Mosquito bites can be more than itchy

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/12/2018 12:30 PM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
According to the Centers for Disease Control, mosquitos can spread viruses that make you sick or, in rare cases, cause death. Except for the southernmost states in North America, mosquito season starts in the summer and continues into fall. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL
Main Cherokee Phoenix
A Centers for Disease Control map of the continental United States showing the most recent West Nile virus activity. WNV is the most common virus spread by mosquitoes in the continental United States. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL
TAHLEQUAH – According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the most effective way to avoid getting sick from viruses spread by mosquitoes when at home and during travel is to prevent mosquito bites.

“Mosquito bites can be more than just annoying and itchy. They can spread viruses that make you sick or, in rare cases, cause death,” the CDC website states. “Although most kinds of mosquitoes are just nuisance mosquitoes, some kinds of mosquitoes in the United States and around the world spread viruses that can cause disease.”

The CDC states that mosquitoes bite during the day and night, live indoors and outdoors and search for warm places as temperatures begin to drop. Some will hibernate in enclosed spaces such as garages, sheds and under (or inside) homes to survive cold temperatures. Except for the southernmost states in North America, mosquito season starts in the summer and continues into fall.

Mosquito-borne viruses in the continental U.S.

West Nile virus is the most common virus spread by mosquitoes in the continental United States. People can also get sick from less common viruses spread by mosquitoes such as La Crosse encephalitis or St. Louis encephalitis. In rare cases these can cause severe disease or even be deadly. Most people infected with these viruses do not have symptoms, or have only mild symptoms like fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

• West Nile is a virus most commonly spread to people by mosquito bites. In North America, cases of WNV occur during mosquito season, which starts in the summer and continues through fall. There are no vaccines to prevent or medications to treat WNV. Fortunately, most people infected with WNV do not have symptoms. About 1 in 5 people who are infected develop a fever and other symptoms. About 1 out of 150 infected people develop a serious, sometimes fatal, illness.

• Most cases of Saint Louis encephalitis virus or SLEV disease have occurred in eastern and central states. Most people infected with SLEV have no apparent illness. Initial symptoms of those who become ill include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting and tiredness. Severe neuroinvasive disease (often involving encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain) occurs more commonly in older adults. In rare cases, long-term disability or death can result. There is no specific treatment for SLEV infection. Care is based on symptoms.

• Most cases of La Crosse encephalitis virus or LACV disease occur in the upper Midwestern and mid-Atlantic and southeastern states. Many people infected have no apparent symptoms. Among people who become ill, initial symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting and tiredness. Some who become ill develop severe neuroinvasive disease (disease that affects the nervous system). Severe LACV disease often involves encephalitis and can include seizures, coma and paralysis. Severe disease occurs most often in children under the age of 16. In rare cases, long-term disability or death can result from La Crosse encephalitis. There is no specific treatment for LACV infection. Care is based on symptoms.

• The Zika virus is still a problem in many parts of the world. Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands are areas with risk. Many areas in the United States have the kind of mosquitoes that can spread Zika. It can cause birth defects in babies born to women who were infected during pregnancy. The CDC recommends pregnant women and their partners and couples considering pregnancy know the risks and take prevention steps.

Prevention

• Use insect repellent: When used as directed, Environmental Protection Agency-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Use an EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, Oil of lemon eucalyptus, Para-menthane-diol or 2-undecanone.

• Cover up: Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.

• Keep mosquitoes outside: Use air conditioning or window and door screens. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your home or hotel, sleep under a mosquito bed net.

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/14/2018 08:30 AM
Hospital benefit coordinators will assist Na...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
09/13/2018 10:06 AM
Saint Francis and Oklahoma State University Medical Center ...

BY CHRISTINA GOOD VOICE
Special Correspondent
09/10/2018 02:17 PM
The possession of marijuana – medical or recreational ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/07/2018 04:57 PM
Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will be at the...

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
08/30/2018 08:35 AM
Wings Fitness members have the opp...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
08/24/2018 12:40 PM
The latest medical marijuana rules wil...