Cherokee experiences cultural exchange in England

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
07/27/2012 08:34 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
School children from Salisbury, England, take part in a cultural presentation given by Cherokee Nation citizen Corey Still of Tahlequah, Okla. COURTESY PHOTO
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Corey Still, left, visits with Plymouth Mayor Michael Wright and Lady Mayoress Deborah Osborne on June 16 in Plymouth, England. COURTESY PHOTO
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Corey Still stands with a view of the Parliament of England near the Thames River during his recent visit to London. COURTESY PHOTO
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Dinton Village School children pose with Cherokee cultural ambassador Corey Still after a cultural presentation in England. COURTESY PHOTO
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Corey Still returned home on July 18 to Tahlequah after spending nearly two months in England.

The Cherokee Nation citizen arrived in London on May 22 to work as a liaison and intern. He assisted with the “Emissaries of Peace” tour organized by Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism and guided delegations from the CN, United Keetoowah Band and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians when they arrived on June 15 to tour England.

The “Emissaries of Peace” tour retraced the journey of British Lt. Henry Timberlake and three Cherokee chiefs in 1762 to meet King George III to cement peace between the two nations.

“Everywhere I went I was welcomed with hospitality and kindness,” Still said. “I was fortunate to be able to travel much of the southern country and was surprised to see all the country and woods that they have. It is probably one of the most beautiful places I have had the honor of experiencing in my life.”

Still said his initial plan was to act as a tour guide for the Cherokee delegation. Eventually he took on the role of an ambassador by dressing in traditional Cherokee clothing, introducing the delegation in Cherokee and singing songs in Cherokee for English hosts.

“I was once again honored when they asked me to do this. To think, that at my age of 21 years, I would be able to say that I have visited with these different dignitaries, spoke to them in my language and shared with them the culture that I was raised in,” he said. “We were all welcomed with great hospitality and kindness everywhere we went. From the lord mayors that we met, to the people on the streets, we felt like we were old friends who came to visit.”

Still said his most interesting visit was the Wilton House located in southeastern England. It was one of the places the Cherokee delegation of Ostenaco, Cunne Shote and Woyi visited 250 years ago.

“Not only was the estate something to be in awe of, the family that lived there were welcoming and excited that we were there,” he said. “The XVIII Earl of Pembroke, who resides at the Wilton House with his wife and young daughter were welcoming as could be with the delegation and even allowed us access to the private section of the house for afternoon tea.”

At each stop, the Cherokee delegation presented gifts to their hosts, including blankets and baskets. Still said each stop added to his knowledge about the Cherokee delegation’s 1762 visit because he got to walk in the Cherokee leaders’ footsteps.

“Nothing puts learning about a subject in history in full context until you visit the sites you study about first hand. To stand in the location those three chiefs stood 250 years ago is a mind-blowing aspect. It brings history to life being able to travel there and witness those things,” Still said.

After the delegation returned home on June 23, Still visited schools across England making history and cultural presentations.

“Being able to go and tell about my people to another country’s up-and-coming generation and to impart to them that not all American Indians are like what they see on the television was a great thing,” he said.

A student at the University of Oklahoma, Still is working toward a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies and is expected to graduate in 2013. He said he wants to pursue a master’s degree in higher education leadership at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah and a doctoral degree before eventually finding work serving the Cherokee communities.

Still was able to travel to England through the Cherokee Nation Foundation.

“The foundation has helped me so much in my higher education career and now this. I just truly feel blessed,” he said. This experience has given me a much broader view on life and the world. I have witnessed stunning sites, seen beautiful artwork that is hundreds of years old and traveled in the footsteps of my ancestors….This journey will help afford me a vast new perspective and has only furthered my resolve to work with culture, language and community.”

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᏁᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ. – Corey Still ᎤᎷᏨᎢ ᎦᏰᏉᏂ ᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᏫᏓᏩᏛᎯᏓ ᏔᎵ ᏯᏅᏓ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎠᏂᎦᎵᏏᎢ.

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏁᎳ ᏭᏂᎷᏤ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᎩᎵᏏᎢ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏔᎵᏁ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏗᏟᏃᎮᏟᏙ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ. ᏓᏍᏕᎸᎯᏙᎲ ᎾᎿ “ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏙᎯᎢ” ᎠᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙᎲ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏅ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙᎯ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎸᎯᏙ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ, ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎯᎠ ᏦᎢ ᎢᏧᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᏭᏂᎷᏤ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᏍᎩᎦᏚᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᎦᏖᏃᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᎵᏏᎢ.

ᎾᎿ “ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏙᎯᎢ” ᎤᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙᎴ ᎤᏂᏍᏓᏩᏛᏎ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ British Lt. Henry Timberlake ᎠᎴ ᏦᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪᏔᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᏚᎾᏠᏎ ᎤᎾᏟᏃᎮᏔᏁ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏣᏥ ᏦᎢᏁᎢ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏙᎯ ᎢᏳᏅᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᎠᏰᏟ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ.

“ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᏊ ᎢᎸᏢ ᏱᏬᎩᎷᏥ ᏴᏫ ᏕᎬᏆᏓᏂᎸᎬᎢ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏓᏅᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Still. “ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏫᎬᏪᏓᏍᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᏁᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎩᏍᏆᏂᎪᏒ ᏥᎪᏩᏘᏍᎬ ᎢᎾᎨ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᏙᎯᏳ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏬᏚᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏥᎸᏉᏗᏍᎬ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎬᏇᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎬᎩᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎴᏂᏙᎲᎢ.”

Still ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏅ ᎨᏒ ᏗᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎨᏎ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓ ᏩᏁᏙᎲᎢ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᎩᏒ ᏗᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏄᏬᎥ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎪᎯᎩ ᏥᏓᏅᏄᏬᏍᎬᎢ, ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᏕᎬᏁᎲ ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᎬᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏃᎩᏒ ᏗᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏲᏁᎦ ᎠᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎯ.

“ᏏᏊᏃ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎬᏆᏛᏛᏂ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ. ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ, ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏌᏊ ᏯᏆᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᎩᏃᎮᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏩᏇᏙᎸ ᎦᏥᏩᏛᎯᏙᎸ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᎠᏂᏙᎾᎢ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎾᎿᎢ,ᎦᏥᎵᏃᎮᏔᏅ ᎠᏮᏌ ᎠᎩᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏥᏃᎯᏎᎸ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᏆᏛᏒ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎢᎩᎲ ᎢᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏂᎦᏓ ᏕᎪᎦᏓᏂᎸᏨᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏘ ᎨᏒ ᏂᎬ ᎣᏤᏙᎲᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᏓᎬᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎶᏗ ᎠᏃᏎᎲ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏙᎦᏙᎵᏨ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᏙᎲ ᏕᎦᏅᏅ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏔ ᎾᏍᎩᏯᏊ ᏦᎦᎵ ᏧᏙᏥᏩᏖᎰᎶ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᎨᏒᎢ,” Still ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏴ ᎣᏣᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎲ ᎣᏤᏙᎲ ᎯᎠ Wilton House ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᎩᎵᏏᎢ. ᎾᎿᏃ ᎤᏁᏙᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏥᏅᏏᏓ Ostenaco, Cunne Shote ᎠᎴ ᏬᏱ ᎤᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎴ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏎᎢ.

“ᏝᏃ Ꮩ Ꮎ ᎠᏓᏁᎵᏮ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏍᏗ ᏱᎨᏎᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏂ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎠᏂᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᏓᏅᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎣᏤᏙᎲ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩ XVIII Earl of Pembroke, ᎾᎿ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎠᏂᏁᎸ ᎤᏓᎵᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏁᏣ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏓᏅᏗ ᏕᎪᎦᏓᏂᎸᏨᎢ ᎣᏤᏙᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎤᏂᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎤᏤᏟᏓ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᎾᎿ ᏘᎢ ᎣᎦᏗᏔᏍᏗ ᏒᎯᏰᏯᏗᏢ.”

ᏃᏣᎴᏫᏍᏔᏂᏒ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎦᏅᏏᏓ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᏗ ᏓᏂᏁᎲᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏦᏥᏩᏛᎯᏙᎯ, ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏧᏁᎦᎭ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏔᎷᏣ. Still ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎾᎴᏫᏍᏔᏂᏒ ᎧᏁᏉᎬ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏍᎬ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ ᎤᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎸ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎦᏅᏏᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᏔᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏪᏙᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏓᏘ.ᏙᎯ ᏚᎾᎳᏏᏂᏙᎸᎢ.

“Ꮭ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎧᎵ ᎬᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎬᏂ ᏱᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎸ ᏱᏪᏙᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ. ᎠᎴᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢ ᎠᏂᏦᎢ ᎤᏂᎬᏩᏳᎯ ᏚᎾᎴᏅ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᎯᏍᏗ. ᎬᏃᏓᏊ ᎢᎦᎦᏛ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏪᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎪᏩᏛᏗᎢ ᎯᎢᎾ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Still.

ᎢᎤᏂᎷᏣᏃ ᏗᎦᏅᏏᏓ ᏙᏧᏁᏅᏒ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᏔᎵᏍᎪᏦᎢᏁ, Still ᏚᏩᏛᎯᏙᎸ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᎵᏏᎢ ᏕᎧᏃᎯᏎᎲ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

“ᎬᏆᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎦᎦᏥᏃᏎᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏍᏛ ᎠᎴ ᏥᏚᎾᏛᏏᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮭ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎤᏂᏠᏱᎭ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏓᏂᎪᏩᏘᏍᎪ ᎠᏓᏴᎵᏛᏍᎩᎢᎯ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ, Still ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ꮟ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏁᏍᏗ Bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies ᎠᎴ ᏙᏛᏍᏆᏗ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏦᎦᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎤᏃᎮᎸ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ Ꮟ ᎦᎸᎳᏗᏟᏴ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏧᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏕᎵᎬᎧᎸᎬ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎠᎴ doctoral ᎤᏂᏅᏗ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᏁᏍᏗ ᎤᏚᎵ Ꮟ ᎾᏩᏘᏍᎬᎾᏊ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ.

Still ᎡᎵᏊ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏭᏪᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᎵᏏᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ Foundation.

“ᎯᎢᏃ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎢᎦ ᎬᎩᏍᏕᎸᎭ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏕᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎯᎢᎾ ᏂᎬᏆᏛᏁᎸᎢ. ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎯᎢᎾ ᎾᏆᏛᏁᎸ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏒ ᎠᎩᏁᎳ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏫᏓᏩᎧᎾᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎴᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎡᎶᎯ. ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏏ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏛ ᏧᏬᏚᎯ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ, ᎠᎩᎪ ᏧᏬᏚᏨ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᎶᏒᏍᏓ ᎢᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏇᏙᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎩᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᏚᎾᎳᏏᏂᏙᎸᎢ….. ᎯᎠ ᏧᎨᏓ ᏛᎩᏍᏕᎸᎯ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎢᏤ ᎠᎩᎪᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏒ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᏆᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ, ᏃᏊᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ.”

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
10/14/2020 08:21 AM
Cherokee author Traci Sorell’s award-wi...

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/13/2020 10:22 AM
The virtual market is exp...

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
10/02/2020 12:47 PM
Cherokee author Traci Sorell’s book tells o...