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Westville alumnus, coach archives history of school’s football program
WESTVILLE – Brendal Rector, an alumnus of Westville Public School, has taken it upon himself to research and archive a complete history of Westville football from the very beginning to present day.
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STILWELL – Natalie Yeager is one of many Cherokee Nation citizens who received seeds from the Cherokee Nation Seed Bank to grow throughout this growing season.
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Stilwell native Darron Hummingbird is an assistant principal for Wagoner Public Schools. His hobby is knife making, which is also a stress reliever for him. JOSH FOURKILLER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artisan Darron Hummingbird uses knife making as a stress reliever.
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“Remember the Removal” cyclist Kaylee Smith, of Tahlequah, prepares her bicycle for a training ride on April 5. This year’s nine cyclists have been forced to train separately due to the COVID-19 virus. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“Remember the Removal” mentor rider Tracie Asbill, of Briggs, left, joins Kaylee Smith, of Tahlequah, for a training ride on April 5. The cyclists have been training individually since mid-March but sometimes two cyclists ride together for safety reasons. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
tney Roach, of Tahlequah, puts air in her front tire before a training ride. She wants people to know that the bike ride is not just about riding the Trail of Tears because the nine cyclists are learning their language, history and culture. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“Remember the Removal” cyclist Whitney Roach, of Tahlequah, trains in Tahlequah to prepare for the annual bike ride that takes place in June. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
In February, teammates started riding together, gradually increasing mileage until in March when they were forced to stop training together.
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Brent Girdner
STILWELL – Every spring, Cherokee Nation citizen Brent Girdner takes to the woods in search of his favorite wild traditional food, morel mushrooms.
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STILWELL – Cherokee Nation citizen Natalie Yeager is using her gardening knowledge to bring together family, food and culture. Yeager is one of many Cherokee gardeners who received heirloom seeds from the Cherokee Nation this growing season and will be sharing her journey through a series of videos documenting the process from seed to table.
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MULDROW – Cherokee Nation Public Health hosted a free traditional food demonstration on bean bread in Muldrow on Feb. 29. Demonstrators Phyllis Sixkiller and David Crawler taught those in attendance the traditional way to prepare and serve bean bread from start to finish.
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Thanks to technology, the Cherokee language can be accessed on devices such as the iPhone and users can text in the language. The Cherokee Nation’s Language Department has helped create such technology in recent years. COURTESY
In 2018, the Cherokee Phoenix printed an entire issue in the Cherokee language thanks to translations from the Cherokee Nation’s Language Department. COURTESY
The Cherokee Language Consortium made up of fluent speakers from the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has translated and documented modern words that are used in language technology. COURTESY
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The tribe’s Language Department enables Cherokee to be used on modern devices and downloaded in classroom materials to advance the language.
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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Matthew Tooni, right, an intern learning the Cherokee language, listens to fluent speaker George Byrd of the Cherokee Nation on March 27 in Cherokee, North Carolina. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is teaching new Cherokee speakers so they can go on to teach the language.
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Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – The local chapter of Oklahomans for Equality held its sixth annual Tahlequality Pride Festival on June 29, and Cherokee Nation citizens participated at almost every level of the event.

CN citizen and director of the march Carden Crow said the group started with a picnic at Norris Park before everyone moved to CN Courthouse Square to begin its pride march through downtown. The event finale was a drag show at Ned’s Pub.

“We’re not quite big enough to hold a parade just yet, but hundreds of us will participate in the march and festival,” Crow said.

For more information on the Tahlequah Chapter’s events and functions, visit the Oklahomans for Equality Facebook page.
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Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – Ned’s pub was taken over last Saturday when the Arts Council of Tahlequah held its annual fundraiser at the establishment. Cherokee citizens once again contributed greatly to the event’s success.

According to CN citizen and ACT Vice President Callie Chunestudy, approximately $1,400 was raised to help pay for the council’s various programs throughout the year.

“The Arts Council of Tahlequah gives money to arts programs like Boys & Girls clubs,” said Chunestudy. “We hold a free winter concert. We hold history talks and give small arts grants to local artists and writers.”

Visitors to the ACT fundraiser enjoyed a reading from Cherokee Author Faith Phillips who read part of her new and untitled book, while Cherokee artists Jamil Jaser and Kindra Swafford did live paintings of corn hole boards, which were auctioned off later that evening. For more information on the Art Council of Tahlequah programs and services, visit https://www.artscounciltahlequah.com.
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