3 Cherokee medical students look to serve their people

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
09/18/2019 08:45 AM
Audio Clip
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee medical students Breanna Carlson, left, Sheridan Evans and Ryan Young will begin their second year of medical school this fall at the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Breanna Carlson
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Sheridan Evans
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Ryan Young
TULSA – Three Cherokee students are among second-year medical students at the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Breanna Carlson, 24, of Tulsa; Sheridan Evans, 25, of Owasso; and Ryan Young, 22, of Tahlequah, will begin their second year this fall and face a challenging semester.

“The study level was in very immense amounts, more than I ever thought, during first year. I thought undergrad was hard, but the first year of medical school was a mental reality check of what we are getting ourselves into,” Carlson said.

Evans said she took 15 hours a semester while taking undergraduate classes at the University of Oklahoma, mixing science classes and non-science classes.

“In medical school, you’re in 25 hours of just pure, hard science courses, and it’s definitely a shock,” she said. “You can’t really know until you’re in it, what it’s going to be like.”

Young agreed with Carlson and Evans about how surprising it was that medical school requires many science classes and much studying.

They said out of 116 students who started in their class, some dropped out for various reasons, including family and academics.

Carlson and Evans said students must prioritize their studies and have a good support system that understands the students’ priorities are their studies if they are to become medical doctors.

Young said the classes he took as an undergrad student helped prepare him for the rigorous courses he’s taking. He said he spoke with an OSU medical school graduate who is now a practicing physician (Dr. Doug Nolan), who told him medical school would be difficult but possible.

OSU COM is one of 44 osteopathic medical schools in the nation. Two-thirds of the graduates practice in primary care (family practice, pediatrics, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology) and one-third practice in specialty areas such as dermatology, neurology, surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, ophthalmology, psychiatry, anesthesiology and gastroenterology.

Evans said an OSU-trained physician saved her father’s life, which is a reason she wanted to attend the school, and OSU COM is the only medical school she applied to attend.

Carlson took a roundabout route to medical school.

“I started out as a music major. Freshman year (at the University of Tulsa) I started thinking more seriously about my career, and I decided to go into medical because I enjoyed chemistry,” she said. “It turned out shadowing doctors was really exciting and fun, and I just developed a passion to become a doctor. That was my journey.”

Young took science classes while attending Northeastern State University. “Then I decided to shadow a physician. I enjoyed anatomy and physiology classed, loved them, and so that’s what led me here,” Young said.

Carlson is using an Indian Health Service scholarship to attend medical school and will be required to practice medicine for four years in an IHS facility when she graduates.

“I’m currently working at Claremore Indian Hospital this summer, and I’ve shadowed Dr. (Krystina) Beaman, she’s in internal medicine, and that’s a career I never considered, and seeing her work it’s really awesome,” she said.

She said she would like to work at Claremore or at W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah.

Evans said Dr. Nolan also was her mentor, but she’s undecided about a medical specialty.

“There’s like orthopedics, general surgery, cardio, internal medicine,” she said.

Young said he would like to practice medicine in Tahlequah or at a rural hospital, but he’s not sure on his specialty yet. He said he and his fellow students will have the option to study at the medical school being built by OSU on the Hastings Hospital campus that will open next year. He said students will have the option of doing clinical rotations and residency visits at the hospital as they progress in and graduate from medical school.

The OSU facility will be on the hospital’s grounds and will be the first medical school on tribal land, with a tribal affiliation, in the United States. The facility will include state-of-the-art classrooms, lecture halls and cutting-edge technologies, including medical simulations.

All three students are open to the possibility of working at the 469,000-square-foot Hastings facility, which will open adjacent to the current hospital, or working in the current hospital.

For them, the possibility of working to serve their people as medical professionals goes back to them appreciating their Cherokee heritage.

Carlson, a direct descendant of Sequoyah, participated in the “Remember the Removal” Bike Ride in 2017 and learned much about her ancestry and heritage.

Evans said for her heritage, she knows who her ancestor is on the Dawes Roll, but her great-grandmother, fearing discrimination, told everyone she was Italian to explain her dark skin, which is why she said her family missed knowing more about their Cherokee heritage.

“So when in I was in undergrad, my minor was in Native American studies, and I took Cherokee language courses and tried to get find more information about my heritage,” she said.

Evans serves as the vice president of Association of Native American Medical Students at the OSU COM.

Young grew up in Tahlequah and took part in Cherokee Nation-sponsored events such as “Camp Cherokee” where he was a counselor and learned more about his culture and heritage.

Since shifting to medicine from music, Carlson said she continues to receive affirmations that she made the correct choice.

“It’s actually been a natural road for me. It hasn’t been super forced. I still stayed in music (at TU), so having to balance my bachelor’s of arts with my pre-med work and taking extra hours with my chemistry minor seemed impossible, but since I made that decision the road has been kind of clear,” she said.

She said shadowing doctors and seeing how things work as well as her parents supporting her as she continues studying also reinforced her decision to study medicine.

Evans said she wants to be a doctor because she had three surgeries by the time she was 17, and during that time her physician was “really comforting” for her and made her “feel secure.”

Young’s mother had a heart condition when he was about 5, and he said talking to her he understands her doctor “took phenomenal care of her.”

“To make that kind of impact he made in my life, I’d like to make that in someone else’s (life),” he said.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏛᎵᏏᎢ – ᏦᎢ ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎥᎿ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏓᏏᏓᏗᏍᎩ ᏅᏬᏘ.

Breanna Carlson, 24, ᏛᎵᏏᎢ ᎡᎯ; Sheridan Evans, 25, ᎣᏩᏌ ᎡᎯ; ᎠᎴ Ryan Young, 22, ᏓᎵᏆ ᎡᎯ, ᏛᎾᎴᏅᎯ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎢᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎵᎪᎲᏍᏗ ᎢᎦᏃ ᎦᏁᏄᎵ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏩᎾᎴᏅᎲᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏓᏍᏈᏍᏙᏒᏃ, ᎤᎪᏗᏃ ᎥᏝᏃ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏱᎨᎵᏍᎨᎢ, ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᎠᏕᏘᏱᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏆᎴᏅᎭ. ᎢᏱᏱ ᎦᏁᏍᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᏍᏓᏰᏍᏗ ᎨᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏂᏗᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᏍᏈᏯ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎯᎶᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ Ꮩ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎲᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Carlson.

Evens ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ 15 ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᏚᏕᎶᏆᎡᎢ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏱᏅᏓ ᏱᎪᎯᏓ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᏓᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᎿ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᏓᏑᏰᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᏅᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ.

“ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, 25 ᎢᏧᏟᎶᏓ ᏫᏓᏍᏓᏴ ᎠᏕᎶᎪᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎦᏁᏄᏟ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎥᏝ ᏱᎦᏲᏅᏔ ᏙᎤᏍᏕᏍᏗ ,ᎩᎳ ᎬᏂ ᎥᎿ ᏱᏫᎦᎷᏣ.”

Young Ꮓ ᏕᎦᎫᏍᏛᏍᎬᎢ Carlson ᎠᎴ Evans ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏈᏂᎬᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏎᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᏈᏍᏙᏒᎢ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎠᏥᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ.

ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎬᏃ 116 ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ, ᎢᎦᏓ ᎯᎸᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᏚᏓᎴᎢ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᎤᏂᏑᎳᎪᏣ,

ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ.

Carlson ᎠᎴ Evans ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᏎᎢ ᏧᎾᏑᏰᏏᏓᏍᏗ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᎦᏎᏍᏛ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏂᎪᏗᎢ ᏕᎦᎫᏍᏓᎡᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏃᏟᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᏑᏰᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏓᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᏳᏃ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏂᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᏱᏂᏛᎾᎵᏍᏔᏂ.

Young Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏚᏑᏰᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗ ᎤᏕᎸᎲᎢ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎦᏁᏄᏟ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᏃᎮᏢᎢ OSU ᏅᏬᏘ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎣᏅᎢ ᏧᏍᏆᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏃᏊᏥᎩ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ (Dr. Doug Nolan) ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏃᎯᏎᎲᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᎦ ᏍᏓᏱ ᎠᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏎᏅ ᏱᏅᏛᎦ ᎤᏛᏁᎢ.

OSU COM ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏌᏉ ᎢᎩ 44 ᏱᎦᎢ ᏚᏙᏢᎭ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᏔᎵ-ᏦᎢ ᏗᎪᏣᎴᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᎵᎩᏐᏗᎰᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏓᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ (ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᏧᎾᏍᏗᎢ, ᏧᎾᏔᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏓᎾᎷᎸᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ) ᎠᎴ ᏌᏉᎢ-ᏦᎢ ᎪᏣᎴᏓ ᎠᎾᎵᎩᏐᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎣᏁᎦᎸᎢ, ᎥᎦᏟᎲᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏍᎪᎵ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᎢ, ᏗᎾᏓᏰᏠᎯ, ᎠᎾᏓᎦᏖᏃᎯ ᏗᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ, ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ, ᏨᎬᏙᎵ ᏗᏂᎪᎵᏰᏍᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎳᏅᏘᏍᎩ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ, ᎣᏓᏅᏛᎢ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᏙᎩᏧᎸᎢ ᏂᏕᎦᎵᏍᎩᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎦᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗ.

Evans ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ OSU- ᎤᎵᏏᎾᎯᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᏙᏓ ᎬᏅᎢ ᎤᏍᏕᎸᎲᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏰᏟᏗ ᏧᏚᎸᎮᎢ ᏧᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ OSU COM ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏩᏌ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏚᎧᎵᏏᏌᏅᎢ ᏧᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

Carlson ᎾᏍᎩᏯᎢ ᏄᏛᏁᎴᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᏚᏕᎶᏆᎡᎢ.

“ᏗᎧᏃᎩᏍᏗ ᏛᏩᎴᏅᎲᎢ. ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ (ᎥᎿ ᏛᎵᏏᎢ ᏩᎬᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ) ᎠᏆᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏢᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᏓᎦᏛᏁᎵᏒᎢ ᏗᏩᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏓᏭᎪᏔᏅᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᏗᏩᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏛᎢ chemistry,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎦᏥᏍᏓᏩᏗᏒᎢ ᎠᏂᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᎠᎩᎦᎵᏍᏓᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎣᏏᏃ ᎠᎩᏰᎸᏒᎢ ᏥᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᏯᏆᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ. ᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏊᏔᏅᎢ.”

Young Z ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. “ᎾᏊᏃ ᏚᏭᏔᏁᎢ ᎤᏍᏓᏩᏗᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ. ᎣᏍᏓᏃ ᎠᎩᏰᎸᏒᎢ ᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏰᎸᎢ ᎤᏍᏗᏓᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ physiology ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, ᏓᎩᎸᏉᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏧᎳ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏓ ᎠᏆᏟᎠᎶᏝ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Young.

Carlson Ꮓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ ᎨᏰᎸᎢ ᎠᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏢᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏎ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎤᎵᏏᎾᎯᏍᏙᏗ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎥᎿ IHS ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏓᏍᏆᏛᎢ.

“ᎾᏊᏃ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎦᎴᎼ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ ᏓᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎭ ᎯᎠ ᎪᎩ ᏥᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ Dr. (Krystina) Beaman, ᏥᏍᏓᏩᏗᏙᎭ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏧᎾᏔᎾ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᎳ ᏗᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎥᏝ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᎥᏍᎩᏳᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏖᏢᎢ ᏱᎩ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏥᎪᏩᏘᏍᎬᎢ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ ᎢᎦᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏳᏓᎳ ᏧᎸᎳᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ ᎦᎴᎼ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ W.W. Hastings ᏧᏂᏢᎩ ᎥᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᏥᎪᏢᎭ.

Evans ᎠᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ Dr. Nolan ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᏧᏪᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᏝᏙᏳᎢ ᏧᏭᎪᏔᏅᎢ ᏱᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏧᎪᎶᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏙᏫᏢᎢ, ᏧᎾᏓᏰᎳᏍᏗᎢ, cardio, ᏧᎾᏔᏅ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᎳ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Young Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏳᏚᎳ ᎤᎵᏍᏕᎸᏗᎢ ᎤᎵᎩᏐᏗᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎥᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᏧᏂᏢᎩᎢ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᏝᏙᏳᎢ ᏧᏭᎪᏔᏅᎢ ᏱᎩ. ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᎬᏩᏅᏑᏰᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏅᏬᏘ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ OSU ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ Hastings ᏧᏂᏢᎩᎢ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗ. ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏯᎾᏑᏰᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏩᏗᏙᎲᎢ ᎠᏂᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏯᎢ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ ᏓᏂᏩᏛᎯᏙᎲᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏧᏂᏢᎩᎢ ᎾᏊᏃ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᏍᏆᏛᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ OSU ᏧᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏧᏂᏢᎩᎢ ᏥᏗᎪᏢᎭ ᎠᏓᎣᎴᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎪᏢᏎᏍᏗ ᎥᎿ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᎦᏙᎢ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎢ, ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᎠᏁᎳ, ᎠᎭᏂ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏕᏍᏗ state-of-the-art ᏗᎧᏅᏑᎵ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᏗᎪᏏᏐᏗᎢ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸᎢ ᎠᎴ cutting-edge technologies, ᎠᎴ ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏕᏍᏗ medical simulations.

ᏂᎦᏓᏃ ᏦᎢ ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᎪᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎥᎿ 469,000-ᏅᎩ ᏧᏅᏏᏯ ᏱᎳᏏᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏍᏚᎡᏍᏗ ᎥᎿ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ ᏧᏙᏢᎭ ᎤᏟᏗᏢᎢ, ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎥᎿ ᎾᏊ ᏥᎪᏢᎭ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ. ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏕᏟᏙᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏧᏂᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᏴᏫ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏂᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᏱᏄᎾᎵᏍᏔᏂ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏁᏉᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

Carlson, ᏍᏏᏉᏯ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ, ᎤᏪᎵᏗᏙᎸᎢ ᎥᎿ “ᎠᎾᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ” ᏔᎵ ᏗᎦᏩᏘ ᏗᎾᎩᎸᏗᏍᎩ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ 2017 ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎡᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

Evans Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ, ᎤᏅᏔ ᎦᎪ ᏧᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᎨᏒ ᏕᎨᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ ᏙᏏ ᎧᎻᏏᏂ ᏧᏎᏢᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏔᎵ ᏳᎵᏏ, ᎠᏍᎦᎢᎲᎢ ᏕᎨᎫᎪᏗᏍᎬᎢ, ᏕᎧᏃᎯᏎᎲᎢ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ Italian ᏧᏴᏫ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᎤᎵᏏᎩ ᏗᎧᏃᏗᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏚᏂᏅᏕᎢ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎭ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᏅᎲᎢ.

“ᏥᏕᏥᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎢ, ᏬᏂᏴᏃ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎬᏁᎯᏴᎢ ᎠᎹᏰᎵ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᏓᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏁᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᏋᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Evans Z ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᏓᎴᏁᎢ ᎥᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎾᎿᎢ ᎬᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏰᎵ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎥᎿ OSU COM.

Young Z ᏓᎵᏆ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎵᏍᏕᎸᎭ ᎥᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ-ᏚᏂᏍᏕᎸᎭ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎲᎢ “Camp Cherokee” ᎥᎾᏃ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎡᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᏧᏂᎶᏒᎢ. ᎾᏊᏃ ᎤᏁᏓᏴᏒᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ ᏚᏕᎶᏆᎡᎢ ᏗᎧᏃᎩᏍᏗ ᏥᏚᏲᏎᎢ, Carlson Ꮓ ᎤᏃᎮᏞᎢ ᏂᎬᎯᎵ ᎠᏂᏃᎯᏎᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏳᎪᏛᎢ ᎤᏑᏰᏒᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏯᏙᎯᏳᎯᏯᎢ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏚᏳᏛᎢ ᎦᏅᏅᎢ ᎠᏆᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ. ᎥᏝᏃ ᏙᏳᎢ ᎬᏍᎦᏍᏗ ᏱᎨᏎᎢ. ᎠᏏ ᏕᏥᏃᎩᏍᏗᎰᎢ (ᎥᎿ TU), ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏕᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏆᏤᎵᎢ bachelor’s ᎣᎩ ᎠᏛᏔᏍ ᎠᎩᏁᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏤᎵᎢ pre-med ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏤᏟᏓ ᎢᏧᏟᎶᏓ chemistry ᏪᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏰᎵᎢ ᎢᎬᏛᏁᏗ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏓᏭᎪᏛᏅᎢ ᎢᏯᏆᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎦᏅᏅᎢ ᎠᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎵᎦᎵᏴᏓ ᎢᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᏃ ᏛᏍᏓᏩᏗᏙᎲᎢ ᎠᏂᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᎠᎴ ᏥᎪᏩᏘᏍᎬᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴᎾᏍᏊ ᏧᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᎬᏩᎫᏍᏓᎥᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎬᎯᎵᏒᎢ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎠᏍᏓᏱᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏭᎪᏛᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᏅᏬᏘ.
Evans Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᏂᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏦᎢ ᏯᏥᏰᏝᎸᎢ ᎠᏏᏉ 17 ᏄᏕᏘᏱᏍᎬᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ ᎤᏩᎧᎲᎢ “ᏙᏳᎢ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᏭ ᏂᎬᏁᎲᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ” ᎠᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ “ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎦᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ.”

Young Z ᎤᏥᎢ ᎤᎿᏫᎢ ᎤᏓᏂᎵ ᎨᏒᎢ 5 ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏥᎢ ᎤᏅᏖᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎪᏟᎨᎢ ᎤᏥᎢ ᎤᏩᎧᎲᎢ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ “ᎢᎦᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎦᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ.”

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎵᏙᎸᎢ ᎡᎲᎢ, ᏯᏆᏚᎳ ᎩᎶᎢ (ᎡᎲᎢ),” ᏥᏍᏕᎸᎯᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

– TRANSLATED BY DAVID CRAWLER

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He e ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He e ...

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