Cherokee-speaking tour guides enhance Ancient Village

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
08/05/2011 06:53 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Heritage Center tour guide Steven Daugherty demonstrates bow shooting with a Cherokee bow for visitors at the Ancient Village in Park Hill, Okla. He is one of two Cherokee-speaking guides for the Ancient Village. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Heritage Center tour guide J.D. Ross explains how a Cherokee blowgun is made and used for during a tour of the Ancient Village in Park Hill, Okla. He is one of two Cherokee-speaking guides for the village. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Heritage Center tour guide J.D. Ross explains how turtle shell shackles are made and used for a Cherokee stomp dance during a tour of the Ancient Village in Park Hill, Okla. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Visitors to the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Ancient Village listen to tour guide J.D. Ross explain how Cherokee people constructed their homes in the 1700s. Also listening are Ancient Village Supervisor Tommy Wildcat, center, and tour guide Steven Daugherty. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
PARK HILL, Okla. – It’s as it should be in the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Ancient Village because the Cherokee language is being spoken and heard daily.

Village tour guides J.D. Ross and Steven Daugherty, both fluent Cherokee speakers, use the language to explain the culture and traditions showcased in the village while using their first language.

This is the second year the men are serving as Cherokee-speaking tour guides.

Ross, of the Greasy Community in Adair County, said he enjoys speaking Cherokee and teaching others the language but finds it unfortunate that not many Cherokee-speaking people visit the village.

“Since we do most of these tours in English, it’s just passing some history on, how the Cherokee people lived back in the 1700s. That’s the century we are concentrating on right now,” he said.
He added that he and Daugherty take time to share Cherokee beliefs, traditions and the “old ways.”

Ross said some visitors want translations of English phrases, and the guides try to accommodate them, consulting with each other to ensure the translation is correct.

Visitors from around the world visit the Ancient Village, Ross said, with some relating to Cherokee customs and traditions because of similarities to their own traditions or customs.

“Sometimes we talk to them and just kind of compare notes,” he said. “Some linger back and kind of give us of little history of their heritage and their background.”

Daugherty, of the Bell Community in Adair County, said he welcomed the chance to return to the village to serve as a guide. He too wishes more Cherokee speakers would visit so that he and Ross could converse with them.

He said he does not mind helping non-Cherokee speakers who ask for translations. But he emphasized the guides are not able to spend time attempting to translate English names to Cherokee.

Daugherty said he wants visitors to know two things before they leave the village: how Cherokee people lived in the 1700s and that the language is still spoken.

Recently, the village was re-configured to reflect Cherokee life in 1710 rather than the 1600s as in previous years. There are plans to expand the village and hire more villagers to staff it, possibly within the next year.

A grant from the International Museum of Library Studies in Washington, D.C., helped get the language tours started, said Ancient Village Supervisor Tommy Wildcat.

“We thought it was very important to continue with the language tours,” he said.

He added that he thought it was important to rehire Ross and Daugherty because of their experience. Wildcat said the two guides are now more comfortable in their roles, easily entertain visitors and a valuable part of making the Ancient Village more authentic for visitors.

“It’s been a great success because we have a lot of people experiencing the Cherokee language,” he said.

Wildcat said the tours would continue through September. An introductory language tour is available at regular admission every Tuesday through Saturday at 1:30 p.m. For fluent Cherokee speakers and Cherokee language students, a complete and complimentary immersion tour can be reserved between Tuesday and Saturday. Tours are 30-45 minutes long.

Ross and Daugherty guide visitors through the village, stopping at nine stations where they or other villagers demonstrate basket making, bow and arrow making, the stickball game, flint knapping and the Cherokee blowgun. The guides also explain the Cherokee stomp dances and how the dances are performed.

Wildcat said for 44 years the Ancient Village has been sharing Cherokee culture with the world, but more importantly, it serves as a classroom for young Cherokee people to get hands-on training in how to make traditional Cherokee tools such as bows and arrows, blowguns and darts, arrowheads, baskets and pottery. Some former students have become award-winning artists and pass on the knowledge they learned as villager.

“Many have come through here learning these unique traditions perpetuated here by the villagers,” Wildcat said.

For more information, call 918-456-6007, ext. 6148, or email Susan Cro at susan-cro@cherokee.org.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎠᏭᏂᏴᏍᏗ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.-- ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸ ᎠᏰᏟ ᏃᎴ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏛᎩᏍᎪᎢ ᏂᏚᎩᏨᏂᏒᎢ.

ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ J.D Ross ᎠᎴ Steven Daugherty, ᎢᏧᎳ ᎧᎵ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ, ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎪ ᏓᏂᏃᎯᏎᎰ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏓᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᎿᏂ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎪ ᏣᎳᎩᎭᎢ.

ᏔᎵᏁᏃ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏓ ᏃᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎲ ᏴᏫ ᎠᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙ
ᏗᏂᏃᎯᏎᎸᏁᎯ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎭ.

Ross, ᎾᎿ ᎪᎢ ᎾᎥ ᏄᎾᏓᎴᏫᏒ ᎡᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏫᏍᎦᎸ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᏩᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎬᏪᏲᏗ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᎠᏩᏘᏍᎪ Ꮭ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᏯᏁᏙᎰ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ.

“ᏂᎦᏓᏊᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᏓᏂᏃᎯᏎᎲ ᏲᏁᎦᎭ ᎨᏐ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎧᏃᎯᏎᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎤᎾᏕᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏣᎦᏎᏍᏗᎭ ᏃᏊ ᎨᏒ.” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.

ᏃᎴᏍᏊ Ross ᎠᎴ Daugherty ᏓᏂᏃᎯᏎᎸᏁᎭ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎪᎯᏓ ᎨᏒ, ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ “ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏂᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ.”

Ross ᎤᏛᏅ ᎢᎦᏓ ᎠᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎪ ᎠᏁᎳᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏲᏁᎦ ᎦᏬᏂᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙ ᎠᎾᏁᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᎤᎾᏁᎳᏙᏗ, ᏓᎾᏓᏛᏛᎲᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦᏪᏍᏗ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎠᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᏁᏛ ᏂᏙᏓᏳᏂᎶᏒ ᎠᏁᏙᎰ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ross, ᎢᎦᏓ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎪ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎲ ᎤᏅᏌ ᎤᏠᏯᏮᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏐ ᎠᏯ ᎢᎩᎲᎢ.

“ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᏙᏍᏓᏟᏃᎮᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏠᏱ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏐ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.“ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎠᎾᏕᎯᏯᏍᎪ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏁᏙᎲ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸᎢ.”

Daugherty, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᎭᎸᏂ ᎾᎥ ᏄᎾᏓᎴᏫᏒ ᎡᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏫᏍᎦᎵ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᎠᏁᏙᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᏕᎦᏂᎳᏕᎰ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᏓᏘᏂᏙᎲ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎬᏩᏃᎮᏓ ᎨᏒ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏓᏘᏂᏙᎲᎢ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎪ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏟᏃᎮᏙᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᏝᏃ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏰᎵᏍᎪ ᏧᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏧᏟᏃᎮᏙᏗ ᎬᏩᏛᏛᎲᏍᎬ ᎠᏁᎸᏙᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ Ꮭ ᎡᎵ ᏳᎾᏜᏅᏓᏕᎰ ᎤᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᏲᏁᎦ ᏚᎾᏙᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏧᏅᏁᏗᎢ.

Daugherty ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎠᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙ ᏔᎵ ᎢᏳᏓᎴ ᎤᎾᏅᏗ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ Ꮟ ᏄᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ: ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏚᎾᏁᎳᏛ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏎ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮟ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎾᏝᎬᏊ, ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏁᏟᏴᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏄᏅᏁᎸ ᎾᏃ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏥᎨᏒ ᏓᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᎨᏒ. ᏏᏃ ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖ ᎤᎾᏔᏃᎯᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏧᏂᎾᏢᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ , ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᎭ. ᎠᏕᎳ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏗᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᏗᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏩᏒᏓᏃᎢ, D.C., ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏗᏕᎦ Tommy Wildcat.

“ᎣᏣᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎬᎵᏱᎵᏒ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᏗᎧᏃᎯᏎᎸᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎯᎢᏃ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᎤᎵᏍᎬᏗ ᏱᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏙᎦᎾᏢᏗ Ross ᎠᎴ Daugherty ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎾᎥ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᏚᎾᏛᏏᏗᏒᎢ. Wildcat ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎤᎾᏅᏔ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗ, ᎠᎯᏓ ᏄᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᎰ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᏧᏂᏃᏎᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.
“ᎣᏍᏓᏃ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᏂᎦᏙᎲᏍᎪ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Wildcat ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏚᎢᏓ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏚᎵᏍᏗ ᎧᎸ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ. ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎾᏅᏁᎲ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏘᏁᎦ ᎠᎵᏍᏚᎢᏍᎪ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎠᏴᏍᏙᏗ ᏔᎵᏁᎢᎦ ᏂᏕᎦᎵᏍᏔᏁᎬ ᎤᏙᏓᏈᏕᎾ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏌᏊ ᎠᏰᏟ ᏒᎯᏰᏯᏗᏟ. ᎧᎵ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ, ᎧᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏙᏗ ᏧᏂᎾᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏗᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᎨᏐ ᏔᎵᏁᎢᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏙᏓᏈᏕᎾ. ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏓᎾᏘᏂᏙᎲ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᏦᏍᎪᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏳᏔᏬᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

Ross ᎠᎴ Daugherty ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎰ ᎠᏁᏙ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ, ᏐᏁᎳ ᏂᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏓᎾᎴᏫᏍᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏃ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏔᎷᏣ, ᎦᎵᏣᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏟᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏁᏦᏍᎪ, ᏓᏫᏍᎦᎵ ᏅᏯ ᎠᏅᏗᎪ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏇᏍᏗ. ᎯᎠ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᏓᏂᏃᏎᎸᏁᎰ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᎩᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎪ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ.

Wildcat ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᏯᏙᎯᎲ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛᎢ ᏂᏙᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᏚᏂᏃᎯᏎᎳ, ᎤᎪᏛᏃ ᎤᎵᏍᎬᏗᏴ, ᎾᏍᎩᏯᏮ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎩᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏥᎨᏎ ᏯᏛᎾ ᎦᎵᏣᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏟᏓ, ᏚᏇᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏲᏍᏙᏗ, ᏓᏫᏍᎦᎵ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᏗᎦᏟᏗ ᎢᏧᏅᏙᏗ, ᏔᎷᏣ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏓᎫᎫ. ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᏫᏛᎭ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏌᏍᏛ ᎤᏂᎩᏌ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎾᎿ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ. “ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᎶᏌ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎠ Ꮭ ᏳᏅᎨᏫᏍᎪ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏗᎩᎶᏒᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Wildcat.

ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵ, ᏂᏓᏣᏟᏃᎮᏓ 918-456-6007, ext. 6148, or email Susan Cro at susan-cro@cherokee.org.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He e ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He e ...

Culture

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/10/2019 10:43 AM
The group and students work to preserve ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/05/2019 03:34 PM
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BY STAFF REPORTS
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BY D. SEAN ROWLEY
Senior Reporter
05/29/2019 08:16 AM
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BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
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Morels are mushrooms that ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2019 08:31 AM
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