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Ohio State and Texas Tech students and teens from a Methodist group volunteer to help Cherokees.
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Presenter Jeremy Fields speaks at the Indigenous Leadership Summit on March 9 at the campus of Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH – The Center for Tribal Studies at Northeastern State University held its 2019 Indigenous Leadership Summit on March 9.

The event focused on Indigenous leadership from gender perspectives that provided a forum for participants to discuss and recognize their role as Indigenous leaders in Indian Country.

Guest speakers included Jeremy Fields and Mee-Kai Clark of Thrive.unltd, a Native American owned and operated leadership company committed to providing innovative, culturally relevant training for Native American communities.

For more information on the Center for Tribal Studies, call 918-444-4350 or visit cts.nsuok.edu.
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Sequoyah High School buses carrying the boys and girls varsity basketball teams drive through Tahlequah on March 6 before heading to Oklahoma City where they are competing in the state basketball tournament for the seventh straight year. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH - The Sequoyah High School boys and girls basketball teams are competing in the state basketball tournament this week in Oklahoma City. This is the seventh consecutive year that both teams qualified for state. A pep rally was held March 6 at the high school for the teams followed by a send-off through town with stops at the Cherokee Immersion Charter School, W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex and W.W. Hastings before heading to Oklahoma City.

The boys lost to Spiro 59-56 on March 7, while the girls defeated Washington 68-44. However, the Lady Indians' bid for a third straight state title was cut short in a semifinal upset against Christian Heritage 51-48 on March 8.
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The first floor of the Cherokee Nation’s history museum will consist of a gift shop, some gathering space and nearly 1,000-square-foot of exhibit space that will constantly change. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation’s history museum will include the tribe’s origin story. The museum will be located in the tribe’s former Capitol in Tahlequah. COURTESY
The forced removal of Cherokee people from their original homelands in what is now the southeastern United States will be a part of the new Cherokee Nation history museum. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee National Capitol Building is a downtown landmark and will continue to be as the tribe’s Cultural Tourism department readies the 152-year-old building to be a history museum.

“We’re getting ready to open this summer as a Cherokee National History Museum. We’ve been working over this past year to renovate this site,” Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said.

“We’ve been working several years to restore the exterior of the building. About a year ago we started on the interior, and now we’re getting ready to start on the actual exhibit installation.”
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Diligwa Villager Steve Daugherty finishes the roof of an arbor in the Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. The arbors will be used to shelter staff and visitors from the sun and rain in the village, which is a popular attraction in the spring and summer. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Heritage Center Maintenance Supervisor Charles Foster, left, Diligwa Villager Steve Daugherty, CHC Special Projects Manager Ken Foster and Diligwa Villager Danny McCarter work on placing posts for new arbors in the Diligwa Village at the CHC in Park Hill. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Heritage Center Maintenance Supervisor Charles Foster, center, uses a level on a post for a new arbor being built at the Diligwa Village. Diligwa Villager Steve Daugherty, right, Danny McCarter, left, and Tim Grayson, digging a posthole, assisted Foster. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Diligwa Village is a popular attraction at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. It opened in July 2013 and is a living exhibit set in 1710 that provides guests with an enhanced experience of authentic Cherokee life and history. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The first two weeks of the year the Diligwa Village is closed to allow workers to work on structures and add new ones.
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TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Election Commission held a special meeting on Dec. 17 at their headquarters in Tahlequah. Highlights of the meeting included amending the contract of the commission attorney Harvey Chaffin, certifying Dist. 7 Tribal Council candidate Canaan Duncan and drawing for name placements on the Dist. 7 special election ballots.
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Cherokee Heritage Center employees on Oct. 29 sit with members of Northeastern State University’s recently founded Sigma Nu Alpha Gamma fraternity on benches that the fraternity donated to the CHC. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Northeastern State University’s Sigma Nu Alpha Gamma fraternity gives four park-style benches to the Cherokee Heritage Center.
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Sequoyah Schools Drama Department will perform an encore of their state qualifying one-act play at 7 p.m., Oct. 24, at Sequoyah’s gymnasium. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH – After placing second earlier this month at the OSSAA Regional competition with their one-act play, “When We Were Young and Unafraid,” the Sequoyah High School Drama Department is heading to the state competition in Mustang on Oct. 26.
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Cherokee citizen Hominy Littledave carries the American flag in front of Iowa Tribe veterans during the 2nd annual Native American Day parade in Tulsa on Oct. 8. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Tribal leaders, including Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right, sit on the stage at the Guthrie Green as honored guests during the 2nd annual Native American Day event in Tulsa on Oct. 8. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker served as Parade Marshal for the 2nd annual Native American Day parade on Oct. 8 in Tulsa. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Numerous people representing various Oklahoma tribes took part in two events that celebrated Native American people on Oct. 8.
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“The Cherokee Kid: A Will Rogers Exhibit” opened Sept. 29 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. Rogers’ life in Indian Territory is highlighted in the exhibit as well as his family who came to the territory on the Trail of Tears and as Old Settlers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Rogers County residents Debra West, left, and Ollie Starr read a panel that is part of “The Cherokee Kid: A Will Rogers Exhibit,” which opened Sept. 29 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A signature hat worn by Will Rogers is part of the “Cherokee Kid: A Will Rogers Exhibit” at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. It focuses on his early life in Indian Territory and will run through March 30. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Artifacts, panels and highlights from Will Rogers’ movie career shown on a movie screen are all part of “The Cherokee Kid: A Will Rogers Exhibit,” which opened Sept. 29 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A copy of a portrait painted by the noted early 20th century painter Charles Banks Wilson is part of “The Cherokee Kid: A Will Rogers Exhibit” that runs until March 30 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Callie Chunestudy says the exhibit highlights his life in Indian Territory.
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Principal Chief Bill John Baker speaks to a group of veterans at a reception for them on Sept. 1 during the Cherokee National Holiday in Tahlequah. The stop was one of many for Baker that day, the busiest of the three-day event. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker with first lady Sherry Baker and guests Barry Switzer and Mrs. Switzer participate in the powwow. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker’s schedule at the 66th annual Cherokee National Holiday was not for the faint of heart.

“I try and visit as many events as I can.” Commented Baker, “But it’s not possible to be at them all.”

Chief Baker and first lady Sherry’s Holiday began early when they attended the 2018 Cherokee Ambassador, Junior Miss and Miss Cherokee competitions on August 25. From there their schedule picked up speed.

Said Baker, “People don’t understand what it takes to invite 100,000 people to a party!”

Cherokee Phoenix covered some of Chief Baker, Cherokee National Holiday Director Bayly Wright and CN Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin’s schedule and produced the following highlight video.
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