Cherokee language program created for immersion school grads

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
01/23/2018 08:00 AM
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program participants learn the language in their new classroom setting on the second story of the Cort Mall on Jan. 10 in Tahlequah. Graduates of CLMAP are expected to become instructors in the new 14th Generation Master Apprentice program. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Chris Holmes, a Sequoyah High School Cherokee language teacher, helps three students at the in January at the Tahlequah-based school. The Cherokee Nation has created a language program with select Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program participants teaching Cherokee Immersion Charter School graduates as they enter Sequoyah High School. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Sequoyah High School students study the Cherokee language during class on Jan. 18 in Tahlequah. Cherokee Immersion Charter School graduates who attend SHS can now continue learning the language from Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program participants thanks to a new pilot project called the 14th Generation Master Apprentice Program. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Businesses signed a memorandum of understanding on Jan. 10 to begin a Cherokee language pilot project called the 14th Generation Master Apprentice Program.

The program aims to have select Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program participants teach the language to Cherokee Immersion Charter School graduates as they enter Sequoyah High School.

“We hope to make an opportunity for them to polish up their language skills and at the same time pass on the teaching techniques that we’ve developed in the adult master-apprentice program for the high school so they can be teachers one day or at least teach their family and friends,” Ryan Mackey, CLMAP curriculum supervisor, said.

The MOU states the “Cherokee Nation and CNB share a common interest in promoting and encouraging the continuous use of the Cherokee language. This requires trained and educated individuals who are prepared to further the proper use of the Cherokee language through instruction of others.”

The program is geared toward immersion school graduates attending SHS to continue learning the language in an after-school program and a 10-week summer intensive learning program.
CLMAP graduates will be selected and employed as instructors in the pilot project.

CNB is funding the program with $180,000 going toward salaries, materials and tools necessary to aid CLMAP instructors in conducting their teachings. Included in the funding is classroom space, meals for participating students, travel for natural language environment field trips, staff training, administrative costs and indirect costs where applicable.

“It’s a great day in the Cherokee Nation that we get the opportunity to take our language program to another level,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said.

CLMAP first-year participant and CN citizen Jeromy Miller said he is participating in CLMAP to help his children, who attend the immersion school, continue learning Cherokee at home and bridge the language gap.

“I didn’t have the language myself. I wasn’t able to teach my kids growing up how to speak in their tribal language, their own Cherokee language,” Miller said. “Now that I am learning the language I can bring that home as well, and I can complete the circle in my house of communicating in our tribal tongue.”

The CLMAP began in 2015 to create Cherokee speakers and teachers from adult second-language learners. The program promotes the revitalization of the Cherokee language with participants spending 40 hours a week immersed in the language to become proficient speakers.

The program recently received new office and classroom space on the second floor of the Cort Mall above the Kawi Café in Tahlequah. The space is needed for the program’s expansion.

“It gives us enough space to have breakout classrooms as well as a main classroom. It also provides office space for our staff members, and that’s not something that we’ve had. We started as a very small program and so we needed a small space. But at this point we’ve expanded and we’ve been very successful and we want to make sure that people are accommodated,” Mackey said.

For more information about the 14th Generation Master Apprentice Program, call 918-207-4950.
About the Author
lindsey-bark@cherokee.org • 918-772-4223
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to ...

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