CHC gets extra funds for Ancient Village

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
01/10/2011 07:08 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Ancient Village tour guides J.D. Ross, left, and Steven Daugherty explain to tourists during the summer of 2010 how the Cherokee stomp dance is performed around a fire. ARCHIVE PHOTO
Main Cherokee Phoenix
An artist’s rendering of the proposed new Ancient Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Okla. COURTESY PHOTO
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center recently received funding that is needed to continue working on its new Ancient Village.

The Tulsa-based Mary K. Chapman Foundation committed $100,000 to the project that began this past summer. When completed, the new village will consist of 20 wattle and daub structures, 14 interpretive stations and a detailed historic landscape set on four acres of land.

Wattle and daub is a building material used for making walls, in which a woven lattice of wooden strips called wattle is daubed with a sticky material usually made of some combination of wet soil, clay, sand, animal dung and straw.

Two new pilot structures, a Cherokee summer and winter home made of wattle and daub and river cane, were recently completed.

“This is a wonderful Christmas present,” said CHC Executive Director Carey Tilley. “A special thank you is due to (former principal chief) Ross Swimmer for his work on this and very special appreciation is owed to Cherokee Nation citizen Donne Pitman who serves as a (Chapman) foundation trustee for his faith in and enthusiasm for the project.”

Tilley added that appreciation is due to CN citizen Mary Ellen Meredith for her donation of $5,000 to kick off the Village Endowment Fund.

The new funding will be combined with a previous commitment of $250,000 from Cherokee Nation Entertainment and an in-kind donation of more than $36,000 from the Boyd Group, an architectural firm, for the village design.

Architect Charles “Chief” Boyd designed the original ancient village in 1966.

Overall, the village project is estimated for $1 million, and the first of three phases is expected to be completed this summer.

“We have some very strong momentum building for raising the necessary funds to complete the new village,” Tilley said.

Eight house pairs of winter and summer homes, winter and summer council townhouses, an orchard, ball field, gardens and a re-circulating stream are some of the features planned for the new village. Plants and trees important to Cherokee people will also be planted throughout the village, including river cane.

The permanent, living exhibition will be set in the early 1700s just before increased trade between the Cherokee and their white neighbors brought more non-traditional items into the Cherokee world.

The working name for the village is Kanusita, which is the Cherokee word for the Dogwood tree. Tilley said the name serves as a placeholder for the type of name that will be given to the new village.

“We want to get the community of Cherokee speakers involved in the final naming,” he said.

Tilley said the official name must be Cherokee, be easy for the public to pronounce and spell and follow one of the historical naming patterns for Cherokee towns.

Professor Alfred Vick of the College of Environmental and Design at the University of Georgia has assisted the CHC with plans for the new village. He said the previous village was not an ideal location to build a historically accurate Cherokee village because of the topography was not flat, especially for the creation of a plaza.

So land adjacent to the current village and an area used for overflow parking will be used for the new village that includes a flat area for a plaza.

From May to September, the village would have a minimum of 14 interpreters, dressed in a blend of deerskin and other natural materials as well as period trade cloth, to demonstrate traditional Cherokee skills, play traditional Cherokee games and share traditional Cherokee stories. In addition, costumed guides will relate events from Cherokee history while re-creating a picture of everyday Cherokee life 300 years ago.

Tilley said he expects the larger and more accurate village will boost regional tourism, and with the increase in visitation, provide an opportunity to more richly portray the Cherokee story.
ᏣᎳᎩ

By WILL CHAVEZ
ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎦᏃᏣᎸᏍᎩ

ᎠᏫ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.-- ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎾᏞᎬ ᏚᏂᎩᏒ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎤᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏃᏢᎯᏏᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏚᎾᏁᎳᏛ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ.

ᏔᎳᏏ ᎤᏩᎫᏍᏓᎢ Mary K. Chapman ᎠᎧᎻᏗ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᏌᏊ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏃᏢᎯᏏᏍᎬᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎪᎦ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ. ᎠᎵᏍᏆᏙᏅᏃ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏤ Village ᎠᏃᏢᎯᏏᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎦ ᏓᏓᏁᎴᏍᏗ ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯ ᏗᏤ ᏝᏬᏘ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ, ᏂᎦᏓ ᎢᎦ ᏧᎾᎴᏫᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢᏗ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎦᏓ ᎠᎲᎢ.

ᏝᏬᏘ ᎬᏗ ᏓᏄᎸᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ walls ᏓᏃᏢᏍᎬᎢ, ᎾᎾᏃ ᏓᏅᏍᎪ ᏧᏍᏗ ᏧᏩᏯᏝᏅ ᎠᏓ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎩᏍᎪ ᏃᏊᏃ ᏝᏬᏘ ᎤᏃᏢᏅ ᎤᎦᏣᎴᏍᏗ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎢ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ ᏓᏄᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏅᏍᎨᏗᎢ.

ᏔᎵ ᏗᏤ ᏧᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲ ᏗᎪᎵᏰᏓ ᎪᎦ ᎤᎾᏁᎳᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏠᏯ ᏂᏕᎬᎾ ᎾᏃ ᎡᏘ ᏂᏚᏅᏁᎸ ᏚᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲ ᎯᎢᏃ ᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎪᏛᏗ ᏚᏂᏍᏆᏛ ᎾᏝᎬᎢ.

“ ᎢᎦ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏓᏂᏍᏓᏲᎯᎲ ᎣᎩᏁᎸ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏄᎬᏩᏳᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏰᎵ Carey Tilley ᏧᏙᎢᏓ. “ᎠᎵᎮᎵᏤᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ (ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏔᏅ) Ross Swimmer ᎯᎠ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Donne Pitman ᎾᎿ ᎬᎳ (Chapman) foundation ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏥᏰᎸᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎦᏟᏯ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖᎸᏍᎬᎢ.”

ᎤᏁᏨ Tilley ᎾᎿ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᏤᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎨᏯ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Mary Ellen Meredith ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎠᏓᎴᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᏳᏅᏙᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎠᏐᏴ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎦᏕᏃᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎯᎢᎾ ᎢᏤ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᏗᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎦᏳᎳ ᏓᎲᎢ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎯᎦᏍᎪᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏗᏴ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎦ ᏦᏍᎪᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎾᎿ Boyd ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ, ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎵᏍᎩᏗᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᏗᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ Village ᎠᏃᏢᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎤᏓᏅᏖᎸᎢ Charles “Chief” Boyd ᏧᏬᏪᎳᏅ ᏧᏬᏢᏅ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᏂᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏔᏅ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏃᏢᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏥᎪᏢᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏪᏘ Village ᎾᎿ 1966 ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏧᏃᏢᏅᎢ.

ᏂᎦᏓ, ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ Village ᎪᏢᎯᏐᏗ ᎠᏎᎸ ᏧᎵᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏌᏊ ᎢᏳᏆᏗᏅᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏦᎢ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎪᎦ ᎤᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗ.

“ᎢᎦᏓ ᏓᏓᏁᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ Village ᏗᎬᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏟᏂᎩᏓ ᏂᎬᎾᏅ ᏗᎬᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎥᎦᏟᏏᏍᎬ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎥᎪᏢᎯᏐᏙᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Tilley.

ᏧᏁᎳ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᏙᏛᎾᏁᏍᎨᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎦ ᏧᎾᏁᎳᏗᏍᏗᎢ, ᎪᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎦ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗ, ᎤᎪᏓ ᎠᏓᏔᏅᏍᎩ ᏙᏛᏂᎧᏂ, ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ, ᎠᏫᏒᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏑ ᎤᏪᏴ ᎡᎦ ᏗᏐᎢᏃ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢ ᎤᏂᏫᏒᏛ ᎾᎿᏂ. ᎠᏛᏒᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏕᏈᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎨᏒ Ꮎ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏛᏂᎧᏅᎾ ᏂᎬᏋ, ᎢᎯᏯ ᎢᎬᏩᎪᏗ.

ᎯᎠ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏂᎬᎾ ᏥᏛᏃᏢᏂ, ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏛ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎥ ᏃᏊ ᏥᏛᏂᏁᏉᎥᏒ ᎠᎾᎵᏱᏛᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏃ ᎠᏂᏲᏁᎦ ᎾᎥ ᏄᎾᏓᎴᏫᏒ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏧᎾᎴᏅᎮ ᎠᏂᏲᏢᏍᎬ ᏧᎾᎴᏅᎮᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᏂᏁᎸᎢ.

ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏧᏙᏍᏙᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎧᏅᏏᏔ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎧᏅᏏᏔ ᎢᏡᎬᎢ. Tilley ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᏚᏙᎥ ᏗᏙᎵᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎢᏤ Village ᏥᏛᏙᏢᏂ.

“ᎣᎦᏚᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏠᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏃᏊ ᏙᏧᎪᏔᏅ ᏦᏍᎪᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.

Tilley ᎤᏛᏅ ᏕᏙᎥᎢ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏍᏍᏗ, ᎠᎯᏓ ᎢᎦᏪᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎪᏪᎶᏗᎢ ᎾᏂᎥ ᎢᎬᏩᏂᏪᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏥᎨᏒ ᏧᏂᎮ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗ ᏧᏃᏍᏙᏗ ᏕᎦᏚᏩᏗᏒ ᏂᏛᎾᏛᏁᎵ.

Professor Alfred Vick ᎾᎿ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏒᎶᎯ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏎᎯᎯ ᎢᎬᏅᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ Georgia ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᏂᏍᏕᎵᎭ CHC ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏤ ᏥᏛᏃᏢᎾ VILLAGE.

ᎤᏛᏅ Ꮎ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏥᎪᏢᏒ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᏱᎩ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎣᏍᏗ ᎧᏃᎮᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏥᏚᏂᏚᎮᎢ ᎦᏙ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎨᏎᎢ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏩᎾᏕᏍᎩ ᏱᎩ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎾᎿ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

ᏃᏊᏃ ᏧᏙᏛᎾᏠᎯᏍᏔᏂ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎾᎠᏂᎨ ᎨᏎ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎤᎾᏕᏅ ᏚᏂᏚᎿᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏃᏊᏥ ᏗᎦᏚᎴᏂ ᏧᏂᏗ ᏥᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏛᏅᏔᏂ ᎠᏃᏢᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ ᎢᏤᎢ.

ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᎾᏃ ᏚᎵᏍᏗ ᎢᏯᏍᏘ, ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᏂᏚᎲᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏂᎦᏚ ᏯᏂ ᏚᏂᎧᎮᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ, ᏚᎾᏄᏪᏍᏗ ᎠᏫ ᎦᏁᎦ ᎠᎴ ᏐᎢ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏗᎧᏃᏗ ᎠᎿᏬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᎾᎡ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎾᎵᏱᏛᏍᎨ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎾᏅᏁᎮ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎲ ᎤᏃᏢᏗᎢ, ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᎲᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢᏅᎢ. ᏫᎧᏁᏉᏓ, ᏧᎾᏅᏩ ᏗᎾᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᏚᏂᎧᎮᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏢᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎸᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢᏧᏈ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ.

Tilley ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᏬᎯᏳ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎾᎥᏂᎨ ᎢᏳᏅᏁᎸ ᎤᏃᏢᎯᏌᏅᎢ, ᎧᏁᏉᎬ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᎠᏂᎷᎬ, ᎾᎿ ᎠᏙᏢᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᎪᏩᏘᏍᎬ ᎾᎿᏂ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏁᎲ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • (918) 207-3961

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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