Rutherford recreating Cherokee feathered capes

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
12/27/2013 08:35 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
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Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford ties together weaving to be used for the backing of a feather cape using goose feathers. European explorers talked about the Cherokees wearing capes made from feathers of flamingos, parrots, turkeys, geese and ducks. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Goose feathers tied to woven netting make up a feathered cape created by Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford. Cherokee people were known to wear the capes as early as the 16th century. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Lisa Rutherford of Tahlequah models one of her feather capes at the 2013 Cherokee Art Market in Catoosa, Okla. She is one of a handful of Cherokee artists reviving the art of making feathered capes that were once worn by Cherokee people. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Goose feathers tied to woven netting make up a feathered cape created by Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford. While researching Cherokee clothing and pottery she became interested in feather capes that Cherokee people once wore. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Black goose feathers are ready to be tied to netting for a feather cape by Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford. Since learning how in early 2011, she has made 10 feather capes and has five on order from customers. COURTESY PHOTO
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Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford’s feathered cape made of goose feathers has won numerous awards. Rutherford teamed up with Cherokee National Treasure Tonia Weavel to learn how to make feathered capes and mantles. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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In this portrait by Thomas E. Mails titled “Installation of the new (Cherokee) War Chief,” the chief is shown wearing a feathered mantle. The portrait is from the book “The Cherokee People” by Thomas E. Mails. COURTESY PHOTO
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In this portrait by Thomas E. Mails titled “The Great War Chief in War Regalia,” the chief is shown wearing a feathered mantle. The portrait is from the book “The Cherokee People” by Thomas E. Mails. COURTESY PHOTO
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Lisa Rutherford’s studio space in the Cherokee Arts Center is a testament to her artistic interests. Her pottery in the room mixes with her textile and beadwork. Also in the room are loose goose feathers that are to be part of capes she’s creating because she’s one of a handful of Cherokee artists who can make feathered capes and the only one currently doing so.

Rutherford said pottery is her primary art form, learning from Cherokee National Treasure Jane Osti of Tahlequah. However, she also studied Southeastern-style beadwork with Cherokee National Treasure Martha Berry of Tyler, Texas. And somewhere along the way, some Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians friends sparked her interest in 18th-century Cherokee clothing, helping her create outfits from that period.

She now demonstrates making traditional Cherokee arts at shows and other events dressed in 18th-century Cherokee clothing. But while researching Cherokee clothing and how tribal pottery was stamped with textiles she became interested in feather capes that were once worn by Cherokee people.

“The Eastern Band had feather capes, and I wanted one too to go with my 18th-century clothing,” she said. “(Hernando) de Soto described these capes as early as 1540. He described different feather mantles and capes. Different explorers talked about the Cherokees wearing them as late as the 1700s. They were described as being on a net base with the brightest colored feathers from flamingos, parrots, turkeys, geese, ducks – the brighter colors were the preferred colors.”

So far Rutherford has only used goose and turkey feathers for her capes but wants to try other feathers such as pheasant. She places lighter-colored feathers among darker feathers on her capes to create accents.

Rutherford teamed up with Cherokee National Treasure Tonia Weavel of Tahlequah to learn how to make capes and mantles. Based on her research, Rutherford believes a mantle is longer and requires more feathers while a cape is shorter and mainly covers one’s shoulders.

“We (she and Weavel) got together and decided if our ancestors could figure this out we can make one. So we borrowed a cape a museum professional had made in Pennsylvania and we studied the thread pattern. It was really hard. It took us six days to learn how to weave that. I finally wove one. I was able to make my first feather cape,” Rutherford said.

Along with weaving the netting, finding good feathers is challenging, Rutherford said. And they can be expensive. A pound of dyed, sanitized goose feathers costs $80. After culling a pound of feathers, she said she might throw half of them away because they do not meet her standards.

“It just takes a lot of time. You have to individually bend the quill on each feather and bend over a wire to make a nice round eye to sew through, and then you lash them down,” she said. “There are probably 750 to 800 feathers in a (over the shoulder) cape, so it takes a significant amount of time.”

One of her hip-length mantles has approximately 2,200 feathers.

She said the capes and mantles are warm and likely had practical use for Cherokee people to help keep them warm in cold weather. In her research she has found only Cherokee men wore the mantles.

For a medium-length black cape on display in her studio she has won three second-place awards, a first-place award and three best of division awards at art shows.

Rutherford said she she wants to branch out into painting, but only after filling her cape orders.

“You have to do what sells when you’re a full-time artist even though you’d like to do something more fun. You have to budget your time and balance your priorities.”

Since learning the craft in 2011, Rutherford has made 10 capes and has customer orders for five others.
She said Oklahoma Cherokees are not interested in wearing capes with their traditional clothing because wearing 18th-century style clothing has not caught as it has with the Eastern Cherokees.

“They’ve been very popular,” Rutherford said. “I’ve sold several to Eastern Band contestants for Miss Cherokee. I’ve sold some for exhibits.”

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ.—Lisa Rutherford ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏅ ᎤᏢᎾᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎾᎿ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏁ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏄᏩᏅᎢ. ᏗᎦᏓᎫᎦ ᏧᏬᏢᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᏓᎵᏍᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏅᏬᎢ ᎬᏗ ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᏢᏗ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᏌᏌ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏕᎦᏃᎯᎵᏙᎰ ᎾᎿ ᎢᏧᏩᎾᏙᏒ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏐᏢᏗ ᎪᏢᏍᎬ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏌᏊ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎪᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎡᎵᏊᏏ ᏗᎬᏬᏢᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏗᏐᏢᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎩᎳᏊ ᎨᏒᎢ.

Rutherford ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏓᎫᎫ ᏭᎸᏉᏛ ᏧᏬᏢᏗᎢ, ᎠᏕᎶᏆᎡᎰ ᎾᎿ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ ᎨᎳ Jane OstiᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎡᎭ. ᎾᏍᎩᏂᏃ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎦᎾᏮᎧᎵᎬ ᏧᏃᏢᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏯᎶᏗ ᎪᏢᏔᏅᏍᎩ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᎡᎭ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᎾᎢ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎪᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎠᎪᎵᏨᎢ Martha Berry of Tyler, Texas. ᎠᎴ ᎢᎸᏢ ᎠᎢᏒ, ᎩᎶ ᎧᎸᎬᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᎳ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎤᎾᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏄᏬᏗ, ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏧᏍᏗ ᏓᎾᏄᏬᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎢᏳ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ.

ᏃᏊᏃ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏁᎰ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎡᏔ ᏚᎾᏄᏬᎥ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏄᏅᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏐᎢ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᏱᏚᎾᏄᏩ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏢ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏄᏬᏗ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᏧᏯᎸᏍᎬ ᎠᎪᎵᏱᎥᎲᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏄᏬ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᎦᏓᎫᎫ ᏓᏃᏪᎶᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏄᏬ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎩᏓC ᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᎠᏐᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎢᏳᏩᎪᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏩ ᏚᎾᏄᏬᎡᎢ.

“ᏗᎧᎸᎬᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᏁᎭ ᏚᏂᎾᎢ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᏗᏐᏢᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᏌᏊ ᏗᏙᎵᎦ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏢ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏧᎾᏄᏬᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ. “(Hernando) de Soto ᎤᏃᎮᏢ ᎯᎠ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᎾᎯᏳ ᏍᎩᎦᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎤᏃᎮᏞ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏂᏕᎬᏅᏕ ᎠᏅᏬᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ. ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎤᏂᏯᎸᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎨ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᎾᏄᏬᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎤᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏥᎨᏎᎢ.
ᏓᏂᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᏓᎾᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎨ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏚᎾᏄᏮ ᎭᏫᏂ ᏂᏕᎬᏅᏛ ᏫᏚᏍᎪᏍᏗᏴ ᎨᏎ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎾᏍᎩ flamingos ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ, ᏬᏯ ᏓᎶᏂ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ, ᎬᎾ ᏌᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎧᏬᏄ ᏧᏂᎩᏓᏟ--ᏧᏍᎪᏍᏓ ᏧᏂᏑᏫᏓ ᏫᏚᏂᎸᏉᏛ ᎨᏒ ᏧᏂᏑᏫᏓ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Rutherford ᏌᏌᏊ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏧᏩᏌ ᏧᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎬᎾ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏚᎵᎭ ᏧᏁᎸᏙᏗ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᎾᎨ ᎡᎯ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ. ᏂᏕᎬᏃᏗᏍᎪ ᎤᏍᎪᎸ ᏧᎵᏑᏫᏓ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏧᎵᏏᎦ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏓᏑᏴᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏐᏢᏗ ᎪᏢᏍᎬ ᏅᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᎵᎶᎯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ.

Rutherford ᎤᎵᎪᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏔᏅᎢ Tonia Weavel ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎡᎯ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏧᏬᏢᏗ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏬᎢ. ᎤᎦᏛᏂᏙᎸ ᎪᏪᎸ, Rutherford ᎤᏬᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏅᏬᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏅᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎢᏗᎬᏃᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏐᏢᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᎳᎯᏯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏌᏆᎦᏘ ᎦᏅᏬ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎫᏢᏍᎦ ᎦᏅᏬᎢ.

“ᏃᏍᏓᏛᏁᎭ (Rutherford ᎠᎴ Weavel) ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏄᎪᏔᏅ ᎢᏳ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᎾ ᏳᏃᎳᏥ ᎯᎠ ᎡᎵᏊᏃ ᏱᏃᏢᎾ. ᏃᏊᏃ ᎣᎩᎾᏙᎵᏨ ᎠᏐᏢᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎾᎥ ᎠᏂᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏅ ᎾᎿ Pennsylvania ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎩᎾᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏍᏗ ᎦᏱᏫᏍᏛ ᏂᎬᏅ. ᎢᎦᏃ ᏍᏓᏯ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᏑᏓᎵ ᏧᏙᏓᏆᏗ ᎣᎩᏂᏱᎵᏙᎸ ᎣᎩᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎣᎩᏅᏗᎢ. ᎩᎳᎯᏃ ᎠᏮᎾ ᏌᏊᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᏬᏢᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᎠᏐᏢᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Rutherford.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏅᏍᎬ, ᏗᏴᏩᏛᏗ ᏦᏍᏓ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏟᏂᎬᏗ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Rutherford. ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᏱᏙᏩᏍᎩ. ᏑᏓᎨᏓ ᎠᏑᏫᏍᏓᏅᏗ, ᏗᏑᏱᏓ ᏌᏌ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᏁᎵᏍᎪᎠᏕᎸ. ᏯᏆᎴᏅᎯ ᏗᎦᏑᏱᏍᎬ ᏑᏓᎴᏓ ᏗᎩᏩᏒ ᏧᎩᏓ, ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏱᏟᎢᎦ ᎤᏟ ᏳᏚᏚᎦ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏩᏙᏗ Ꮭ ᏗᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᏱᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎪᏢᏍᎬ.

“ᎪᎯᏗ ᏓᏟᎢᎵᏙᎭ. ᏌᏊᎭ ᎤᎩᏓᏟ ᎡᎳᏗ ᏗᏴᏈᏛᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏯᏅ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏐᏆᎸ ᎢᎬᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎨᏰᏫᏍᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏙᏗ ᏌᏊᎭ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏯᏛᎾ ᎠᏎ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎦᎵᏉᎯᏧᏈ ᎠᎴ ᏁᎳᏧᏈ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ (ᎤᏐᏢᏓ ᎦᏅᏬᎢ)ᎤᎾᏐᏢᏓ, ᎡᎵᏃ ᎪᎯᏓ ᏓᏟᎢᎵᏙᎭ.” ᏌᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎧᏍᎨᏂ ᎤᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎠᏅᏬ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎳᎵᏧᏈ ᏧᎩᏓᏟ ᏂᏕᎬᏓ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏬᏍᏗ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪ ᎤᎦᎾᏩ ᎢᏳᏅᏗ ᏧᏴᏟ ᏂᏕᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎪᎵᏱᎢᏙᎲ ᎠᏩᏘᏍᎪ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏍᎦᏯ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏓᎾᏄᏬᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎧᏍᎨᎾ ᎢᏗᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᏓᏃᏢᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎠᏰᏟ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎬᎾᎨ ᎠᏐᏢᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᎾ ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏗ ᎤᏬᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏓᏠᏌ ᏦᎢ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᏌᏍᏛ, ᎢᎬᏱᏃ ᎠᎴ ᏦᎢᏁ ᏬᏌᏂᏴ ᏂᎬᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏅᎢ.

Rutherford ᎤᏛᏁ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᏑᏫᏒᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏰᏚᏍᏆᏓ ᏧᎾᏓᏅᏒ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ.

“ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏂᏩᏍᎬ ᎪᏢᏗ ᎨᏐ ᎥᎪᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᏱᎩ ᏃᏢᏍᏊ ᏱᏣᏚᎵ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏱᏣᏚᎵ ᏦᏢᏗᎢ. ᎠᏓᏁᎶᏗ ᎨᏐ ᎠᏠᏅᏓᏕᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏯᏛᏁᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏱ.”

ᎬᏩᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏬᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ, Rutherford ᎦᏳᎳ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᏧᏬᏢᏅᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏳᎳ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᏏᏚᎸᎳ ᏧᎾᏓᏅᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅᏃ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ Ꮭ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏱᏅᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᎰ ᏧᎾᏅᏬᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏗᏐᏢᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏧᎾᏄᏬᏓ ᏱᏚᎾᏅᏬᎠ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏓᎾᏄᏬᏍᎬ ᏁᎳᏚ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏧᎾᏄᏬᎥ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎢᏕᎲᎢ ᎾᏃ ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ.

“ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓᏃ ᏚᏂᏱᎸᏐᎢ” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Rutherford. ᎢᎸᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᎩᎾᏗᎾ ᎧᎸᎬᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᏂᎯ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏔ ᎢᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᏩᏌ. ᏫᏓᎩᎾᏗᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᏢᏓ ᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ.”

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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