CN dedicates unique food center in Nowata

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/15/2012 08:28 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation Food Distribution Manager Bud Squirrel describes various meats Food Distribution clients can shop for at the new CN Nowata Food Center, which opened June 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation leaders cut a dedication ribbon for the new Nowata Food Center on June 8. Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor Dick Lay, left, Dist. 5 Tribal Councilors Cara Cowan Watts and Buel Anglen, Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor Meredith Frailey, Dist. 5 Tribal Councilor Lee Keener, Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor Chuck Hoskin Jr., CN Chief of Staff Chuck Hoskin Sr., Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden take part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
NOWATA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation leaders joined Nowata residents on June 8 in dedicating the tribe’s new Nowata Food Center, which contains a senior nutrition center and CN Food Distribution store.

CN Family Assistance Director Jerry Snell said this is the first time the Nation has combined a Food Distribution store and senior nutrition center in one building.

“All of the nutrition sites are community-based. What will make this one unique is that we actually own it, and we will operate this site whereas at all the others sites we rely on the communities to supervise and run the facility,” he said. “This will be the first one that we have that we will be totally responsible for.”

The senior nutrition site is the 13th CN-funded site that serves meals to the elderly.

Snell estimates 45 to 60 seniors initially will use the facility, which includes a kitchen and a dining room.

“We hope that after we get going that the number of participants will grow,” he said.

Snell added that plans are to have the facility open three days a week, but it may open more often later if needed.

“I want to believe that Nowata would be just like all of our other counties. A lot of our seniors are living on fixed incomes and have medication to purchase, and sometimes they’ll buy that medication before they’ll buy food,” he said. “We’ll be able to provide them three meals a week, and we’ll even have carryouts for them.”

In 2011, CN senior nutrition sites served nearly 44,000 meals and delivered more than 17,000 meals to homebound elders. No income guidelines apply for senior nutrition eligibility.

Snell said the nutrition center would also be used as a community center where community members can gather for meetings and events. Also, CN social workers will visit the center to provide information about tribal services and programs.

CN citizen Helen Collier, 90, of Nowata, said she is glad the nutrition center is open because it allows her to socialize with other elders.

“It’ll be a social place for me,” she said. “I’ve been watching it since they started clearing the ground. It is beautiful, and it’s really something Nowata has needed a long time.”

Food Distribution Manager Bud Squirrel said clients began using the Food Distribution store to shop for food in March, which replaced semi trucks that delivered food to about 55 qualified families in the area.

With deliveries, families were handed food from the back of the truck in all types of weather, he said.

With the Nowata Food Center, families can shop in the comfort of a Food Distribution store that includes shelves filled with cereals, soups, fresh and canned fruits and vegetables, beans, juices and evaporated milk. Freezers stocked with various meats and cheeses are also in the store.

“They got to come inside to a lot more comfortable surroundings and come in and shop for their foods on their own instead of getting it handed to them out of the back of truck in a box,” Squirrel said.

Eligible families can shop in the store once a month, and the amount of food they receive depends on family size. To be eligible for Food Distribution services, a participant must be a citizen of a federally recognized tribe, have valid identification and meet income guidelines.

Squirrel said since March, 145 families have been added to the Food Distribution list and that he expects the store to be serving 250 families in June.

The city of Nowata donated land for the Nowata Food Center, which is located adjacent to the tribe’s Nowata Health Center on Galer Avenue.

Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor Chuck Hoskin Jr., who helps represent Nowata County, said a direct benefit to the Nation’s investing in Nowata, first with a new health clinic and now the 5,000-square-foot food center, is employment.

“We created jobs here, and when you think about that, it generates a lot economic activity for a community that desperately needs it,” Hoskin said. “And it’s a community on the move in part because of the investment that we’re making in Nowata. This building represents our commitment to taking care of the least of our brothers and sisters.”

For more information about Food Distribution or senior nutrition sites, call 1-800-865-4462 or visit www.cherokee.org.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏃᏩᏛᎢ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.– ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎾᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏛ ᏃᏩᏛ ᏗᏂᏁᎳ ᎾᎿ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᏧᏁᎵᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ Ꮎ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎢᏤ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᎵᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏛ ᎠᏂᎨᏴᎵ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ.

ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏗᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ Jerry Snell ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᎾᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏌᏊ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ. “ᏂᎦᏓ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᏚᏃᏢᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᎾᎳᏏᏙᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦᏤᎵᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏓᏓᏂᎩᏍᏔᏂ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏕᏓᎵᏍᎦᏍᏙᎢ ᎤᏂᏁᏥᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏂᎩᏍᏗᏍᎪ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎰᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎯᎠᏃ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎢᎦᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.”

ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᎦᏚᏏᏁ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏈᏴᎲ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᏓᏁᏠᎰ ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ. Snell ᎤᏎᎸ ᏅᎦᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᏯᏂ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗᎢ.

“ᎤᏚᎦ ᎣᎬᎭ ᏃᏊ ᎠᏂᎩᏒ ᎤᏂᎪᏕᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎷᎨᏍᏗ ᏛᏛᏏ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. Snell ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᎤᏃᎮᏢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᎢ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏂᏍᏚᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᏒᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏯᏂᏍᏚᎢ ᎣᏂ ᎤᏩᎪᏗᏗᏒ ᏳᏂᏂᎬᎦ.

“ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎠᏉᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏠᏯ ᏚᏃᏢᏒᎢ. ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ ᎠᏁᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏒᏅᏓ ᎢᏳᏓᎵ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏂᎩᏍᎦ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎦᏍᏙᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎤᏂᏩᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏐ, ᎠᎴ ᏴᏓᎭ ᏅᏬᏘ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎤᏂᏩᏍᎪ ᎾᏃ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᏓᏁᏢᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᏦᎢ ᏯᎵᏍᏓᏴᏅ ᏒᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏁᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᏫᏛᎡᏗ ᎬᏩᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ.”

ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏂᎨᏴᎵ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏓᏁᏠᎲ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏯᏂᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏫᏓᏂᏁᎲ ᏚᏁᏅᏒ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎬᏩᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ. Ꮭ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎠᏃᏢᏍᎬ ᏯᏅᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬᎢ.

Snell ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎾᎥ ᏗᏂᏁᎳ ᎤᎾᏓᏟᏐᏗ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏓ ᏳᏂᎭ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏱᏂᏛᎾᏛᏁᎵ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏩᏁᏙᎲᏍᏗ ᏩᏂᏃᎮᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏏᏗᏒ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎸᎯᏙ ᏧᎾᏙᏢᎯ.
ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Helen Collier, ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎾᎿ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎡᎯ, ᎤᏃᎮᎸ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᎵᏍᏚᎢᏒ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᏳᏭᏪᏙᎳ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏟᏃᎮᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ.

“ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᏆᏟᏃᎮᏓᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎠᏆᎦᏎᏛ ᏧᎾᎴᏅᎮ ᎠᏂᎳᏅᏓᏍᏗᏍᎬ Ꮎ ᎦᏙᎢ. ᎤᏬᏚᎯ, ᎠᎴ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏄᏓᎴᎢ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏄᏂᏂᎬᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ.”

ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏗ ᎧᏁᏥᏙ Bud Squirrel ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏅᏱ ᏥᎸᎸᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏁᏟᏴᏍᏔᏅ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏓᏆᎴᎷ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏂᎾᏌᏁᏍᎩ ᎠᏲᎯᎲ ᏯᏛᎾ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎩ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎠᏁᎲ.
ᏳᏂᏲᎳ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᏂᎷᎬ ᎨᏥᏁᎲ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎣᎾᏗᏢ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏓᏆᎴᎷ ᎠᏂᏍᏚᎢᏍᎪ ᎦᏙᏊ ᏱᏄᏍᏗ ᏙᏯ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ, ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎳ ᏃᏊ ᎤᏂᏲᎮᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏯᏔᎾᎸ ᎠᏝᎾᎡᏍᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏌᎾᎴ ᎠᎩᏍᏗ, ᎤᎦᎹ, ᏠᎨᏏ ᎤᏛᏄᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎵᏗᏓᏅ ᎠᏓᏔᏅᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏤ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ, ᏚᏯ, ᎤᏓᏁᏅ ᏓᏟᏍᏛ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏅᏓ. ᏗᎦᏁᏍᏓᎳᏗᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎦᏝᎾᎣᎢ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎭᏫᏯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏅᏓ ᎦᏚᏅ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎶᎢ.
“ᎤᏂᏴᏟᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏯᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏓ ᎨᏒ Ꮭ Ꮎ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏓᏆᎴᎷ ᏯᏂᏍᏚᎢᏍᎨᏍᏗ ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏌᎶᎵ.

ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎦ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎾᏓᎾᏁᏒᎲᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᎾᏅ ᏌᏊ ᎢᏳᏩᎪᏗ ᏏᏅᏓ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎬ ᎠᏎᎯᎰ ᏯᏂ ᏚᎾᏓᏘᎾᎢ ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ. ᎠᎩᏍᏗᏃ ᏲᏚᎵ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏓᏁᏗᎢ, ᎯᎢᎾ ᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎨᎳ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏩᏥᏂ ᎨᎪᎵᎬᎢ , ᎤᎳᎢ ᎠᏆᏂᏲᏍᏗ ᎠᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᏎᎸ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎪᏢᏍᎬᎢ.
ᏌᎶᎵ ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏅᏱ ᏥᎧᎸ, ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎤᏂᏁᏉᏨ ᎨᎪᏪᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎣᎬᎭ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎣᎩᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏥᏁᏗ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᎧᎸᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎦᏙᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᏙᏢᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᏃᏩᏛ ᎥᏰᎸ ᏄᏛᎾᏕᎬ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎾᎿ Galer Avenue.

ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏅᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᏗᎦᎳᏫᎦ Chuck Hoskin Jr., ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏍᏕᎸᎯᏙᎰ ᏃᏩᏛ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎠᎾᎵᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏃᏩᏛᎢ, ᎢᎬᏱ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏤ ᎤᎾᏓᏁᎵ ᏴᏫ ᏄᏛᎾᏕᎬ ᎨᏥᎪᎵᏰᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏃᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏅᎩ ᏧᏅᏏᏯ ᎢᎩᏓ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ, ᏕᎨᏥᏁᏢᎢ.

“ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏚᎵᏍᏚᎢᏌ ᎠᎭᏂ, ᎠᎴ ᏱᏣᏓᏁᏖᎵ, ᎤᏙᏢᏅ ᎤᎪᏗ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᏂᎬᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Hoskin. “ᎠᎴ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎧᏁᏉᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏙᏢᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏃᏩᏛᎢ. ᎯᎠ ᏣᏓᏁᎳ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᎭ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎲ ᏙᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎣᏣᏓᏅᏟ ᎠᎴ ᏦᎩᏙ.”
ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏂᏯᏙᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎨᏴᎵ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ, ᎯᎢᎾ ᏎᏍᏗ ᏫᏣᏟᏃᎮᏓ 1-800-865-4462 ᎠᎴ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏣᎪᎵᏰᏓ www.cherokee.org.

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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