Brandon Doyle strives to be full-time actor

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
02/04/2020 08:30 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Brandon Doyle
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Brandon Doyle plays a role in the film “American Patriot.” COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Brandon Doyle as Thomas Putnam in a production of “The Crucible” at Oklahoma City University. COURTESY
STUDIO CITY, Calif. – Growing up on a dairy farm in a small Oklahoma town that praised sports, Cherokee Nation citizen Brandon Doyle knew he would rather be an entertainer. So less than a year ago, he hit the road and headed west to where movie stars are made.

While living in Stilwell, Oklahoma, Doyle said he was involved in theater classes, high school plays and showing cattle at livestock shows.

He was a member of the Cherokee National Youth Choir for seven years and said his time in the choir is what molded him into the performer he is today.

“I grew up in a small, rural town where football was the thing. But the CNYC exposed me to arts and culture that I wouldn’t have gotten at school,” Doyle said. “The CNYC taught me how to be a professional. It motivated me to build a strong rehearsal and work ethic when it came to my craft. It also taught me the importance of being on time because in the entertainment industry, being five minutes early is on time, arriving on time is being late and arriving late is unacceptable.”

After graduating Stilwell High School in 2014, Doyle studied acting at Oklahoma City University School of Theatre and graduated in 2018.

While at OCU, he was bitten by the acting bug when he worked as a background extra on a feature film.

“I originally wanted to work in the entertainment industry as a singer, so being in the CNYC was the perfect outlet for that,” he said. “It wasn’t until I worked as a background extra on a feature film that was shooting in Oklahoma City when I wanted to specifically go into acting. I saw the lead actors working and doing their thing in front of the camera and thought ‘I want to do that.’ Ever since, I’ve done everything I can to make that dream a reality,” he said.

One of his first professional acting gigs was when he lived in Oklahoma City and was cast in a film about a Vietnam veteran and was “on location” in Texas.

“It was the first time I felt like a real working actor,” Doyle said. “I was ‘on location’ in a different city to shoot a film that I was being paid to act in, and they got me a hotel room. I felt like Meryl Streep. It was a small film with a low budget, but I felt like I was a part of something bigger than myself, and I had the opportunity to help tell a story about someone strong and inspiring, and I’ll forever be grateful for that job.”

Since delving into acting, Doyle has several projects under his belt. He moved to California in 2019 to gain more experience. For example, he’s had a recurring role on TV’s “Murder Made Me Famous” and has been cast in theater productions such as “Titus Andronicus.”

Being a CN citizen in the entertainment industry, Doyle said it’s an “exciting time.”

“Most recently, the Casting Society of America held open casting calls in multiple cities throughout the country like LA, Chicago, New York City and many more to try to specifically find more Indigenous actors,” he said.

He added that regional theater companies around the country are producing plays and musicals based on and written by Native Americans and that Cherokee actor Wes Studi winning an honorary Academy Award inspires him.

Doyle said he can think of doing nothing but acting for the rest of his life.

“When I was younger, I wanted to be rich and famous so I think that always motivated me,” he said. “However, now, I’ve studied my craft and have started to build my career and I can’t imagine doing anything else. I don’t really care about the fame or money anymore. I just want to simply wake up in the morning and be a full-time working actor. I was to eat, breathe and sleep acting.”

For more information visit brandondoyle.org.
About the Author
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated magna cum laude from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing ...
lindsey-bark@cherokee.org • 918-772-4223
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated magna cum laude from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing ...

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