Notchietown Hardwoods showcases wood creations

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
09/27/2017 08:00 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox, owner of Notchietown Hardwoods, works on a hand-turned ink pen in his shop near Gore, Oklahoma. Through woodworking, Cox creates products and sells them locally. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHEONIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
A piece of dyed box elder wood is clamped to a lathe and shaped into a pen by Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox. Cox owns Notchietown Hardwoods, where he sells handmade woodwork products. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox, owner of Notchietown Hardwoods, pieces a box elder wooden ink pen together in his shop near Gore, Oklahoma. Cox does general woodworking and makes anything from handmade bowls, rolling pins, cutting boards, seam rippers and specialty items. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Displayed is a raw and finished box elder wooden ink pen handmade by Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox, owner of Notchietown Hardwoods. He says his pens are his best sellers. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
For the Cherokee Phoenix’s fourth quarter giveaway, Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox donated a handmade decorative sign, bowl and two ink pens. Each quarter the Cherokee Phoenix gives away donated items from artists or businesses to people who donate to its Elder/Veteran Fund or purchases a subscription or merchandise. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
GORE, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Jay Cox turned a hobby into a successful business. That business is Notchietown Hardwoods, where he creates products through woodworking and sells them.

Cox makes anything from handmade bowls, rolling pins, cutting boards, seam rippers and specialty items. He takes custom orders, too, but his most popular product is a hand-turned ink pen. Most of his products are made from locally sourced wood.

“I’ve always loved woodworking. I did it with my grandpa, and I’ve had a passion for it. It’s just kind of rekindled in that last couple of years,” Cox said.

After quitting a job he was not happy with, Cox decided to do something he loves.

“It’s turned out to be a real blessing working for yourself and having the freedom to choose which direction you go. It’s been really satisfying,” he said.

Cox’s products are made mostly from walnut, maple, cherry, cedar and sycamore trees grown in Oklahoma.

“Oklahoma has so many different trees. So many different varieties of wood, but maple, walnut and cedar are some of the big ones that we use that we get pretty regularly,” Cox said. “I try to use as much wood locally as I can. There are some things in Oklahoma that we don’t have, that we have to get from other places. But we have wood from all over the world. Generally we try to keep the majority of the stuff we use local.”

Being Cherokee, Cox said it’s a part of the culture to use what is available.

“That’s part of the Cherokee culture, is using what is available to you. It’s kind of satisfying really because thousands of years ago there was someone doing this, maybe not exactly like I am, but they were using the same kinds of materials and the same basic principles to make something useful out of nothing,” he said.

When Cox creates an ink pen, he choose the wood, cuts it into the necessary dimensions, dyes the wood to affect the color of the pen, clamps the piece of wood to a machine called a lathe and begins shaping it. Once shaped, the piece is sanded down and coated with super glue. Then, the metal hardware is installed onto the wood and the ink pen is completed.

“It seems like everyone is pretty well happy with everything. I don’t know that I’ve had many complaints at all. But I try to stand behind everything I make. If something’s wrong with it, I’ll gladly fix it. People love the stuff we make and that’s why we keep making it.”

Cox is an advocate for small local businesses and said he works with other business to sell his products or just to have “general community involvement.

“We try to keep things local as much as possible. We try to shop local. We try to do business with people in our community,” he said.

For more information visit www.notchietownhardwoods.com or Notchietown Hardwoods on Facebook or @notchietown_hardwoods on Instagram.

Cox is the Cherokee Phoenix’s fourth quarter giveaway artist. He donated two handmade ink pens, a bowl and a decorative sign. The drawing for that giveaway is Jan. 2.

To enter for the giveaway, one must donate to the Cherokee Phoenix’s Elder/Veteran Subscription Fund or purchase a newspaper subscription or merchandise. One entry is given for every $10 spent.

For more giveaway information, call Danny Eastham at 918-453-5743 or Justin Smith at 918-207-4975 or email danny-eastham@cherokee.org or justin-smith@cherokee.org.
About the Author
lindsey-bark@cherokee.org • 918-772-4223
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to ...

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