wild onion dinner was held on March 23 in Claremore.

The $25-a-plate dinner brought in numerous people who helped raise funds for the organization’s scholarship program for Cherokee Nation citizens.

The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club was established in 1899 and predates Oklahoma statehood.
Read More
Phoenix daily news delivered to your inbox
Phoenix daily news delivered to your inbox

News Categories