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Live thoroughbred racing returns to Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs on March 25. COURTESY
CLAREMORE – The trainers, jockeys and equine athletes alike are arriving once again for the 28-day thoroughbred meet returning to Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs on March 25. Track representatives are optimistic about a strong handle and a full field in its 13th year of operation, abandoning the traditional calendar for a later start date, allowing for more simulcast coverage across the country.

Races begin at 1:15 p.m. each day on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The schedule drops the Wednesday race day on May 1, replacing it with a Saturday card to finish the meet on May 25 and include the Kentucky Derby and Preakness.
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Action Floors owner Jeff McCarty prepares an estimate for a customer. McCarty said he personally measures each job to “better connect” with customers. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Action Floors in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, has been in business for nearly 40 years. Cherokee Nation citizen Jeff McCarty owns it. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Action Floors contracted installer Tony Hayes puts the finishing touches on a plank flooring job in January. Hayes installed the original flooring in the house more than 20 years ago. COURTESY
Action Floors in Tahlequah has been in business for nearly 40 years and has endured competition and big box stores.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Bill Parris, left, stands with his partners representing Muskogee Brewing Company at an event. COURTESY
An early 1900s fire fighter’s hat is displayed on the wall the separates Station 1 Restaurant and Muskogee Brewing Company’s taproom. Muskogee Brewing Company is housed in Muskogee’s first full-time fire station, Fire Station 1. GRANT NEUGIN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Several 500-gallon brewing tanks are visible from the taproom of Muskogee Brewing Company. All beer is made on site. GRANT NEUGIN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The custom-built bar back, two of the 15 taps and the growler-packaging machine are on display just a few feet from the bar at the Muskogee Brewing Company. GRANT NEUGIN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Muskogee Brewing Company transforms a historic fire station into a thriving business.
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Leaders from the Cherokee Nation, Tribal Council and Cherokee Nation Businesses tour “Track 5,” a new honky tonk saloon and live music dance hall inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The venue has a 1,200 square-foot dance floor and a stage for local and national acts.
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Career Services Economic Development Manager Hunter Palmer was selected as a winner in the economic development profession’s 40 Under 40 awards. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Hunter Palmer is a 2018 graduate of the University of Oklahoma’s Economic Development Institution.
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Raychelle Wilson, who holds degrees in botany and biology, inspects plants at Ganulv Gardens a business in Peggs dedicated to cultivation of medical cannabis. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
RayChelle Wilson and Cherokee Nation citizen Chris Taylor, co-owners of Ganulv Gardens, say they want to test their products and increase production before signing supply contracts. D. SEAN ROWLEY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The medicinal marijuana business is owned and operated by a Cherokee Nation citizen and his partner.
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Ned’s bar is in Tahlequah and is a popular gathering place. Since opening in 1985, it has become a staple in the community. GRANT NEUGIN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Gary Kirkpatrick takes a picture with Flaco, the mascot of Ned’s bar, at the Tahlequah establishment. GRANT NEUGIN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Gary Kirkpatrick inherits the long-standing bar from his parents.
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Release of the design of the 2019 Native American dollar coin featuring Cherokee female engineer Mary Golda Ross on the reverse side. COURTESY
The 2019 coin design celebrates American Indians in the Space Program.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Tanya Butler is a financial advisor with the Edward Jones investment company in Broken Arrow. She works with people to help them achieve their financial goals. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Tanya Butler Edward Jones is a financial advisor with the Edward Jones investment company.
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Cherokee Nation citizen Neal Boatright, left, and his wife Lori are the owners and operators of Urban Station in Fort Gibson. The restaurant, which serves American-fare foods, has been open since March 2017. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Redneck pizza is a specialty pizza that contains a barbecue-based sauce topped with little smokies, bologna, bacon and mozzarella. COURTESY
The Gator pizza is a specialty pizza made with smoked alligator meat, Cajun seasonings and a Cajun corn and bean medley on top of Boudreaux’s Swamp sauce. COURTESY
The daily lunch buffet includes an array of pizza choices and is available from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Urban Station in Fort Gibson. COURTESY
A salad and soup bar is included in the daily lunch buffet from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Urban Station in Fort Gibson. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Urban Station is a two-story business where the restaurant sits on the second floor overlooking downtown Fort Gibson. The business resides in a 112-year-old building with a rustic atmosphere that reflects the building and town’s history. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Urban Station co-owner Lori Boatright serves a young patron his food order on Nov. 13. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A gift shop resides on the first floor of Urban Station in Fort Gibson. Customers can see how the Boatrights are preserving history with the original stenciling on display above the shelves and various historic items lining the walls. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A dessert area along with a toy-and-candy area sit in the north room on the first floor of Urban Station in Fort Gibson. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The goal of Urban Station is to help preserve the town’s history and build its economy.
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Cherokee CRC, a division of Cherokee Nation Businesses, recently completed a two-year project for the construction of two dormitories at Riverside Indian School in Anadarko. The company is now one of seven companies to support a five-year $500 million contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation-owned company is expected to support a $500 million contract.
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