TOSS conference gives teachers free professional development

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
06/09/2016 08:00 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Stephanie Forister of Angus Valley Elementary School leads the “Building a 21st Century Technology Classroom” seminar on June 7 at the Northeastern State University’s University Center during the Cherokee Nation’s Teachers of Successful Students conference in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The conference provided area schoolteachers with professional development, especially in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. TRAVIS SNELL/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cheryl Hill of Fort Gibson Public Schools conducts her “Making and Tinkering in the Elementary Classroom” professional development session for area schoolteachers on June 7 at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The seminar was part of the Cherokee Nation’s fourth annual Teachers of Successful Students conference held June 7-8. TRAVIS SNELL/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cheryl Hill of Fort Gibson Public Schools talks to area schoolteachers during her “Making and Tinkering in the Elementary Classroom” professional development session held June 7 at the Cherokee Nation’s Teachers of Successful Students conference in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The tribe held the professional development conference at Northeastern State University. TRAVIS SNELL/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Stephanie Forister of Angus Valley Elementary School leads local schoolteachers through her “Building a 21st Century Technology Classroom” session as part of the Cherokee Nation’s Teachers of Successful Students conference on June 7-8 in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. In its fourth year, the tribe offers professional development to the teachers who teach many CN citizens in their respective classrooms around the 14-county jurisdiction. TRAVIS SNELL/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With Oklahoma public schools facing massive budget cuts next fiscal year, Lee Ann Reeves, a Cherokee Nation citizen who teaches seventh and eighth grade language arts at Oklahoma Union, said she appreciated the chance to earn free professional development hours at the tribe’s Teachers of Successful Students conference June 7-8 at Northeastern State University.

“At our school we offer our own professional development for us to get our hours, but a lot of teachers go outside of that to get enrichment,” Reeves said. “When the schools see something that is free they are all for you going.”

Reeves said being a teacher at a school with Cherokee students she wanted to get more information on how to be a better teacher and how to incorporate more strategies in the classroom.

“We have a lot of kids who have tribal cards that go to our school, and so I want to better inform them of some of the Cherokee Nation offerings,” she said. “It shows me different strategies I can use to reach the students who may need a little different way to reach them, strategies I haven’t seen before, I haven’t used, from my instructors as well as other teachers who are in the classroom with me.”

Now in its fourth year, the TOSS conference offers professional development workshops for teachers at public schools located in the tribe’s jurisdiction. The tribe’s Education Services held the conference for at least 150 teachers at NSU’s University Center.

Dr. Gloria Sly, Education Services education liaison, said the initiative is provided through the tribe’s Motor Vehicle Tax funding so that public schoolteachers can focus on areas where schools receive failing grades from the Oklahoma Department of Education.

“It was based on the public schools’ need to have professional development in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) areas because that’s where a lot of them were really failing or receiving F’s, and so we thought we could assist the public schoolteachers and make it accessible to them in this 14-county area because our little schools have just taken cuts and taken cuts, and it’s harder for them to pay for their teachers to go to attend a professional development,” Sly said.

She said the conference also focused on reading and had 79 workshops for five school groups: early childhood, elementary, middle school, junior high and high school. The workshops varied in length from 45 minutes to two hours, and the conference was completely self-contained for convenience, Sly said.

“We keep them self-contained in this building from beginning to end because one year we tried it where they would have to go to another building for a workshop, and all those that traveled back and forth got lost. We ended up with a very small population at the end of the day. So now we keep them in one building,” she said.

Sly added that the tribe pays for housing so teachers who have to drive longer distances don’t have to leave town or pay for hotel rooms.

“We pay for housing for those that come from up north like Nowata, Bluejacket. They come down here and they stay in seminary suites. We pay for that. Northeastern is a partner. As a partner they give us a very good rate. So they’ll come in Tuesday night, the night before, and be here and leave the last day,” she said.

Carrie Steele, a CN citizen and math teacher at Kansas High School, said she appreciated that the conference was free and a short drive for her.

“There is hardly any free training anymore and especially close to home. We always have to go to Tulsa or Oklahoma City. Tahlequah is a great place to have a meeting,” Steele said.

Sly said many teachers get most, if not all, of their professional development for the whole year at the conference.

“Because they have to have 15 hours of professional development, we have 15, 16 hours here,” she said. “What it all boils down to is the achievement of a lot of Cherokee students. We want them to have the best education they can. In order to have the best education they have to have the best teachers. In order to help those teachers to be able to reach our students we do this.”

Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said with the TOSS conference the tribe has assumed a role in giving teachers better tools to teach Cherokee youth.

“As we prepare our citizens for a growing global economy, it’s critical to have a strong academic foundation. TOSS is a unique gathering because it is a chance to share what truly works in classrooms as we try to better engage kids and spark that interest in lifelong learning,” he said.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ. – ᎣᎯᎳᎰᎹ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᏍᏗᏓ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎠᏂᏯᏙᎯᎲᎢ ᎡᏆ ᎤᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗ ᏩᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᎠᏕᏘᏱᏍᎬᎢ, Lee Ann Reeves, ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ ᏗᏂᏂᏃᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ arts ᎥᎿ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ Union, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎣᏏ ᎠᏰᎸᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎩᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏎᏭ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏂᏔᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ of Successful Students ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ 7-8 ᎧᎸᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎤᏴᏢᎢᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᏗᏜ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎥᎿᏃ ᎣᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎣᏣᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᎰᎢ ᎣᎬᏏ ᎣᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎣᎬᏌ ᏦᎩᎩᏍᏗᎢ ᏦᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᎠᏎᎯᎯ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏙᎦᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏂᎪᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Reeves. “ᎾᎯᏳᏃ Ꮎ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏳᎾᏕᎶᎰᏏ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎠᏎᏭᎢ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎪᎢ ᏤᏅᏍᏗᎢ.”

Reeves Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏨᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏱᎩ ᎥᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ Ꮓ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏯᏁᎳ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎨᏃ ᎤᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎬᎦᎧᏃᎮᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᏓᏤᏢᎢ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎴᏅᏗᎢ ᎠᏏ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎯᎸᏍᎩᏃ ᏙᎩᎧᎭ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎣᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏚᏂᎾᎠ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏗᎨᏥᏅᏁᎸᎢ ᏗᏆᏂᏲᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ Ꮓ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᎢ ᏓᏤᏢ ᎬᎦᏥᏃᎯᏎᏗᎢ ᎢᎦᏓ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᏋᏁᎭ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏗ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎥᏝ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᎠᎩᎪᎲᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ, ᎥᏝ ᎠᏋᏔᏅᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᏛᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏤᎵᎢ ᏗᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᏁᎳ ᏦᎦᎵᏲᎭ ᏙᏣᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ,”

ᎾᏊᏃ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎾᎢᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ Ꮎ TOSS ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᎭ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏙᎷᏩᏛᏗᎢ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᎪᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎥᎿ ᎠᏰᎵᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎡᏍᎦᏂ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᎢᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᏓᏁᎲᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᏒᏍᏔᏅ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏛᎢ 150 ᎢᏳᏂᏨᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ NSU’s ᏩᎬᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ.

Dr. Gloria Sly, ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᏔᏂᏙᎯ, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏙᎷᏩᏘᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎥᎿ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎢ Moter Vehicle Tax ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᎬᏩᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎡᏍᎦᏭ Ꮓ ᎤᏂᏄᎸᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏓᏂᏁᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᎿ Department of education ᏂᏙᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ.

“ᎥᎿᏃ ᏓᎳᏏᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᎵᎢ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏎᎢ ᎤᏚᎸᏗ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏙᎷᏩᏙᏗᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ STEM (Scince,technology, engineering and math) ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎥᎿᏃ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏙᎯᏳ ᎤᏂᏄᎸᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ F’s, ᏓᏂᏁᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏃᏤᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎦᏲᏥᏕᎸᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᏰᎵᎢ ᎤᏙᏢᏄᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏛᏅᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎨᏒᎢ 14- ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎢᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏗᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏧᏍᏗᎢ ᏥᏕᎪᏢᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᏂᎦᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏏᏊ ᏓᏂᎦᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏍᏓᏲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏈᏴᎡᏗᎢ ᏚᏂᎧᎲᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᏁᏅᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏁᎳᏗᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏙᎷᏩᏛᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Sly.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏓᏂᎪᎵᏰᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ 79 ᏗᎬᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ: ᎢᎬᏱᏱᎢ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ, ᏧᎾᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ, ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ, ᎩᎳ ᎠᎾᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᏃ ᎯᎸᏍᎩ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏗ ᏙᎦᏅᎯᎬᎢ ᎢᎦᏓ ᏂᏛᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩᏃ 45 ᎢᏯᏔᏬᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏱᎪᎯᏓ ᏔᎵ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᏱᎪᎯᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎧᎵᏬᎯ ᎤᏩᏌᏊ-ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎯ ᏁᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Sly.

“ᎤᏅᏌᏊ-ᎢᏯᎾᏛᏁᎯ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎦᎵᏦᏕᎢ ᎠᏂᏯᎥᎢ ᏂᏛᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏩᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏌᏉᎢ ᎢᏳᏩᎬᏘ ᎣᎦᏁᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᏗᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏭᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗᎢ , ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᎥᏃ ᎠᎾᏨᏏᏰᏍᎬᎢ ᏚᎾᎴᎾᎯᎲᎢ. ᎣᎩᎦᏲᏟᏊ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏩᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎢᎪᎯ. ᎾᏊᏃ ᏌᏉᎢ ᎦᎵᏦᏕᎢ ᎣᏥᏯᎣᎢ,”ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Sly Z ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏢᎢ ᎠᏈᏱᏍᎪᎢ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎢᎾ ᏙᏗᎾᏂᎩᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᏝ ᎠᏎᏱ ᎤᎾᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᏱᎦᎩ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎤᎾᏈᏴᏗ ᏧᏂᏒᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎣᏣᏈᏱᏍᎪᎢ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ Ꮎ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᏗᏜ ᏂᏙᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ Nowata, Bluejacket. ᎠᎭᏂᏃ ᎢᏴᎢ ᎠᏂᎷᎪᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎯᎰᎢ ᎥᎿ seminary suits. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎣᏣᏈᏱᏍᎪᎢ. ᎤᏴᏢᎢᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᎣᎦᎵᏲᎯ ᎪᎩᏁᎰᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎦᎢ ᎠᏈᏴᏗ. ᏔᎵᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎠᏂᎷᎪᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏁᏙᎰᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎵᏍᏆᏟᏗ ᎢᎪᎯ ᎠᎾᏂᎩᏍᎪᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Carrie Steele, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎪᎢ ᎥᎿ Kansas High School, ᎠᎴ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮎ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏎᏭᎢ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎡᏍᎦᏂᏭ ᎨᏒᎩ ᎤᏩᏌᏊ ᎤᏂᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎤᏎᎦᏦᎢ ᎠᏎᏭ ᎨᏐᎢ ᎠᎵᏏᎾᏫᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏦᏪᏅᏒᎢ ᎾᎥᎢ. ᏂᎪᎯᎸᏃ Tulsa ᎠᎴᏱᎩ Oklahoma City ᏬᎨᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏐᎢ. ᏓᎵᏆᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎡᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᏠᎯᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Steele.

Sly Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎪᏙᎢ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎪᎢ, ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ, ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎪᎷᏩᏛᏗ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᏂᎦᏅᎯᏒᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ.

“ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᏎᎢ 15 ᎤᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᏎ ᏧᏂᎩᏍᏗ, ᎠᎭᏂᏃ ᎨᏒ 15,16 ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᎭᏂ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏥᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏟᏂᎬᏁᎸᏃ ᏥᎩ ᎤᏂᎪᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ. ᎣᎦᏚᎵᏃ ᏫᏓᏤᏢᎢ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏫᏓᏤᏢᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏎᎢ ᏫᏓᎾᏤᏢᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᏯᏂᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎬᏍᎸᏗ Ꮎ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏧᏁᏲᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎯᎠ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎰᎢ.”

Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ TOSS ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏄᏁᎵᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏂᏁᎲᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏓᏤᏢᎢ ᎬᏩᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᏧᏁᏲᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏙᏣᏅᎢᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ ᏦᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᎠᏁᎳ ᎧᏁᏉᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛᎢ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᏄᏍᏗᏗᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏚᏟᏗ ᎤᏟᏂᎩᏓ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏓᎫᏍᏛᏍᎩ. TOSS Z ᏭᏓᎪᎾᏛᏛ ᏗᏠᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᏢᏅᏓᏗᎲᎢ ᎠᏯᏙᎢᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏙᎨᎲᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎣᏣᏁᏟᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏦᏤᏲᏗᎢ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏳᎾᏚᏟᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏱᎪᎯᏓᏊ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

About the Author
Travis Snell has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2000. He began as a staff writer, a position that allowed him to win numerous writing awards from the Native American Journalists Association, including the Richard LaCourse Award for best investigative story in 2003. He was  ...
TRAVIS-SNELL@cherokee.org • 918-453-5358
Travis Snell has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2000. He began as a staff writer, a position that allowed him to win numerous writing awards from the Native American Journalists Association, including the Richard LaCourse Award for best investigative story in 2003. He was ...

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