2 Cherokee Nation citizens running for U.S. House

BY D. SEAN ROWLEY
Senior Reporter
09/28/2020 08:30 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Markwayne Mullin is the incumbent for Oklahoma’s Second Congressional District. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Yvette Harrell is running for New Mexico’s Second Congressional District seat for the second time. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – Currently, there are four American Indians in the U.S. Congress, all in the House of Representatives: Tom Cole and Cherokee Nation citizen Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma – both Republicans – and Democrats Sharice Davids of Kansas and Deb Haaland of New Mexico.

The number may seem small, and America’s Indigenous population remains underrepresented in Washington, D.C., but it also ties for the most Natives ever to concurrently serve in Congress.

With the federal election weeks away, two CN citizens are campaigning for seats in the House. Mullin seeks a fifth term serving Oklahoma’s Second District, and is challenged by Democrat Danyell Lanier and Libertarian Richard Castaldo. Yvette Herrell is the GOP challenger for New Mexico’s Second District, running against Democrat incumbent Xochiti Torres Small.

Mullin says he enjoys and is committed to public service.

“Every morning when I wake up and do my devotional, I say ‘love the people, love the call,’” he said. “I truly mean that. It’s an honor to serve the great state of Oklahoma.”

Since the 2016 election of Donald Trump, Mullin has been a vocal supporter of the administration. He says he supports Trump’s agenda to “defeat the socialists, defend our cherished values and protect the sanctity of life.” His current public office, which he has held since 2013, was his first.

“I first ran for office after never having been involved in politics because I saw firsthand how government regulations were crushing businesses like mine and I knew I couldn’t stand by and watch that happen,” he said. “I came to Congress to fight against the job-killing overregulation, and against reckless deficit spending so my grandchildren aren’t saddled with our debt. We have made progress but the fight isn’t over.”

Mullin said people make decisions based on their upbringing and experiences through life, and that Cherokee culture has impacted both for him.

“I was born and raised in Indian Country so that influences every decision I make,” he said. “I grew up only going to (W.W) Hastings Hospital, so all I knew was Indian Health Services. IHS is greatly underfunded and it needs to be funded at adequate levels. It is a federal obligation.”

Herrell is running for her district’s seat for a second time after serving Dist. 51 in the New Mexico House of Representatives from 2011-18. Her 2018 loss to Small was narrow – by less than 4,000 votes with nearly 200,000 cast. She also supports Trump’s presidency.

“I am running for Congress to be a voice for the people of New Mexico’s Second District and faithfully represent our shared values,” Herrell said. “Too many politicians forget about the people they serve when they get to Washington, but my focus will always be doing what’s best for them and our district.”

Like Mullin, Herrell says her Native heritage has been influential on her outlook and decisions.

“It's always been a part of me, and has given me respect and appreciation for the vast diversity we have as Americans,” she said.

The only other time there were four congressional Natives was 1923-25 when Sens. Charles Curtis and Robert Owen, and representatives Charles Carter and William Hastings, served in the 68th Congress. Owen, Carter and Hastings represented Oklahoma.

Hastings was an educator and Tahlequah lawyer who served as attorney general for the CN from 1891-95. His efforts helped secure an IHS hospital in Tahlequah named after him in 1935.

Owen was also a CN citizen and one of Oklahoma’s first two senators.

Also remembered as Herbert Hoover’s vice president, Curtis gets author’s credit for the Curtis Act of 1898, though he claimed dissatisfaction with the multiple committee revisions. The act dissolved the governments and courts of the Five Civilized Tribes, allotted tribal lands, and helped clear-cut the path for Oklahoma’s admission as a state.
About the Author
Sean Rowley was hired by the Cherokee Phoenix at the beginning of 2019. Sean was born a long time ago in Tulsa, where he grew up and attended Booker T. Washington High School as a freshman before moving to Pawnee County and graduating from Cleveland High School in 1987. 

He graduated sans honors from Northeastern State University in 1992 with a bachelor of arts in mass communication with emphases in advertising and public relati ...
david-rowley@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Sean Rowley was hired by the Cherokee Phoenix at the beginning of 2019. Sean was born a long time ago in Tulsa, where he grew up and attended Booker T. Washington High School as a freshman before moving to Pawnee County and graduating from Cleveland High School in 1987. He graduated sans honors from Northeastern State University in 1992 with a bachelor of arts in mass communication with emphases in advertising and public relati ...

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/20/2020 10:41 AM
Initial spending on both casinos is proj...

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/19/2020 04:30 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma State Department of Health’s data on its website showed...

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
10/19/2020 02:32 PM
“Rock the Native Vote 2020” con...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/19/2020 08:20 AM
(AP) – The number of hospitalizations due to the coronavirus dipped on Sunday but still remained high as the number of reported cases increased by 796 and deaths rose by 3, according to the Oklahoma State Department of Health.
There were a reported 715 people hospitalized, the department sa...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/16/2020 05:21 PM
Some governors are even pushing back against...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/16/2020 05:19 PM
NEW YORK (AP) — Pfizer Inc. cannot request emergency authorization ...