Eating healthy on a budget

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/12/2017 08:00 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Denise Goss, clinical dietitian and dietician advisor at the Three Rivers Health Center, holds an advertisement for Reasor’s Grocery while at the store in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Goss said when grocery shopping it’s best to look at the ads for sale items to save money. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
A box of Ronzoni pasta sits on a shelf at Reasor’s Grocery in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, with a sales tag of 99 cents. Denise Goss, clinical dietitian and dietician advisor at the Three Rivers Health Center, said looking for sales items such as this pasta can help individuals save money when grocery shopping. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Denise Goss, clinical dietitian and dietician advisor at the Three Rivers Health Center, looks at a bag of Pictsweet Farms Steam’ables Broccoli Florets at Reasor’s Grocery in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Goss said if consumers couldn’t find certain fruits or vegetables in season it’s fine to purchase them either frozen or canned. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
On the vine cluster tomatoes are advertised at 99 cents at Reasor’s Grocery in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Denise Goss, clinical dietitian and dietician advisor at the Three Rivers Health Center, said typically in-season fruits and vegetables are less expensive. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – Eating healthy on a tight budget is a possibility for families if they make minor changes in the way they shop, plan and cook meals.

Many people believe they can’t eat healthy on a budget, but that’s not true, Denise Goss, clinical dietitian and dietician advisor at the Three Rivers Health Center, said.

“One of the big things is for people to plan ahead,” she said. “Don’t go into the grocery store without making a grocery list first and planning out the meals for the week.”

She said people tend to make “impulse buys” when they don’t make grocery lists and stick to them.

“They’ll spend more on food than they actually need,” Goss said. “A lot of times they’ll buy extra things like pop, chips and cookies. Those types of things aren’t nutritious but do cost a lot and add up on that grocery bill.”

Shopping for generic brands of commonly used groceries is another way to save money.

“They’re going to be less expensive and have just as much as far as quality goes as brand names,” she said.

Purchasing fruits and vegetables – the staples of a healthy diet and meal – in season will save money, too.

“If you can’t get them in season, do the canned or frozen,” Goss said.

If vegetables must be bought canned, she advised rinsing them in water before cooking to get rid of the extra sodium from the canning process. Canned fruits should also be rinsed to rid the syrups and sugars.

In the summer, people can shop at local farmers markets to buy locally grown produce, which is fresher than store produce.

“When you can, buy locally,” she said. “Farmers markets are great. They are a great resource for people because usually they’re going to be fresher and they don’t have to worry about what’s on them, like pesticides.”

Or better yet, growing a garden to get those fruits and vegetables is another option, Goss said.

Another money-saving tip is to clip coupons from the newspaper.

“Look at the sales ads in the newspaper and plan your menus around those sale items,” she said. “Clip coupons for items they’d normally purchase, and don’t clip the ones on items they don’t usually buy.”

Making meals from scratch is cheaper and healthier than making boxed meals, she said. Some meals to make from scratch include beans, stew or chili, which can be prepared in large quantities then reheated later for another dinner or lunches. These meals also allow for beans as meat substitutes, which is cheaper.

“Try using beans in recipes for a protein source instead of meat,” she said. “(Use) half and half – half beans and meat – for chili or tacos to save a little bit of money, too.”

Shoppers can also buy their items in bulk sizes, which allows a larger quantity of product for a cheaper price than buying several small quantities, she said. Some of those include pasta, dried beans, generic bagged cereals and meat, which can be frozen in smaller portions for future meals.

Also, allowing the children to help plan the menu, shop and prepare meals will get them excited about eating healthier, Goss said.

“Have a family fun night where they pick out a healthy recipe they want to have one night, and let them help,” she said. “Let them be a part of it when you’re planning your menu for the week, and ask them what they want for the week. Have a list of meals for the week. Kids like that.”

Plan ahead: Plan a menu at the beginning of each week. Then make a grocery list before shopping. Planning ahead helps save money so you’re not wandering around the grocery store randomly throwing items into the cart.

Don’t impulse buy: Stick to the list. Don’t shop while you’re hungry and don’t throw in soda, chips and cookies as you’re waiting in the checkout line.

Look for generic brands: Generic store brands are considerably cheaper than name brand grocery items yet have the same quality. The savings begin to add up when you buy generic brands each shopping trip.

Buy fruits and vegetables in-season: In-season fruits and vegetables are less expensive. Also, shop local farmers market to get fresh produce at cheaper prices.

Clip coupons: Clipping coupons may sound tedious, but the money saved is worth it. But only clip and use coupons on items you normally buy.

Buy in bulk: Purchasing meats, cereal, flour and other items in bulk can save money, and you won’t have to shop for those items as often. If you buy meats in bulk sizes, freeze them in sizes you can defrost and use later.

Sneak in some fruits and vegetables: It’s possible to sneak in fruits and vegetables during the day, even while sitting at work. Pack an apple or banana with your lunch or pack raw carrots or broccoli in small portions. Vegetables can even be dipped in low-fat dressing for added taste.

Let the kids help: Let the kids help plan the menu. If they’ve helped decide what meals they want, they’ll be more likely to eat it. Let the older children help prepare meals by cutting vegetables and other tasks, and let the younger kids help set the table.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎫᏐᎢ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ.- ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎣᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ ᏂᏛᎬᏁᎲᎢ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᏱᎦᏳᎾᏛᏁᏗ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ
ᎢᏳᏃ ᏍᏗᎩᏓ ᏳᏂᏁᏟᏴᏌ ᎾᏅᏛᏁᎲᎢ ᎠᎾᏓᎿᏁᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏢᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏳᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᏂ.

ᎤᏂᏣᏘ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏃᎯᏳᏐᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ ᏂᏓᏅᏁᎲᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎥᏝ ᎰᏩ ᏱᎩ, Denise Goss, ᎦᎾᎦᏙᎢ ᎠᏓᏃᎯᏎᎯ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᏚᏳᎪᏛᎢ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗᎢ ᎥᎿ Three Rivers Health Center, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

“ᏌᏉᏃ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏳᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᏏᏴᏫ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᎤᏓᏅᏖᎯᎶᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎨᏍᏗᏃ ᏩᏴᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᏅᎪᏪᎵᏍᎬᎾ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏁᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎯᎶᏍᏗ ᏂᏛᎵᏍᏓᏴᏂᏒᎢ ᏑᎾᏙᏓᏩᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᎠᎵᏒᎢ.”

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᎦᏓ ᏴᏫ “ᎾᏓᏅᏖᏢᎾ ᎤᏂᏩᏒᏍᎪᎢ” ᏄᏃᏪᎳᏅᏂ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏓᎾᏁᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ Ꮓ ᏂᏓᏂᏍᏓᏩᏕᎬᎾ.

“ᎤᎪᏓ ᏚᎾᎵᎬᏩᎳᏁᎰᎢ ᎤᏂᏩᏒᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏂᏂᎬᎾᏊ ᏱᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Goss. “ᏭᎪᏛᏃ ᏗᏗᏔᏍᏗ ᏓᏂᏁᎩᏍᎪᎢ, ᏄᎾ ᎤᏍᏓᎦᏴᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏚ ᎤᏂᎦᎾᏍᏗ. ᎯᎠᏃ ᎢᏭᏍᏗ ᎥᏝ ᏱᏚᏳᎪᏓ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᏎᏃ ᏍᏈᏍᏗᏭ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎧᏅᏉᎪᎩ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎣᏩᏍᎬᎢ.”

ᎥᏓᎾᏁᏍᎬᏃ ᎦᏲᏟ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᏴᎵᏏᏅᏛᏓ ᎠᏕᎳ.

“ᎠᎦᏲᏞᏍᏗ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏠᏱᏊ ᎢᏲᏍᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎪᏗ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᏲᏩᏍᎦ ᎤᏓᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ - ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏤᏝ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎬᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ - ᎠᎴ ᏓᏓᏁᏟᏴᏎᎬᎢ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏴᎵᏏᏅᏓ, ᎾᏍᏊ.

“ᎢᏳᏃ ᎬᏣᏩᏛᏗ ᏱᎩ ᎾᎯᏳ ᏓᏓᏁᏟᏴᏎᎬᎢ, ᎦᎵᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎯᎩᏍᎨᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎦᏁᏍᏓᎳᏗᏍᏔᏅᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Goss.

ᎢᏳᏃ ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᎦᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᏎᎢ ᎠᏩᎯᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᎹᎭ ᏗᏟᏰᏗ ᎥᎦᏲᎶᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎻ ᎤᎵᏥᏛᎢ ᎠᏏᏉ ᏅᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏅᏑᏴᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏂᏟᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏓᏔᏅᎢ ᎦᏟᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎠᎹᎭ ᏱᏛᎫᎯᎶᏣ ᎥᎦᏲᎶᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎦᎾᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎧᎵᏎᏥ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎥᎢ.

ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᎪᎩ, ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭᏃ ᎡᏍᎦᏂᏃ ᏗᏂᎶᎩᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏅᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᏱᏓᏂᏩᎯᏏ ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ, ᏓᏤᏝᏃ ᎠᏏᏅ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ ᏲᏩᏍᎦ ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ.

“ᏴᎦᏟᏛᏅᏍᎦᏃ, ᎡᏍᎦᏂᏊ ᎠᏩᎯᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏗᏂᎶᎩᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏅᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏓᏤᏝ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏤᏝ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫ ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎩᎳᏊ ᎠᏕᏓ ᎨᏐᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎥᏝᏃ ᎤᏁᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᏱᎦᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏕᎦᏅᎵᏰᎥᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏳᏍᏗ ᏍᎪᏱ ᏗᎯᏍᏙᏗ,”

ᎠᎴᏱᎩ, ᏴᏫᏒᎠᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᎩᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᎢ ᏱᎬᏛᏁᏗ. ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Goss. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏱᎬᏛᏁᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ-ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏗᎦᎴᏱᏔᏅᎢ ᏕᎪᏪᎸᎢ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᎦᏲᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏩᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏕᎪᏪᎸᎢ ᏗᎪᏣᎴᏍᏗ.

“ᏗᎪᎵᏰᏗ ᎦᏲᏟ ᏚᏂᎬᏩᎶᏛ ᎥᎿ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎦᎴᏱᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗᏃ ᏣᏤᎵᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏔᏓᏍᏓᏴᏂᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏣᎿᎥᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᏍᏓᏥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏗᎭ ᏚᏯᎢ, ᎠᏫᏒᏅᎢ ᎤᎦᎹ ᎠᎴ ᏥᎵ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᎤᎪᏗᏓ ᏴᎦᎥᎦ ᎾᏊᏃ ᎠᏟᎠᎵᏒᏃ ᏴᏙᏓ ᎤᏒᎯᏰᏱ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎢᎦ ᎡᎯ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ. ᎯᎠᏃ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᏚᏯ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎭᏫᏯᎢ ᎤᏠᏱᏊ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᎭ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎦᏲᏝ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏓ.
“ᎭᏁᏟᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᏚᏯ ᎥᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎠᏏᏅ ᎭᏫᏯᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “(ᎬᏙᏗ) ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏰᏟ-ᎠᏰᏟ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏚᏯᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎭᏫᏯ - ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎵ ᏴᎪᏢᏍᎦ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏔᎪᏏ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ, ᎾᏍᏊ.”

ᎠᎾᏓᎾᏁᏍᎩᏃ ᏱᏂᏩᎭ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏕᎦᎸᏛᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᎰᎢ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎦᏟᏗᏓᏅᎢ ᏯᎦᏲᏟᏃ ᏱᏚᎬᎶᏗ ᎠᏏᏅ ᏲᏩᏍᎦ ᎯᎸᏍᎩ ᏧᏍᏗ ᏕᎦᎸᏛᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎦᎸᏅᎢ ᎢᏧᏍᏗ, ᎤᏂᎧᏲᏓ ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎦᏲᏟ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎤᎧᏲᏓ ᏑᎾᎴᎢ ᎡᎯ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎭᏫᏯ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᏃ ᎠᎦᏲᏟ ᏱᏗᎬᏁᎸᎢ ᏱᏛᎦᏁᏍᏓᎳᏗᏍᏗ ᎤᏩᎬᏗᏗᏒᎢ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ. ᎠᎴᎾᏍᎩᏊ, ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᎰᎢ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᎯᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏢᏅᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎬᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᏓᎾᏁᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏙ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏳᏂᎦᎵᏍᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏚᏳᎪᏛᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

“ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎬᏩᏂᏰᎸᏗ ᏓᏤᏢᎢ ᎬᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎤᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎵᏍᎪᏟᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎤᎾᎵᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏢᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎠᏟᎠᎵᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᏛᏛᏗ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᎲᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎠᏟᎠᎵᏒᎢ. ᏗᏂᏲᏟᏃ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏙᎢ.”

– Translated by David Crawler

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/20/2018 11:20 AM
The Great 100 Nurses Foundation honors nurses from Ok...

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/14/2018 08:30 AM
Hospital benefit coordinators will assist Na...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
09/13/2018 10:06 AM
Saint Francis and Oklahoma State University Medical Center ...

BY CHRISTINA GOOD VOICE
Special Correspondent
09/10/2018 02:17 PM
The possession of marijuana – medical or recreational ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/07/2018 04:57 PM
Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will be at the...

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
08/30/2018 08:35 AM
Wings Fitness members have the opp...