3 named Cherokee National Treasures

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
09/13/2013 10:02 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Flutist and cultural specialist Tommy Wildcat plays his flute for a crowd at the Cherokee Capital Square in during a recent Tahlequah, Okla., event. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee beadwork artist and Cherokee National Treasure Martha Berry, center right, discusses beaded bandolier bags beaded during a 2007 beadwork revival project. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee artist Donald Vann signs prints of his work he gave away during a recent Tribal Council meeting in which he was given a Cherokee Warriors Medal. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Three Cherokee artists were honored as Cherokee National Treasures this year before the Cherokee National Holiday during Labor Day weekend.

One is a talented painter. One is a beadwork artist who brought Southeast beadwork back to the Cherokee people, and the other is a river cane flute maker and cultural specialist.

Painter Donald Vann, 63, grew up in Stilwell in Adair County mimicking the drawings of his uncles. He spent time in nature camping and hunting with his grandfather. Those memories would one day become a part of his paintings.

Shortly before his high school graduation, he dropped out and enlisted in the U.S. Army. Vann served in the Vietnam War with the 1st Calvary Aviation Division as a door gunner on a helicopter, dropping off and extracting soldiers from the battlefield.

After the Army, he began his art career painting the images of his Cherokee heritage. As Native American art’s popularity grew in the 1970s, Vann’s skills were in demand, and he soon found himself with a business partner starting a publishing company called Nuwoduhi Galleries, later renamed Native American Images. Before long, Vann’s artwork was displayed in galleries across the world, on television shows and movies and in the homes and offices of private collectors.

“If I can make people see with their hearts and feel with their eyes, then I have succeeded,” he said.

Today, Vann makes his home and studio in Tahlequah with his family. He takes the occasional tour of galleries across the country, but most of his work is now showcased and sold online, including originals, prints and even low-cost posters.

“Of all the awards I have received throughout my 53 year career, receiving one from my peers and the Cherokee Nation have meant the most to me,” Vann said of the National Treasure Award. “I am honored and thankful.”

Beadwork artist Martha Berry was born and raised in Tulsa. Her grandmother and mother taught her to sew and embroider at age 5, and she later became a professional seamstress. Berry creates elaborately beaded bandolier bags, moccasins, belts, knee bands, purses and sashes inspired by the styles of Southeastern tribes, including the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole, Yuchi and Alabama. Her work is displayed in museums throughout the country.

“When I was first told I had been designated, I thought I’d feel a real sense of completion. Now that it is here, my feeling is much more one of rededication,” Berry said. “I've always wanted to do good work, in order to build my own name. But now, it isn’t just my name on my work. I now represent all the other National Treasures and the Cherokee people as a whole. I’m anxious to do even better work, to continue to live up to the honor and trust that has now been placed in me.”

Berry, 65, of Tyler, Texas, taught herself the craft of beading and continues to research the beadwork of Southeastern tribes. She said Cherokee beadwork evolved from the trade network Cherokee people established with white traders in the 1600s. Glass seed beads, steel needles, silk thread and ribbon and cloth made of wool were traded for or bought from Europeans. By the late 1700s, Cherokee bead workers were skilled at their craft using trade materials.

After 1840, Cherokee beadwork and the number of Cherokee bead workers dwindled due mostly to the forced removal of the Cherokees from their Southeastern homelands in 1838-39. Berry said following the removal the Cherokee people had no place in their lives for luxury items such as beaded moccasins, belts and leggings.

She is credited with helping bring back beadwork to the Cherokee people and teaches others her craft.

“Although this is the highest honor I have ever received, or will ever receive, I do not feel it closes a circle at all. I feel a rejuvenation, a vigor and an anticipation for the future. I want to make beautiful things. I want to teach more and more people to do the same, and I want to grow more and more teachers of traditional Cherokee beadwork. This wonderful moment is just the beginning,” Berry said.

Cherokee flutist and cultural specialist Tommy Wildcat of Park Hill has educated people about Cherokee culture since 1988. He works for the Cherokee Nation as a cultural specialist and travels the country with the CN and on his own to share Cherokee culture, language and history. He also shares traditional Cherokee songs using his five-holed Cherokee river can flutes, which he makes by hand.

Wildcat, 46, was honored as “Flutist of the Year” at the 2002 Native American Music Awards. His music is heard in CN facilities and at many historic sites in northern Georgia.

“I’m very honored to be a National Treasure. It brings back the many years with my father (Tom), a National Treasure, of the 25 years of learning and teaching our heritage to family and friends, and the thousands of venues that I toured by myself or with my father, family or friends,” Wildcat said. “I’m very happy and grateful for this honor.”

The Cherokee National Treasure project began in 1988 to honor artisans and preserve and revive artistic practices that may be lost from one generation to the next. They are selected because they have shown skill, cultural and historical knowledge and are committed to education and cultural preservation.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᏦᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᏗ ᎨᎦᎵᎡᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏓ ᎠᎬᏯᏗᏢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᏘᏱᏍᎬ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎬ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏒᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᏌᏊ ᎠᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᎠᏑᏫᏍᎬ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎪ. ᏌᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᎠᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᏂᏓᏳᏫᏛᏓ ᎤᎦᎾᏩᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎲ ᎤᏲᏢᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᎲ, ᎠᎴ ᏐᎢ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎯᏯ ᏗᎪᏢᏗᏍᎩ ᎦᏤᏡᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎦᏔᎯ.

ᎠᏑᏫᏍᎬ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎩ, ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᏦᎢ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎤᏛᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏍᏗᎵᏫᎵ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏍᎦᎵ ᏍᏚᎦᎩ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎨ ᎤᏚᏣ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ.ᎤᎪᏛ ᎢᎾᎨ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏁ ᎤᏒᎯᎮ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏃᎭᎵᏙᎮ ᎤᏚᏓ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᎯ. ᎯᎠ ᎠᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬ ᏌᏊ ᎢᎦ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎨᎢ.

ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏍᏗ ᎤᎷᎸ ᏧᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, ᎤᏑᎵᎪᏨ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᏪᎳᏅ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏂᏲᏍᎩ. Vann ᏭᏪᏙᎸ Vietnam ᎠᏓᎾᏩ ᏚᎵᎪᏅ 1st Calvary Aviation Division ᎾᎿ ᎦᎶᏍᏗ ᎦᎶᏇ ᎬᏗᏍᎩ helicopter, ᏓᏠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᏙᎫᏖᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏟᎲ ᎡᎳᏓ.

ᎢᎤᎷᏣ ᎤᏲᏏᏙᎸ, ᎤᎴᏅᎲ ᏓᏑᏫᏍᎬ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᎯ. ᏃᏊᏃ ᎠᏂᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏁᎲ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎬ ᎤᏛᏒ ᏚᏓᏃᏣᎸ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ. Vann ᎠᎦᏙᏒ ᏃᏊ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏗ ᎤᏩᏛᎲᎢ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᏗᏂᎴᏴᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᏙᎥ ᏄᏬᏚᎯ Galleries, ᎣᏂᏃ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏚᏃᎥ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎯ. Ꮭ ᏳᏬᎯᏤ, Vann’s ᎤᏑᏫᏒᏅ ᎤᏂᏝᎾᎥ ᎾᎿ galleries ᏂᎬ ᎡᎶᎯ, ᎠᏓᏴᎳᏛᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏴᎳᏛᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ movies ᎠᎴ ᏚᏁᏅᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏤᏟᏓ ᎤᏂᏩᏍᎩ.

“ᎢᏳᏃ ᎢᎦᎦᏥᏴᏗ ᏱᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏙ ᎬᏗ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏒᏂᏍᏗ ᏗᏂᎦᏙ ᎬᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏯᎩᏍᏆᏓ,” ᎤᏛᏅ.

ᎪᎯᎢᎦ, Vann ᎤᏪᏅᏒ ᎤᏬᏢ ᎠᎴ studio ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᏚᏓᏘᎾᎥᏅ. ᏴᏓᎭᏃ ᎡᏙᎵᏙᎰ galleries ᏕᎪᏢᏒ ᏕᏙᎭ ᏂᎬ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏂᎦᏓᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏍᎪᎸᏙ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒᎢ, ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏗᏑᏫᏓ, ᏧᎴᏴᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏲᏟ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅ.

“ᏂᎦᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎬᏆᎵᎮᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏕᎬᎩᏅᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎯᏍᎦᏍᎪ ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᏆᏛᏁᎸ, ᎠᎩᏁᏒ ᏌᏊ ᏂᏓᏳᏅᏅ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎦ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏭᎪᏛ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎬᎢ ᏅᏍᎩᎾ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Vann ᎾᎿᏃᏊ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ ᎨᎳ ᏃᏊ. “ᎢᎦ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ."

ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᏗᎪᏢᏍᎩ Martha Berry ᎤᏕᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏛᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎳᏏᎢ. ᎤᎵᏏᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏥ ᎬᏪᏲᏅ ᎤᏩᏱᏫᏒᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᏚ ᎢᏳᏩᏅᏗ ᎤᏩᏱᏫᏒᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᎣᏂᏃ ᎤᏩᎪᏛ ᎠᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᎤᏩᏱᏫᏒ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ. Berry ᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᏧᏬᏚᎯ ᎠᏕᏯ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᏕᎦᎶᏗ, ᏗᎳᏑᎶ, ᏗᏓᏠᏍᏗ, ᎠᏂᏂᎨᎾ ᎤᎾᏢᏍᏙᏗ, ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᎦᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏬ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᏗᏓᏠᏍᏗ ᎣᏏ ᏓᏱᎸᎾᏁᎲ ᎤᎦᎾᏩᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᏓ, ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ, ᎠᏂᎫᏌ, ᎠᏂᏣᏗ, ᎠᏂᏥᎦᏌ, ᎠᏂᏏᎹᏃᎵ, Yuchi ᎠᎴ Alabama. ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᏂᎬᎢ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎤᏂᏝᎾᎣᎢ.

“ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏆᏛᎦᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏆᏑᏱᏒ, ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏖᎸ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏓᏛ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᏥᎧᎵ ᏃᏊ ᏥᎨᏐᎢ. ᏃᏊ ᎦᎷᎦ, ᎠᏆᏕᎯᏌᏅᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Berry . “ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎬ, ᏓᏆᏙᎥ ᎤᎾᏄᎪᏍᏗi. ᎠᏎᏃ ᏃᏊ, Ꮭ Ꮩ ᏓᏆᏙᎥᏊ ᎢᎦᎢ ᏱᎩ. ᏂᎦᏓ ᏂᎦᏥᏚᏁᎭ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎧᎵᎢ. ᎤᏪᎵᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏔ ᏓᏤᏢ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ, ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎥᏆᎨᏅᏛ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏆᎵᎮᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏯ.”

Berry, ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎶᏘᏴᏓ, Tyler ᏅᏓᎩ ᎡᎯ, ᎤᏩᏌ ᎤᏓᏕᏲᏅ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏓᏢᏓ ᏕᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐ ᎤᏲᎲ ᎾᎿ ᎢᏗᎬᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᏗᎪᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎢᏳᏅᏃᏗ. ᎤᏛᏅ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᏃᏢᏍᎬ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᏓᎾᎵᏱᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎤᏃᏢᏁ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎮ ᎠᎾᎵᏱᏛᎲᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ. ᏕᎵᏙ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ , ᏔᎷᎩᏍᎩ ᏴᎦ, ᏏᎳᎩ ᎠᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏇᏡᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏄᏬ ᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᎤᏩᏂ ᎠᎾᎵᏱᏗᏍᎨ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏩᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᎦᎵᏏᎢ. ᎣᏂᎯᎨᏍᏗ ᎦᎵᏆᏛ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᏗᏃᏢᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎨᏎ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᎾᎵᏱᏛᏅ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎣᏂᏃ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᎠᏃᏢᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎬ ᎾᏂᎥ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏅᏔᏅᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᎦᏲᎶᏤ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏥᏱᎳᏫᏛᎲᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎧᎸᎬ ᏚᏧᏁᏅᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎠᎴ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. Berry ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏩᏕᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏕᎨᏥᎧᎲᏒ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎾᎿ Ꮭ ᎢᎸᏢ ᏳᏙᏢᏎ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᏂᏱᎸᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏧᎾᏅᏬᏍᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎢᏗᎬᏗ ᏗᎳᏑᎶ, ᎠᏓᏠᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏂᏅᏍᎨᎾ ᎢᏧᏅᏃᏗ.

ᎠᎦᎵᎡᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏓᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᏲᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᎴ ᏕᎨᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ.

“ᏙᎯᏳ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᎠᎦᎵᎡᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎩᏁᏌ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎩᏁᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎩᏁᏍᏗᎢ, ᏝᏃ ᎤᏍᏗᏊ ᏯᏓᏕᏯᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏍᏂ ᎤᎦᎵᏍᏗ, ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎠᏮᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏫᏗᎦᏛᎢ. ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎤᏬᏚ ᎠᏉᏢᏅᏗ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ. ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᏗᏆᏕᏲᏗ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎠᏆᏛᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎪᎯᎩ ᏥᏂᏚᏍᏕ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᏃᏢᏅᎢ. ᎯᎠ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎬᏊ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Berry.

ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎦᏤᏡᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᏄᏔᏂ Tommy Wildcat ᎾᎿ Park Hill ᎡᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏪᏲᎾ Ꭰ.ᏴᏫ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸ ᏂᏓᎬᏩᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎪᎯᎩ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᏅᏔ ᎠᎴ ᎡᏙᎵᏙᎰ ᏂᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎬᎾᏅᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏩᏌ ᏕᎧᏃᏎᎭ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏗᎩᎶᏒ, ᏃᏩᎴ ᎢᎩᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏅᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ. ᎾᏍᏊ ᏕᎧᏃᎯᏎᎰ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏗᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎧᏃᎩᏍᏗ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏗᏔᎴᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏤᏡᎯᏍᏗ ᎢᎯᏯ ᎪᏢᏔᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᎤᏩᏌ ᏧᏬᏰᏂ ᏧᏮᏔᏅᎯ.

Wildcat, ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᏳᎶᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎨᎵᎡᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᏗᎦᏤᏡᎯᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ” ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ Native American Music Awards. ᎯᎢᏃ ᏧᎩᏍᏔᏅ ᏗᏓᏛᎩᏍᎪ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎭᏫᎾᏓᏢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅᎲᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏣᏥᎢ.

“ᎢᎦ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎪ ᎬᎪᎵᎮᎵᏍᏔᏅᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ. ᎢᎦᎷᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏧᏕᏘᏱᎶᏓ ᎡᏙᏓ (Tom), ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᎦᏔᏅᎢ ᎨᏒ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᏍᎩᏦᏁ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏕᏲᏗ ᏗᎦᏓᎴᏅ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᎵ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᏇᏙᎸ ᎠᏇᏌ ᎡᏙᏓ ᎣᎩᎾᎵᎪᎯ, ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏗᏆᎵᎢᏃ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Wildcat. “ᎢᎦᎢ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ ᎯᎠ ᎬᎩᏅᏁᎸᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎤᏓᎴᏅᎲ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎵᎮᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᏂᎦᏯᎢ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᏂᏏᎾᏒ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏧᏁᏲᏗ ᎣᏂ ᎠᏁᎦ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᏐᎢᏃ. ᏓᎾᏑᏱᏍᎪ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎾᏅᏁᎰ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ, ᏄᏍᏛ ᎤᏂᎪᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏅᏔᏅ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏚᏓᎸᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᏲᏗ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏅᏔᏅᏅ ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎢᎩᏲᎱᏎᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He e ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He e ...

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