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Ophelia Watahomigie-Corliss, a citizen of the Havasupai Tribal Council, at Red Butte, stands at a site that the Havasupai consider sacred about 15 miles south of Tusayan, Arizona. Native American tribes are pushing the federal government to give them priority when it issues licenses that could expand internet coverage in their communities. Tribes in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Washington, Idaho and others in Arizona also are pressing the FCC for a priority filing window. On the Havasupai Tribal Council, Watahomigie-Corliss is dubbed the telecommunications member. AMY MARTIN/VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tribes say large telecommunications companies are unwilling to expand to tribal lands because of the cost.
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The June 6 at the Cherokee Nation Office of Veterans Affairs is to identify and assist veterans who may have presumptive disabilities and who might be eligible for a VA pension.
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CLAREMORE – The Claremore Indian Hospital will sponsor a Veterans Affairs Enrollment Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 6.

Hospital officials said the fair is to assist their Native American veteran patients in applying for eligibility for health care services through the VA.

“We will have Claremore Indian Hospital benefit coordinators and representatives from the VA to assist with the application processes,” Sheila Dishno, Claremore Indian Hospital patient benefit coordinator, said. “We will also have Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs here to help with those that need help filing a service claim. Please make plans to attend and bring your financial information (income and resource information) and DD-214 (military discharge) papers.”

If already enrolled, call 918-342-6240, 918-342-6511 or 918-342-6559 so a hospital official can update your file.
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From left to right are Tribal Councilor Mike Shambaugh; Little Cherokee Ambassador Steven Gourd; Little Cherokee Ambassador Maysi Fields; Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden; Principal Chief Bill John Baker (front); Kansas firefighters Sarah Lemmons, Zach Beals, Elmer Panther, Jordee Maner, Jimmy Lemmons, Misty Martin and Jason Martin; Little Cherokee Ambassador Hunter Sanders; and Miss Cherokee Whitney Roach. COURTESY
From left to right are Little Cherokee Ambassador Steven Gourd; Little Cherokee Ambassador Maysi Fields; Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden; Keys firefighters Yogi Cole, Brandon Qualls and Bobby Jackson; Little Cherokee Ambassador Hunter Sanders (front); Principal Chief Bill John Baker (front); Miss Cherokee Whitney Roach; and Keys firefighters Jerry Hooper and Jamie Houston. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation provides each department with a check for $3,500 to help with equipment, fuel or other items.
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Main Cherokee Phoenix
TAHLEQUAH – More than 400 children attended the Cherokee Nation’s third annual Safety Fair on April 26 at the One Fire Field next to the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex.

Kids enjoyed hot dogs and snacks prepared by the Tribal Employment Rights Office, received saplings from Natural Resources and learned safety precautions from representatives of the Osage Nation, Grand River Dam Authority, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma Forest Service, CN Emergency Management, CN Marshal Service and regional fire and law enforcement departments.
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Katy Faye Fleming, of Tulsa, left, and Cherokee Nation citizen Brenda Freeman, of Oktaha, clean a gravestone May 2 at Tahlequah City Cemetery as part of a hands-on preservation workshop. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Nationally known gravestone and masonry conservator Jonathan Appell repositions a headstone on May 2 at Tahlequah City Cemetery. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A gravestone preservation workshop takes place on May 2 at Tahlequah City Cemetery. Designed to increase awareness about gravestone preservation, the annual workshop focuses on how to clean and reset stones, repair fragmented tablets and generally use the proper materials. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Bob Crumrine, of Norman, helps level a gravestone on May 2 during a workshop at Tahlequah City Cemetery. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The annual class focuses on cleaning and resetting stones, repairing fragmented tablets and generally using the proper materials.
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MUSKOGEE – The Eastern Oklahoma Veterans Affairs Health Care System on May 12-18 is hosting a Women’s Health Week and free Women Veterans Information Fairs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on May 15 at its outpatient clinic in Tulsa and on May 16 at its medical center in Muskogee.

“The purpose of this outreach effort is to support women veterans on their health journey within VA,” Mark Morgan, Eastern Oklahoma VA Health Care System director, said. “We will not only have information on VA health services specific to women veterans, but also display the welcoming and supporting environments we have created for them. We encourage all women veterans not currently using VA services to enroll and use the benefits they have earned.”

EOVAHCS representatives will be on hand to discuss eligibility and enrollment, primary care, community care, suicide prevention, homeless veteran program, patient advocate program, military sexual trauma, peer support and more.
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The Adair County Sheriff’s Department received $15,000, and the Stilwell and Westville police departments each received $7,500.
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Special Olympics Oklahoma provides year-round sports training and athletic competitions in various sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.
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In 2018, the tribe helped more than 4,500 students from across the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction prepare for school with gift cards totaling more than $450,000.
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The Cherokee Nation has no immediate plans for construction work on any roads being added to Tribal Transportation Program “inventory.”
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