Cherokee Nation citizen Harold Hicks paints a wall on the inside of a house he and his son Nathan are flipping in Wagoner. COURTESY
Harold Hicks and his son Nathan consider themselves part-time house flippers, making a profit selling renovated homes.
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Cherokee Nation citizens Gwen Jones and Julie Armbrister are co-owners of Heart & Soul Kitchen in Kansas, Oklahoma. It offers homestyle foods, sandwiches, soups and breads. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Heart & Soul Kitchen customers can pick up a prepared poppy seed chicken casserole that can be easily heated in the oven for a family dinner entree. COURTESY
Among the soups offered by Heart & Soul Kitchen is vegetable beef stew. COURTESY
Patrons have given the thumbs up to Heart & Soul Kitchen’s chicken and dumplings. COURTESY
Lasagna has proven one of the most popular items among diners at Heart & Soul Kitchen. COURTESY
A customer can visit Heart & Soul Kitchen and pick up a whole tray of chocolate delight for $16. COURTESY
Owners-Operators: Gwen Jones and Julie Armbrister

Established: Aug. 4, 2018

Location: 1020 E. Tulsa Ave., Kansas, Okla.

Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday

Food Types: Homestyle foods, sandwiches, soups and breads, as well as ready-made frozen foods for carryout.
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An artist’s rendering shows the outside of the United Keetoowah Band’s The River Brewhouse, a 6,200-square-foot building that will become the largest brewery in Oklahoma. It will feature four signature beers: an amber, a pilsner, an India Pale Ale and a lager or ale. Sports betting will also be offered courtesy of Bet4 Technologies, according to the UKB Corporate Board. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – Custom brews, good food and sports betting will come together under one roof when the United Keetoowah Band’s Corporate Board officially opens The River Brewhouse in September.

“The administration building next to the old Keetoowah Casino and the whole area is going to be transformed by it. It’s going to be the biggest brewery in the state of Oklahoma,” Randall Hendricks, UKB Corporate Board director, said.
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Younger divers receive scuba instruction at Nautical Adventures Scuba near Cookson. In the onsite training pool, scuba instructor Josh Fowler offers advice to Tenkiller School students Noah Goad, 13, and Abby Goad, 10. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
COOKSON – If someone wants to learn to scuba dive, there’s no need to travel to Hawaii to pick up the skills. Several levels of scuba training are available at Nautical Adventures Scuba, located at 32320 Highway 82 on Lake Tenkiller.

Nautical Adventures Scuba offers open water entry courses and instructor or dive master programs, and is used for training by regional public safety dive teams.
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A sign welcomes people to the Catawba Indian Nation’s reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina. Two of the Carolinas’ most prominent American Indian tribes are battling over geography and lucrative gambling turf. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina, with two casinos established in the mountains, say their opponents should stay in their own state to the south. The Catawba of South Carolina argue such state boundaries are artificial and shouldn’t affect their effort to gain a foothold in the industry. JEFFREY COLLINS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are fighting to keep the Catawba of South Carolina out of North Carolina.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Kurt Henry and his wife, Robin, stand in front of a sign for their rental vacation property, The Nest, in Paradise Hill near Lake Tenkiller in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The sunroom is the first room visitors see upon entering The Nest. The room faces Lake Tenkiller and can be used to sit, relax, drink coffee, and enjoy a nice outdoor view. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHEONIX
The Nest contains three bedrooms in the 1,856-square-foot rental property on Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A dining area, kitchen area and living room are included for visitors to enjoy at The Nest in the Paradise Hill community near Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A view of the outdoor deck at The Nest contains a hot tub, an outdoor dining area, grill and a seating area. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A fire pit with seating sits in the back yard of The Nest, overlooking Lake Tenkiller. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
GORE – Anyone looking for rest and relaxation can stay at The Nest, a vacation rental home with a view of Lake Tenkiller.

Owned by Cherokee Nation citizen Kurt Henry and his wife, Robin, The Nest is a three-bedroom, two-bathroom, fully renovated 1960s lake cabin located near Fin & Feather Resort in the Paradise Hill community. It was purchased in 2018 by Henry and renovated for visitors to enjoy.

At 1,856 square feet, the house sleeps up to six people and includes a sunroom, outdoor deck, dining area and living room.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Kenneth Byrd and his wife, Haley, stand in the entryway of their shop – the Garden Gate in Gore. The Garden Gate is a flea market-style shop with vendor booths that sell various items from local vendors, including antiques. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Customers browse a booth on May 8 at the Garden Gate in Gore. The Garden Gate was already an established business when Cherokee Nation citizen Kenneth Byrd and his wife took over in February. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Garden Gate carries a myriad of items from local vendors, including baby products sold by Okie Gals Boutique. In addition to shopping, the Garden Gate shares a space with The Coffee Shop and Emily’s Tea Room. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Handmade soaps, lotions and other products by Farm Fresh Beauty are displayed in one of several vendor booths at the Garden Gate in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A variety of older collectible and antique items are dispersed throughout the Garden Gate. The store is at 103 N. Main Street in Gore. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Garden Gate, a Cherokee-owned business, offers various locally made items and antiques in downtown Gore.
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Mindy Smith, left, and Cherokee Nation citizen Taryn Smith own and operate Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market, an independent children’s bookstore in Tulsa focusing solely on children’s literature. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A reading area features board books, a tent, and “Where the Wild Things Are”-themed walls at Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market in Tulsa. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A reading room resembling the Chronicles of Narnia book series is one of many features at Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market in Tulsa. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
One of three tutoring rooms at Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market is decorated in a “Charlotte’s Web” theme. The tutoring rooms are designed to help children become more interested in reading. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Dr. Seuss-themed story time area is for smaller children to enjoy story events held each week at Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market in Tulsa. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A multi-purpose event room is decorated for a Harry Potter-themed birthday party made to resemble the Great Hall from the Harry Potter book series. Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market hosts themed birthday parties surrounding children’s literature. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TULSA – What started as a dream has become a reality for the owners and operators of Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market, an independent children’s bookstore.

Owned by Cherokee Nation citizen Jim Smith, his wife Mindy, and their daughter Taryn, also a CN citizen, Lavender’s Bleu Literacy Market opened Dec. 8 and focuses on children’s literature for infants to young adults.
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Cherokee Nation citizens Rachel Purget, left, Cole Purget, with their son Max, are the owners and operators of Wheelhouse Kitchen in Woodall. The restaurant serves “clean” locally sourced food. COURTESY
A Wheelhouse waitress serves a customer at Wheelhouse Kitchen in Woodall. The restaurant features locally sourced foods, craft beers and local wines. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Wheelhouse Kitchen in Woodall offers a variety of breakfast options. CHAD HUNTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Wheelhouse Burger is a specialty burger with two grass-fed beef patties and one pork patty topped with cheddar cheese, bacon and an over-medium egg drizzled with Wheelhouse sauce LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Protein Platter is an all protein, no-carb meal. It contains four eggs, one piece of sausage, one piece of bacon, one piece of chicken apple sausage and half an avocado. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Wheelhouse Fries are a specialty item at Wheelhouse Kitchen containing hand-cut fries topped with bacon, an over-medium egg and drizzled with Wheelhouse sauce. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
WOODALL – Coming off a successful first year in business, the Wheelhouse Kitchen continues serving up farm-fresh comfort food to regulars and newcomers alike.

Just minutes from Tahlequah, the restaurant is at 13112 Highway 62 in Woodall in southern Cherokee County. Cherokee Nation citizens Cole and Rachel Purget opened the eatery in spring 2018.
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The plant is being built in El Reno and would be chiefly for bison, but would also take in cattle and wild game.
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The four-story, 90-room hotel will feature a mixed-use lobby for guests to work, play, eat and lounge, along with an “Eat. & Sip.” market and multifunctional fitness center. COURTESY
The four-story, 90-room hotel is expected to open in the spring of 2020.
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