CN donates $120K for Dwight Mission renovation

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
07/07/2014 08:37 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Peter Newbury Executive, director of Dwight Mission Camp and Conference Center, speaks on June 27 during celebration for a $120,000 pledge by the Cherokee Nation, which will be matched by the Walton Family Foundation. After renovations, the three-story schoolhouse near Marble City, Okla., will be a heritage center and have a museum and office space. The third floor has a 200-seat auditorium, which also will be renovated. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Two women tour the 200-seat auditorium of the historic Dwight Mission schoolhouse near Marble City, Okla. The Cherokee Nation on June 27 pledged $120,000 to restore and preserve the schoolhouse where many Cherokee children were educated from 1917 to 1948. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee children from Sequoyah County and the surrounding area were educated at the Dwight Mission schoolhouse beginning in 1917. Dwight Mission is situated near Sallisaw Creek and Marble City, Okla. The mission moved there from Arkansas in 1830. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
An artist’s rendering of the Dwight Mission schoolhouse shows how the nearly 100-year-old building will look after it is restored. The Cherokee Nation pledged $120,000 to restore and preserve the schoolhouse where many Cherokee children were educated from 1917-48. The Walton Family Foundation matched the tribe’s pledge. COURTESY
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter

MARBLE CITY, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation on June 27 pledged $120,000 to Dwight Mission in Sequoyah County for restoring and preserving its schoolhouse that was built nearly 100 years ago.

Peter Newbury, Dwight Mission Camp and Conference Center executive director, said the tribe’s gift would “catapult” the organization into the future because the Walton Family Foundation in Bentonville, Ark., will match it.

“That 120 becomes 240 and that helps us with this building (schoolhouse), and that’s the focus right now,” Newbury said.
After renovations, the three-story schoolhouse will be a heritage center and have a museum and office space. The third floor’s 200-seat auditorium also will be renovated.

The schoolhouse was built in 1917 and was the primary school for the mission from 1917 until 1948 when the school closed. In the 1980s and 1990s, the building hosted Dwight Mission summer camps.

“The building is incredibly sound and ready to be reborn,” Newbury said.
During a ceremony, CN officials joined Dwight Mission officials and community members to celebrate the pledges made by the tribe and the Walton Family Foundation.

“I’m proud to share with you today that Cherokee Nation, along with Cherokee Nation Businesses, our business arm is pledging $120,000. Making those dollars go even farther is a match from the Walton Family Foundation. That’s tremendous,” Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden said. “Dwight Mission played a valuable role for Cherokee youth in northeast Oklahoma. When the mission was built in Indian Territory, it was one of the first schools for Native children.

For multiple generations of Cherokee children this schoolhouse was part of their growth and their development. That is why it is so important to support its preservation today.”

Dwight Mission was established in 1820 near Russellville, Ark., but relocated in 1830 to its present-day site near Marble City. It is Oklahoma’s oldest school.
Named in honor of Rev. Timothy Dwight of Yale University, the mission “has added luster to the name by the great educational work accomplished among the Cherokee Indians,” according to the Chronicles of Oklahoma.

Warren Schaub of Oklahoma City attended the ceremony in honor of his grandfather Frederick Schaub, who came to Indian Territory in 1895 from Parsons, Kan., as a circuit minister for five Cherokee churches. After ministering to Cherokee people for five years, Dwight Mission leaders asked him to stay and reopen the school.

“It was opened and closed a lot, but it was closed at the time. They talked him into opening the place and getting it ready. He and a helper did that,” Schaub said.

Frederick supervised Dwight Mission from 1900 to 1911 when he had to move to New Mexico because his wife needed to live in a drier climate because of her health. Warren Schaub’s father, Dwight, was born at Dwight Mission.

The Indian Mission Training School served students for 119 years, offering practical instruction, academics and religious teaching until it closed in 1948. It reopened in 1951 as a camp and conference center and continues to serve thousands of guests each year.

Today, buildings are available for rent for family reunions, conferences or other events and summer camps are held for youth, Newbury said.

“Basically, if you need a place to meet, eat, and sleep, we’re that place for you,” he said.

Dwight Mission is a nonprofit facility overseen by two boards: Dwight Mission Inc. and Agency for Dwight Mission. To learn more, visit www.dwightmission.org.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ 120,000 ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏉᏱ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᎬᏁᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᎮ ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏍᏓ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ.

Peter Newbury, ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏴᏫ ᏧᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎧᏁᏥᏩᏙᎯ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎤᎾᏓᏁᎸ “ᎠᏂᎩᏍᏗ” ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏫᏗᎦᏛ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ Walton ᏏᏓᏁᎸ Foundation in Bentonville, Ark., ᎤᏠᏯ ᎢᎦ ᏛᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏂ.

“ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯ ᏃᏊ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏍᏕᎵᎭ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ (ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ), ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏩᎦᏙᏔᏅ ᏃᏊ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ Newbury.

ᎣᏂᏃ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏛ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ, ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢ ᎢᏗᏲᏓᏢᎯ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᏃᏊ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅᎯ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏧᏂᏴᏍᏗ. ᏦᎢᏁ ᎠᏲᏓᏢᎲ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᏕᎦᏍᎩᎴᏍᏗ ᏃᎴ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎾᏅᏁᎭ.

ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲᎢ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎤᏂᏑᎵᎪᏨ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏍᏚᏅᎢ. ᎾᎿ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᏍᏆᎸᎡᎸ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎪᎦ ᏚᏁᏙᎸᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ Ꮟ ᎤᏝᏂᎩᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᏕᎱᎯᏐᏗᎢ” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ Newbury.

ᎾᎿ ᏓᏂᎳᏫᎥ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏂᏁᏥᏙ ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏛ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏁᏥᏙ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᏁᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏒ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎾᎿ Walton Family Foundation.

“ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏥᎪᎵᏰᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎪᎯ ᎢᎦ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ, ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮎ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᏁᏢᏍᎦ 120,000. ᎠᏙᏢᏍᎦ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎠᏅᎯᏴ ᏭᎷᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎾᎿ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ Walton Family Foundation. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎣᏍᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᏓᎴᏁᎯ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Joe Crittenden. “ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏁᏍᎨᎮ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎬᏥᏁᎸ ᎦᏙ ᎨᏎᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏌᏊ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏓᏁᏟᏴᏓ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏂ ᏚᎾᏛᏏ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏅ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎦᎫᏍᏛᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᎪᎯ ᎢᎦ.”

ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᏙᏢᎾ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎥ Russellville, Ark., ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏂᎲᏎ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏦᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎤᏂᏲᏢ ᏃᏊ ᏧᏙᏢᎭ ᎾᎥ ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏩᎦᏴᎵᏴ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᏚᏃᏍᏔᏅᏃ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎵᏣᏙᎲᏍᎩ Rev. Timothy Dwight of Yale University, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏥᏅᏏᏓ “ᎤᏁᏉᏣ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏧᏙᏍᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ,” ᎪᏪᎳᎾᎥᎢ ᎾᎿ Chronicles ᎾᎿ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ.

Warren Schaub ᎾᎿ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᏦᏏᏗ ᎡᎭ ᎤᏪᏙᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏚᏓ Frederick Schsub, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎷᏤ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏁᎲ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᏂᏓᏳᏂᎩᏓ Parsons, Kan., ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏕᏲᎯ ᎠᎵᏣᏙᎲᏍᎩ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᏂᎳᏫᏍᏗᎢ.

ᏃᏊᏃ ᏓᎵᏣᏙᏁᎲ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎾᎿ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏓᏘᏂᏙ ᎤᎾᏛᏛᏅ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗᏊ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏚᎢᏐᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎤᎵᏍᏚᎢᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏍᏚᎲᏍᎬ ᎤᏳᏩᎪᏓ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎠᏍᏚᎲ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ. ᎤᎾᏟᏃᎮᏔᏅ ᎤᏍᏚᎢᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏛᏅᎢᏍᏙᏗ. ᎤᏩᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Schaub.

Frederick ᎧᏁᏥᏙᎯ ᎨᏒ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩᎢ ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏈᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏌᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎤᏓᏅᏍᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏂᏍᏆᏂᏃ ᏭᏂᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏓᎵᎢ ᎤᏂᎬᎬ ᎤᎧᏲᏗᎨ ᎤᏃᎴᎢ ᏙᎯ ᎤᏕᏗᎢ. Warren Schaub ᎤᏙᏓ, Dwight, ᎾᎿ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᎵᏏᎾᎲᏍᏙᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᏯᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ, ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏁᎶᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᏍᏚᏅ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ. ᎤᎵᏍᏚᎢᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᏌᏊ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎬᏱᎵᏒ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᏙᎲ ᏂᏓᏕᏘᏴᎯᏒᎢ.

ᎪᎯ ᎢᎦ, Ꮟ ᏓᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎩᎶ ᏳᏚᎵ ᏧᏅᏙᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓ ᏧᎾᏙᎵᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏥᏓᎾᏓᏟᏏᏍᎪᎢ ᏱᎩ, ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎦ ᏥᏓᏁᏙᎱ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Newbury.
“ᏙᎯᏳ, ᏱᏣᏂᎬᎦ ᏗᏣᏠᎯᏍᏗ, ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᏣᏢᏗᎢ, ᎾᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ,” ᎤᏛᏅ.

ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎪᏢᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᏚᏃᏢ ᎠᏂᏁᏥᏙ: Dwight Mission Inc. ᎠᎴ Agency for Dwight Mission. ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, visit www.dwightmission.org.

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – A Canadian company has built the first piece of the disputed Keystone XL oil ...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
05/22/2020 03:39 PM
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) – South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem said May 20 she is appealin...