Glenn partakes in Native physicians’ youth initiative

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/27/2018 04:00 PM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Peyton Glenn
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Peyton Glenn, second student from left in third row from bottom, was one of 24 teenagers nationwide to recently participate in the 20th Association of American Indian Physicians’ National Native American Youth Initiative program. The program educates and encourages Native American students to pursue careers in health professions. COURTESY
OKLAHOMA CITY – Cherokee Nation citizen and high school senior Peyton Glenn was one of 24 teenagers nationwide to recently participate in the 20th Association of American Indian Physicians’ National Native American Youth Initiative program.

Glenn, a student at Westmoore High School in Oklahoma City, attended the nine-day program held in Washington, D.C., this summer.

“This opportunity opened my eyes to the countless possibilities available to Native Americans in the medical field. I was able to solidify my interest in the medical field,” Peyton, the daughter of Ryan and Stephanie Glenn, said.

The AAIP sponsors the program to educate and encourage more Native American students to pursue careers in health professions.

“We expose the students to a variety of health careers,” NNAYI Program Director Gary Lankford said. “The summer program allows them to visit national health organizations and academic institutions.”

The students were taken on educational trips that included tours of the National Institutes of Health, George Washington University School of Medicine, Indian Health Service, Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Association of American Medical Colleges and the National Library of Medicine.

Students attended lectures and interactive workshops that featured guest speakers who are physicians, researchers and educators in the fields of medicine and health care.

“It’s important for the students to hear from these health care professionals. They’re successful Native Americans who serve as role models and mentors. They inspire our students to continue their education and set high goals,” Lankford said.

NNAYI was created in 1998 to increase the number of American Indian/Alaska Native students entering health professions and biomedical research. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for admission to college and professional schools. Students also receive information regarding financial aid, counseling, and other college-related assistance.

To be selected for the NNAYI summer program, students must be age 16-18 and express interest in medicine, health care or biomedical research. For more information, visit www.aaip.org
or call 405-946-7072.

Education

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/06/2018 05:27 PM
Presentations should tell the stories of past and pres...

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/06/2018 08:17 AM
Educators will take six cra...

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
11/27/2018 09:17 AM
He hopes to attain a career as...

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/21/2018 02:06 PM
Tribal Councilor Keith Austin will have an opportunit...

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/20/2018 08:27 AM
New courses in film, script writing, per...

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/14/2018 04:01 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Foundation is offering Native American students a free...