Capitol’s renovation into history museum nearly finished

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
03/08/2019 09:00 AM
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Main Cherokee Phoenix
The first floor of the Cherokee Nation’s history museum will consist of a gift shop, some gathering space and nearly 1,000-square-foot of exhibit space that will constantly change. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
The Cherokee Nation’s history museum will include the tribe’s origin story. The museum will be located in the tribe’s former Capitol in Tahlequah. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
The forced removal of Cherokee people from their original homelands in what is now the southeastern United States will be a part of the new Cherokee Nation history museum. COURTESY
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee National Capitol Building is a downtown landmark and will continue to be as the tribe’s Cultural Tourism department readies the 152-year-old building to be a history museum.

“We’re getting ready to open this summer as a Cherokee National History Museum. We’ve been working over this past year to renovate this site,” Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said.

“We’ve been working several years to restore the exterior of the building. About a year ago we started on the interior, and now we’re getting ready to start on the actual exhibit installation.”

He said the museum is being developed to use both floors of the historic building. The first floor will contain a gift shop, some gathering space and nearly 1,000 square feet of exhibit space that will periodically change. The museum’s upstairs will have a full story of Cherokee history from ancient times to present day.

He added that the museum would be “a one-stop shop” for Cherokee Nation history.

“We’re actually going to tell the Cherokee story from time immemorial to present day. So we’ll have a lot of exciting exhibits, a lot of artifacts from institutions like the National Museum of the American Indian, Gilcrease Museum and the Oklahoma Historical Society,” he said.

Plans are still being made for the opening ceremony in June, Owens said.

Construction on the building began in 1867 two years after the American Civil War ended. Most of Tahlequah’s public buildings had been destroyed during the war. After the building was completed in 1869, Cherokee leaders used it for a courtroom and to hold council meetings.

“It was the first building that independently housed all three branches of Cherokee Nation government, post removal (Trail of Tears). It was used by the Cherokee Nation to house the executive, legislative and the court system right up until statehood,” Owens said. “After that… it was owned by the county, and it operated as a county courthouse until the late 70s. The Cherokee Nation gained ownership of it after that time and then used it as its own courthouse until just very recently.”

Before Oklahoma statehood in 1907, an act of Congress abolished the tribe’s government. The CN regained its government in 1975 after it elected a chief and formed a constitution that was ratified in 1976. The tribe now operates under a constitution that was written in 1999, ratified in 2003 and implemented in 2006.

The Capitol Building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961. In 2013, the CN began a restoration project to preserve the building’s original appearance, including roof repairs with historical-era shingles, new decking, new doors and windows and added a cupola to the roof. The project also includes adding a new back porch.
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He e ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He e ...

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/15/2019 08:39 AM
BRIGGS – Twin Pines Ranch has been selected by Cherokee Nation One Fire Victims Services to conduct Equine Therapy Classes for their clients.

The classes are funded...

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/11/2019 10:46 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The local chapter of Oklahomans for Equality held its sixth annual Tahlequality Pride Festival on June 29, and Cherokee Nation citizens participated at almost every level of the event.

CN citizen and director of the ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/03/2019 08:53 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Ned’s pub was taken over last Saturday when the Arts Council of Tahlequah held its annual fundraiser at the establishment. Cherokee citizens once again contributed greatly to the event’s success.

According to CN citizen and ACT Vice President Callie Chunestudy, approximately $1,400 was raised to help pay for the ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/02/2019 02:36 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Twelve world language teachers from across America came to Tahlequah in June for the third annual IGNITE Language conference where they shared their knowledge on language methodology to a diverse audience of Indigenous language teachers...

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
06/21/2019 05:56 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Singing and dancing to songs of the 1960s such as Jan & Dean’s hit “Little Old Lady from Pasadena” and Marty Robbins’ classic country ballad “El Paso,...

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/06/2019 07:27 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizens, along with other northeast Oklahoma residents, dealt with multiple t...