Sowing and Sharing Heirloom Seeds: Caring for Corn

BY JOSH FOURKILLER
Multimedia Specialist
08/20/2020 11:00 AM
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
STILWELL – As the growing season continues, Cherokee Nation citizen Natalie Yeager said her garden is doing “amazing.”

She said her effort planting and caring for her garden has produced an abundant harvest so far.
“It definitely makes all of the work that that you put into gardening disappear whenever you start eating that harvest of the food that you’ve grown,” Yeager said.

She has started the process of what she calls “canning season.” She has canned green beans, pickles, jams and tomatoes. Yeager said she enjoys sharing her harvest with friends and family throughout the growing season and her passion for growing food has been a gift that keeps giving.

Yeager’s heirloom seed garden of White Eagle corn has nearly doubled in size since July.

“The last video it was around two and a half to three foot and now it’s more like six,” she said.
Yeager has noticed differences in the White Eagle corn compared to sweet corn, which she also grows. “The stocks don’t seem to be as thick, but yet the roots are super strong.”

Yeager has been learning to care for the White Eagle corn and uses a pattern of watering to keep it from drying. As the White Eagle corn starts to pollinate, some of the first ears can be seen starting to form.

“That kind of tells me right now that it’s a good time to really start fertilizing and continuing watering. Usually as the corn is forming I will take an organic pesticide that I mix up and I will go through and kind of spray around the corn and on the stalk just to keep worms from eating my crop.”

Caring for the White Eagle corn at this point consists of consistency in watering, fertilizing, and getting rid of pests. Yeager estimates that the White Eagle corn is still about three or four weeks away from the corn becoming ripe. She plans to allow the corn to remain on the stalk to completely dry before harvest.

“I don’t really know how long it will take to dry depending on the weather and all that. I’m pretty excited about the whole process. This is something new that I’m learning as I go and so I hope that you enjoy the process as well.”

Click here to watch the video on our YouTube channel.
About the Author
Multimedia Specialist Josh Fourkiller currently lives in Tahlequah, Oklahoma but calls Stilwell his hometown. He began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in February of 2020. Born and raised in Oklahoma, Josh always knew he wanted to work for the Cherokee p ...
josh-fourkiller@cherokee.org • 918-207-3969
Multimedia Specialist Josh Fourkiller currently lives in Tahlequah, Oklahoma but calls Stilwell his hometown. He began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in February of 2020. Born and raised in Oklahoma, Josh always knew he wanted to work for the Cherokee p ...

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