Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair set for Jan. 23

BY CHRISTINA GOOD VOICE
Special Correspondent
12/23/2009 07:05 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Young science, mathematics and engineering-oriented students will be exhibiting months of research, experiments and conclusions on Jan. 23 at the fourth annual Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair.

The deadline for the science and engineering fair has been extended to Jan. 15, which is just a little more than a week before the event.

The fair is still separated into two divisions, which are grades 5–8 and 9-12. The fair will take place at Northeastern State University’s Herb Rozzell Ballroom.

“It’s open to anybody in those ages who is Cherokee,” said Daniel Faddis, CN Education Outreach specialist.

The fair is an opportunity for Cherokee students to participate in a science-based learning environment and create science projects that can be shared with peers, educators and professionals, according to a cover letter sent to schools.

The fair also provides a forum for students to have their research recognized and critiqued in the disciplines of science, mathematics, engineering, technology and cultural preservation.

Student will also have the opportunity to win prizes and awards at the fair.

In December Faddis served as a judge at the Catoosa High School Science Fair, he also visited Grove High School where he was able walk through their lab and get a sneak preview of their projects.

“I admired how organized they were,” Faddis said. “It’s exciting.”

Some students didn’t have the lab equipment available to complete their projects, but they didn’t quit working on them. The students simply built the tools and equipment they needed to complete their projects, he said.

“For them to take that leadership and ambition and achieve a project shows outstanding caliber,” Faddis said. “It’s amazing to me that these students gave up social time to care enough about research and their project.”

At the Jan. 23 fair, judges will evaluate and focus on what the student did in the current year; how well a student followed the scientific, engineering, computer programming or mathematical methodologies; the detail and accuracy of research as documented in the data book; and whether experimental procedures were used in the best possible way.

Categories at the CNSEF include animal sciences, chemistry, computer science, biochemistry, environmental management, engineering, microbiology and medicine and health sciences among many other categories.

For more information, call Faddis at (918) 453-5224 or e-mail daniel-faddis@cherokee.org.
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