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Cherokee Nation Election Commission holds special meeting July 25, 2018.
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Members of One Fire Victim Services along with Cherokee Nation leaders, friends and family pay tribute to the late Secretary of State, Charles L. Head on July 18 at the Cherokee Nation Heritage Garden during the fifth annual “Charles Head Day” in Tahlequah. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Family and friends met on July 18 at the Cherokee Nation Heritage Garden to remember the life of the late secretary of State and co-creator of One Fire Victim Services, Charles L. Head as part of the fifth annual “Charles Head Day.”
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Cherokee Nation citizen and inaugural Cherokee National Treasures Children’s Art Show participant Alexis Rietman displays her award-winning basketry under the mentorship of Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart on July 7 in the Tsa-La-Gi Community Ballroom in Tahlequah. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Some student artists who presented are already accomplished artists but wanted to learn another artistic medium.
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Local and regional members of the LBGTQ community on June 30 held the fifth annual TahlEquality Pride march and picnic.
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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Kallup McCoy II on June 28 puts on a cape made of Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band tribal flags before the final turn into the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. McCoy ran 777 miles of the Trail of Tears’ Benge Route from North Carolina to Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Kallup McCoy II, far right, makes a turn on June 28 at Park Hill Road in Tahlequah as he nears the end of his 777-mile Trail of Tears run. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Kallup McCoy II completes a nearly 800-mile run to raise awareness for drug addiction among Cherokee people.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Cooper Keys is a 4-year-old who loves motocross racing. He competes in the 50cc shaft drive/air cooled and 50cc beginner divisions at Jandebeur’s Motor Sports Park in Okmulgee. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
With half a dozen races under his belt, Cherokee Nation citizen Cooper Keys has notched five third-place finishes and one second-place finish.
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Feather Smith-Trevino, a Cherokee Nation cultural biologist, center, speaks with students in the Native Explorers program at the Heirloom Garden and Native Plant Site on May 23 in Tahlequah about how the CN uses traditional plants for food and medicine. The Native Explorers program tries to increase Native youth in science and medical fields by offering experiences to meet with various educational and tribal entities in Oklahoma. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Two students with the Native Explorers program listen to Cherokee Nation cultural biologist Feather Smith-Trevino as she details the plants grown in the Heirloom Garden and Native Plant Site in Tahlequah. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Callie Chunestudy speaks with students in the Native Explorers program on May 22 at the CHC as part of their first day of activities in the Cherokee Nation. The program selected nine students from various tribal nations, including Cherokee, Comanche, Choctaw, Chickasaw Nation and Standing Rock Sioux, this year. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The student group visits Cherokee Nation landmarks such Diligwa Village and the Native Gardens.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Marcus Thompson competes in the Traditional Native Games’ chunky competition held May 20 the Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum site. The competition was part of the tribe’s first “Sequoyah Day” held in Akins. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event experience all things Cherokee.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Sophie Duch stands on her horse, Jesse, at the Rooster Days Rodeo on May 11 in Broken Arrow. Duch is a trick rider who performs at rodeos. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Sophie Duch practices a trick while on the back of a horse on March 11. Born and raised in Stilwell, Sophie’s love for western trick riding began when her parents took her to a rodeo in 2011 where the All-American Cowgirl Chicks trick riding team performed. COURTESY
Sophie Duch practices another trick on the back of a horse. Having a well-trained horse is key to the success and safety of the trick rider because many of the most difficult and dangerous tricks are performed with little or no control of the horse’s reins. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Sophie Duch is a 10-year-old trick rider and mounted target shooter.
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Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, left, tosses a baseball beside Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd before throwing out the first pitch for Cherokee Nation Night on May 4 at the Tulsa Drillers ONEOK Field. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Various tribal departments and entities such as Career Services, Cherokee Heritage Center and Government Relations set up booths.
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“Four Moons” Director Lena Gladkova-Huffman, far left, poses with the cast of her reimagined production during an April 8 preview at the Armory Municipal Center in Tahlequah. The production tells the story of Native American ballerinas Yvonne Chouteau, Rosella Hightower, Moscelyne Larkin and sisters Maria and Marjorie Tallchief known as The Five Moons. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Natalie Walker, left, and her partner perform a dance honoring the younger and older versions of Yvonne Chouteau during a preview performance on April 8 in Tahlequah. Chouteau was a citizen of the Shawnee Tribe and a famous ballerina. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Hadley Hume portrays an older version of Rosella Hightower during an April 8 preview performance of “Four Moons” in Tahlequah. During her career, Hightower studied at the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and directed several major ballet companies in Europe. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Young ballerinas from the “Four Moons” production pose in traditional dress after a preview performance in Tahlequah. Encore! Performing Society Vice President Dayna Hume was responsible for costuming, but said she received help from Cherokee National Treasures, including Tonia Weavel and Noel Grayson, when it came to accurately portraying traditional Native American dress. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“Four Moons” was expected to run in Washington, D.C., for the annual Cherokee Days on April 13-15 at the National Museum of the American Indian.
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