Fort Smith tour changes Cherokee Nation employees’ perceptions

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
05/10/2010 07:07 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nationemployees listen to Ashley Richards, a Fort Smith National Historic Site ParkRanger, talk about some of the hangings that took place at the gallows for thefederal court in Fort Smith, Ark., during the 1800s. (Photo by Will Chavez)
FORT SMITH, Ark. – Cherokee Nation employees filled a charter bus on April 30 in Tahlequah, Okla., and traveled to the Fort Smith National Historic Site to learn more about the site’s ties to Cherokee history.Fort Smith is mostly known for Judge Isaac Parker, who presided over the federal court there from 1875-96 and received a reputation of being a “hanging judge.”“I actually do defend Judge Parker. He gets a horrible reputation as being a hanging judge, but it was the law and he had no other choice but to carry it out,” said Ashley Richards, a Fort Smith National Historic Site Park Ranger, to CN employees at the fort’s gallows. “A lot of people don’t realize ‘the hanging judge’ was against the death penalty.”Richards said Parker advocated for alternatives to capital punishment, was a supporter of Native American rights and impartial when it came to justice. Contrary to some beliefs, she said records show Parker was even-handed in his sentences and did not sentence an inordinate number of Native people to death. While on the bench, Parker tried 13,490 cases, 344 of which were capital crimes. Of the 156 men and four women sentenced to death by Parker, 79 were actually hanged. The rest died in jail, appealed or were pardoned. Several famous lawmen also served as deputy marshals for the Parker court, including Cherokees Zeke Proctor and Sam Sixkiller. About 110 deputy marshals were killed in the line of duty during Parker’s time on the bench, including Sixkiller.Cynthia Cavin, a CN Asset Management clerk, said she enjoyed the tour because it allowed her to connect Fort Smith’s history with Cherokee history. “It filled in some blanks for me,” she said. “One interesting thing was learning more about Judge Parker and how he has been misrepresented. He really just enforced the death penalty, and I didn’t know he never saw a hanging himself.” Lydia Harjo McBroom, a parenting para-professional for Indian Child Welfare, said she thought the tour was “great” yet sad at times because she thought about her ancestors who traveled through Fort Smith. “It’s exciting to see where our ancestors were, but also it’s sad. It probably wasn’t exciting for them or enjoyable,” said McBroom, who is Muscogee Creek and Choctaw. During the removals of the 1830s, most of the Five Civilized Tribes stopped in Fort Smith for supplies before crossing the Arkansas River into Indian Territory. Catherine Foreman Gray, an interpretive supervisor for CN Cultural Tourism, said Cherokee history and Fort Smith history are “completely intertwined.” The fort was established to protect Old Settler Cherokees who moved to eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas voluntarily in the early 1800s from the Osage tribe that claimed much of eastern Oklahoma. “Fort Smith was established to try maintain peace in the area,” said Gray, who previously worked as a Fort Smith National Historic Site Park Ranger. The fort was abandoned in 1824, and Fort Gibson was established further up the Arkansas River, west of Tahlequah, to protect Cherokees from the Osage. Gray said a federal court continued to operate in Fort Smith and had jurisdiction over all of Indian Territory, including the CN.Gray also said Cherokee patriots Zeke Proctor and Ned Christie, who are profiled in the Fort Smith National Historic Site, fascinate her. Considered outlaws by some, she said both men, in their own way, challenged the court’s jurisdiction over Cherokee legal matters and believed only the CN had authority to hear their cases. “It’s a great example of the jurisdictional issues and the conflict that was going on between Indian Territory and this federal court,” she said. “Ned Christie is a great example of someone who really stood up against this court and really stood up against the federal government.”She said Proctor and Christie tried to force the federal government to keep its promise of letting the CN be a sovereign nation if it moved west. “Ned Christie is probably one of favorite characters in all of Cherokee history,” Gray said. “I really admire what he stood up for.” She added that her interest in outlaw history led her to research Fort Smith booking records when she worked there. She said eventually she found family names.“It is interesting how many of our ancestors, rightfully or wrongfully, for whatever reason they were here, some were just witnesses, how many names you run across,” she said. “It’s fascinating history.”
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏂᏚᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏚᎾᏓᏅᏛᎢ

ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ, ᎾᎾᎾ. -- ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᏂᎧᎵᎸ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏗᎦᏚᎴᏂ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᏬᏅ ᏦᏍᎪᎯᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ, ᎠᎴ ᎣᎦᏂᎩᏒ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏭᏂᎷᏨ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏅᏓᏗᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏤᎲ ᏗᎦᏛᏍᎩ ᏱᏍᎠᎠᏓ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ, ᎾᎿ ᏧᏬᏢ ᏩᏥᏂ ᏧᎾᏓᏰᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏂᏓᎬᏩᎴᏅᏓ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏐ ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏂᏛᎬᏩᎴᏅᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏐ ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎦᏅᏓᏗᏍᏙᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒᎢ "ᏗᏓᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ."

"ᏙᎯᏳᏃ ᏥᏯᎫᏍᏛᏁ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ. ᎢᎦᏃ Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏯᎦᏓᏅᏕ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᎧᎾᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏝᏃ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎢᎬᏩᏅᏗ ᏱᎨᏎᎢ ᎠᏎ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎢᏳᏛᏗᎢ," ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏌᏍᎯᎵᎡᏯ ᏏᎢᏓᎯᎠᏛᏗᏍ, Ꮎ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎾᎵᏏᏅᏔᏅ ᏓᏓᏁᎸ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᏗᏘᏂᏙᎯ, ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏧᎾᏓᏛᏗ ᏄᏪᏒᎢ. "ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ Ꮭ ᏳᎾᏅᏓ 'ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏓᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ' Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᏰᎸᎯ ᏱᎨᏎ ᏓᏂᎯᎲ ᎤᏂᏍᎦᏅᏨᎢ."

ᏏᎢᏓᎯᎠᏛᏗᏍ ᎤᏛᏅ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᎦᏂᎳᏗᏍᎩ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎢᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏩᎫᏍᏓᎢ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎤᏂᎲ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᏌᏆᎪᏛ ᏯᎵᎪᏁᎮᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏟᎵᎶᎦ. ᎢᎦᏓᏃ Ꮭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎾᏁᎵᏍᎪ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏄᏪᏒ ᏕᎪᏪᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ Ꮭ ᏌᏆᎫᏗ ᏳᎵᏕᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎫᎪᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏎ ᎤᎪᎵᏱᎢᏌᏘ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᏕᎫᎪᏓᏏ ᎠᏁᎯᏯᎢ ᏧᏂᏲᎱᎯᏍᏗᎢ.

ᏧᏬᏢᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏍᎩᎸ, ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᏚᏱᎵᏙᎸ ᏦᎦᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎢᏯᏂᎢ, ᏦᎢᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᏅᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏂᏍᎦᏅᏨ ᎨᏎ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎠᏂᏍᎦᏯ ᎠᎴ ᏅᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏚᎾᎵᏒᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᎠᏯᎥᎢ, ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎨᎦᏛᏁ. ᏭᏅᎪᏛᏃ ᏧᎾᏓᏍᏚᏗ ᏚᏂᏲᎱᏎ, ᎤᏂᏔᏲᏝ ᎠᎴ ᎨᏥᏙᎵᏤᎢ.

ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᏯᏂᎢ ᏧᎾᏓᏃᏣᏟ ᏗᎾᏓᏂᏱᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᎳᏗᏙᎴ ᎠᎴ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᎾᎴᎲᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏓᏂᏱᏍᎩ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ, ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᏃᎡᎸᎡ ᏓᎬᏙᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏌᎻ ᏑᏓᎳᏗᎯ.
ᎤᏛᎾ ᎠᏎ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏯᏂᎠ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᎾᎴᎲᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏓᏂᏱᏍᎩ ᏕᎨᏥᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᎿ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏧᏬᏢᎢ, ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏔᏁ ᏑᏓᎵᏗᎯ.

ᏟᏯᎾᏔᎯᎢᎠ ᏟᎠᎥᎢᎾ, Ꮎ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏄᏩᎾᏅ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᏗᎪᏪᎵᏍᎩ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏨ ᎤᏪᏅᏒ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏗᎬᏩᏓᏙᏗ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ.

"ᎤᎧᎵᏤ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎦᏓ ᏂᎪᎵᎬᎾ ᎨᏒᎢ," ᎤᏛᏁᎢ, "ᏌᏊ ᎢᏳᏓᎴ ᎢᎦ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏪᎠᏛᎸᎡᏛ ᎠᎴ ᏃᏊ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎡᏓᏓᏅᏛᎢ. ᏙᎯᏳᏃ ᏗᎧᎾᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᏂᎬᏅ ᏧᏂᏲᎱᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏛᏁᎲ, ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᏯᏆᏅᏕ ᎢᎴᎯᏳ ᎤᎪᎲ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎨᏒ ᏴᏫ ᏕᎨᎦᏛᏍᎬᎢ."

ᎮᏯᏗᎢᎠ ᎲᎠᏛᏚᎣ ᎷᏓᏰᏛᎣᎣᏅ, ᏧᎾᏓᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎦᏔᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᏳᏅᏁᎯ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ "ᎣᏍᏓ" ᎠᏎᏍᎩᏂ ᎤᎯᏐᏗ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏗᏓᏓᏛᏂ ᎤᏂᎶᏒ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᎤᎾᎴᏫᏍᏔᎾ.

"ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎩᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ ᎢᏕᏙ ᎠᏎᏍᎩᏂ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᎯᏐᏗ. Ꮭ ᎠᏎ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᏚᎾᏓᏅᏕ." ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎷᏓᏰᏛᎣᎣᏅ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎫᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏣᏓ.

ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᏥᎨᏥᏱᎳᏫᏛᎮ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏦᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᏂᎦᏓᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏘᏌᏅ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎤᎾᎴᏫᏍᏔᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ Ꮎ ᎤᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ Ꮟ ᏂᏚᏂᏐᏨᎾ ᎾᎿ ᎾᎾᎾᎾᎾᎾ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏭᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎨᏥᏁᎸ ᎦᏙᎯ.

ᏟᎠᏔᎯᎡᏛᎢᎾᎡ ᏈᎣᏛᎡᏅᎠᎾ ᏥᏛᎠᏯ, ᏗᏁᎸᏓᏁ ᏗᏎᎮᎵᏙ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸ ᏗᏓᏘᏂᏙ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎵᏙᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ "ᏓᎵᎪᎲᏍᎩ." ᎾᏃ ᎠᏐᏴ ᎤᎾᏁᎳᏁ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎤᏂᎷᏨ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᎳᏅᏏᎴ ᎧᎸᎬᏗᏢ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎵᎬᏗᏢ ᎾᎾᎾᎾᎾᎾ ᎠᎾᎵᏓᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᎠᏂᏌᏏ ᎪᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᎩᏎ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎧᎸᎬᎢᏗᏢ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.

"ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎤᏃᏢᏁ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏙᎯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏒᎢ," ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏥᏛᎠᏯ, Ꮎ ᎾᏝᎬ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ Ꮎ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏒᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏗᏕᎦ.

ᎾᎿ ᎠᏐᏴ ᎤᏅᏕᏨ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᏆᎦᏟ ᎤᏃᏢᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎾᎾᎾᎾᎾ ᎤᏪᏴᎢ, ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏓᏂᏆ, ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏌᏏ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᏥᏛᎠᏯ ᎤᏛᏅ ᏩᏥᏂ ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐᏊ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎲᎢ ᏧᏭᎪᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎨᏥᏁᎸ ᎦᏙ, ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ.

ᏥᏛᎠᏯ ᎾᏍᎩᏍᏊ ᏄᏪᏒ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎸᏉᏗ ᎤᎨᏳᎯ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ ᎢᏕᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏁᏗ ᏩᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎨᏥᏃᎮᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎨᎦᏅᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ, ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎸᎢ. ᎠᏁᏯᏔᎯ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎦᏓ ᎨᏒ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎢᏧᎳ ᎠᏂᏍᎦᏯ, ᎤᏅᏌ ᎨᏒ, ᏓᎾᏟᏴᎡᎲ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏗᏍᏗᏅᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏄᏓᎸᏥᏙᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᎯᏳᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎨᏩᎾᏛᎪᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

"ᎤᎪᏗ ᏗᎬᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏟᎶᎥ ᏓᏍᏗᏅᏅ ᎠᏂᏰᎵᏙᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏂᏓᏙᎵᎬᎾ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏟᎢᎵᏙᎲ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎨᏥᏁᎸ ᎦᏙ ᎠᎴ ᏩᏥᏂ ᏧᎾᏓᏰᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ," ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. "ᏁᏗ ᏩᏗ ᏗᎬᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗ ᎢᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎨᎶ ᏚᏫᏘᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏩᏥᏂ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎧᎾᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ."

ᎤᏛᏅ Ꮎ ᏗᎬᏙᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏩᏗ ᎤᎾᏁᎸᏔᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏩᏥᏂ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᎲ ᏗᎧᎾᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎤᏅᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏚᎢᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎤᎴᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᏱᏄᏛᏔᎾ.
"ᏁᏗ ᏩᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᏌᏊ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎤᏂᏃᎲᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ," ᎤᏛᏅ ᏥᏛᎠᏯ. ᏥᎸᏩᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏬᎯᏳᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏚᎳᏏᏛᎢ."

ᎤᏛᏅᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᎿ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᎦᏅᏨ ᎠᏁᏯᏔᎯ ᎠᏛᎩᏍᎬ ᏓᎪᎵᏰᏍᎬ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎤᏅᏗ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏗᏐᏴ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏚᏂᎾᎥ ᏓᎪᎵᏰᏍᎬ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎵ ᎠᎭᏂ. Ꮭ ᏳᏬᎯᏤ ᏚᏩᏛᎲ ᎤᏩᏌ ᏚᎾᏙᎥ ᏕᎪᏪᎸᎢ.

"ᎢᎦ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗ ᏂᎦᎥ ᎣᎩᏠᏯ, ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ, ᏝᏃ ᏱᏥᎦᏔᎭ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏁᏙᎲ ᎠᎭᏂ, ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎯ, ᎢᎦ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏚᎾᏙᎥ ᏕᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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