Career Services opens Pryor office

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
10/08/2014 08:08 AM
PRYOR, Okla. – Cherokee Nation and Pryor officials dedicated a Career Services office on Oct. 1 in the city’s industrial park to help supply a work force for area companies.

Tribal Councilor Janees Taylor, who represents Dist. 15 that includes Pryor, said the office would be used to help place people in jobs in Mayes County and surrounding counties. The 6,000-square-feet of office space is located in the MidAmerica Industrial Park.

“We have an industrial park that we’re hoping that we can tap into and help supply their needs for a work force. We’re also going to be doing some career training here, so it’s kind of a general one-stop shop for people that need jobs in this area,” Taylor said.

She added that the CN had a Career Services office in Pryor, but the location was not ideal and she believes that “a lot of people gave up” before they could find the office. The new office is at 2945 Hwy. 69 A, which is easily accessible from Hwy. 69 and next to the Cherokee Nation Industries building in the industrial park.

“This office is going to be visible. The companies are going to know it’s here as well as people seeking jobs who are going to be able to find us a lot easier,” she said. “There is a sea of opportunity out here in this industrial park, and I would like to see every Cherokee in this area, that wants a job, to come through our doors and go to work that very day.”

To assist people seeking jobs, Career Services career navigator Charbrice Evans said the CN recently received a Job-Driven National Emergency Grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. The grant is meant to help people, Cherokee and non-Cherokee, who have been out of work 27 weeks or longer.

“We can help them with training to try to get them employed, to make them more employable and hopefully get them a good paying job,” Evans said.

Evans said she counsels people on finding jobs that suit and interest them. If a job seeker doesn’t have the necessary skills for the job he or she is interested in, Evans sets them up with training to get those skills.

Evans said her office was expecting to hire a person to work with area companies to establish contracts for the on-the-job training so people seeking help through the Career Services office can work at those companies to gain experience and skills.

“We need this building because we have Cherokee people who are ready to go to work. We don’t open places like this for the heck of it. We open it because the demand is there,” CN Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “We are in the middle of one of the biggest economic expansions in the history of the Cherokee Nation. We open it because we’re in the middle of a boom when it comes to jobs.”

He added that thee Career Services office is situated in an area “that is poised for growth.”

Career Services Executive Director Diane Kelley said the vision for a Career Services office in Pryor came from Brent Taylor, Tribal Councilor Taylor’s husband, who saw the “significant value” of the tribe having a presence in the MidAmerican Industrial Park.

“He felt like this is where we needed to be, and we’re very excited about today’s event. It’s long overdue,” Kelley said. “We’ve already had contact with some of the businesses here asking us to come and visit with them about trying to recruit people for the hard-to-fill jobs.”

She said the tribe was also expecting to open a one-stop shop on Oct. 15 in Sallisaw to provide access to various CN programs in one building, including Career Services.

“We just opened an (Career Services) office in Tulsa, which is a new office. It’s the very first time the Cherokee Nation has had an office in Tulsa. We’ve had a lot of phone calls, a lot of people walking in,” Kelley said. “It was established to help with the Macy’s project in the Owasso area. It’s also an opportunity to roll out our Job-Driven National Emergency Grant.”

Pryor Mayor Jimmy Tramel said the city’s partnerships with the CN and the industrial park will allow people in the area to get the help and training they need to have a career working close to home.

“When you look at this facility what do you see? You see a partner in the Cherokee Nation. You see a partner in the MidAmerica Industrial Park. You see a partner with all of the families and all the communities we have here,” he said. “I’m blessed to be the mayor of such a great community and have such great partners, and I want to say thank you to the Cherokee Nation.”
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎧᏩᏲᎢ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎧᏩᏲ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎾᏅᏁᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏛᎵᏍᏚᎢᏌ ᎾᎿ ᏚᏂᏃᏗ ᎢᎬᏱᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎤᏠᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏧᏂᏌᏙᏯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎾᎥ ᏚᎾᏙᏢᏒ.

ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᏗᎦᎳᏫᎦ Janees Taylor, ᎾᎿ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎰ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏍᎩᎦᏚ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎧᏩᏲᎢ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏛᏅᏔᏂ ᏧᏂᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏧᏂᏩᏛᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏆᏅᎩ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏓᏕᏯᏍᏛ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ. ᎾᎿ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏅᎩ ᏧᏅᏏᏯ ᎢᏯᎳᏏᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏠᏅᏛ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎣᎪᏢᎭ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎣᎪᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎬᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎤᏂᏂᎬᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᏙᏥᏏᎾᎲᏍᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎢᎦᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏗᏏᎾᎲᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎭᏂ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏌᏊ ᏯᎴᏫᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏂᎬᎬ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᎭᏂ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Taylor.

ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎧᏩᏲ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏙᏢᏗ Ꮭ ᏯᏂᏩᏗᏍᎨ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᎯᏳ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏚᎾᏓᏲᏒ” ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᏩᏛᏗ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏤ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ 2945 ᎤᏔᎾ ᎦᏅᏅᎢ. 69 A ᎪᏪᎳ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎯᏓ ᎡᏓᏍᏗ ᏂᏛᏂᎩᏓ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎦᏅᏅ 69 ᎠᎴ ᎾᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏃᏢᏒ ᏓᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ.

“ᎯᎠ ᏧᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎬᎪᏩᏛᏗ. ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᏅᏖᏍᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏂᏲᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎯᏓ ᎤᏂᏩᏛᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᎤᎪᏓ ᏚᏙᏢ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏯᏆᏚᎵ ᎦᏥᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎠᏁᎲ, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ, ᎤᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᏂᏓᏳᏂᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᎦᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏧᏙᏓᏋᏓ.”

ᏗᏍᏕᎸᎯᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏂᏲᎯ, ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᏗᏍᎩ Charbrice Evans ᎤᏛᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎾᏞᎬ ᎤᎩᏒ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᏯᎾᏛᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ U. S. ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ. ᎯᎠ ᎤᏂᎩᏒᎢ ᎠᎬᏩᏢ ᏴᏫ ᏗᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ, ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏲᎯᏍᏔᏅ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏯᎪᎯᎳ.

“ᎡᎵᏊ ᏙᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪ ᏗᏏᎾᎲᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏣᏁᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏂᏩᏛᏗᎢ, ᎤᎾᏅᏙ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏗᎦᎨᏥᎾᏢᏓ ᎨᏐ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᎦ ᎦᎨᎦᏈᏴᎡᏓ ᏱᏗᎨᏥᏁᏢᎾ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Evans.

Evans ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏗᏟᏃᎮᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏂᏩᏛᏗ ᎤᏃᎵᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏛᎢ. ᎢᏳᏃ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏲᎯ ᎤᎵᏏᎾᎲᏍᏔᏅ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎯᎠ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Evans ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎰ ᏓᏩᏛᎡᎰᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᏏᎾᎲᏍᏙᏗ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ.

Evans ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎤᏩᎭ ᏐᎢ ᎠᏏᏴᏫ ᎠᏥᎾᏢᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏧᎾᏓᏁᏤᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎨᏥᏏᎾᎲᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏲᎯ ᎨᏥᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏕᏁᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎤᏁᏉᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏅᏛᎢ.

“ᎢᎩᏂᎬᎦ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏕᎨᎭ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎾᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ. ᏝᏃ ᎤᏬᎸᏛᏋ ᏱᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎪ ᏯᎵᏍᏚᎢᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᏙᏥᏍᏚᎢᏍᎪ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎧᏂᎬᎬᎢ,” ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎵᏍᎩ Chuck Hoskin Jr. ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᎿᏃ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎢᏕᏙᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᏔᏅ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎬᏩᏙᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᎣᎩᏍᏚᎢᏒ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏱᏟ ᎠᏟᎵᏒ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎬᏩᏙᏢᏗ.”

ᎤᏁᏉᎬ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ “ᎾᏳ ᎠᎦᏘᏴ ᎤᏛᎯᏍᏗᎢ.”

ᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᎧᏁᏥᏙ Diane Kelly ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏅᏖᎸ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏙᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎧᏩᏲ ᎤᏓᏅᏖᎸᎢ ᎨᏒ Brent Taylor, ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᏗᎦᎳᏫᎦ Taylor’s ᎠᏂᏁᎳ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎪᎮ ᎾᎿ “ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗᏯ ᎢᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ” ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎤᎾᏂᎩᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ MidAmerica Industrial Park.

“ᎾᎿᏃ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᎬᎬᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎣᏣᎵᎮᎵᎦ ᏥᏄᎵᏍᏔᎾ ᎪᎯ ᎢᎦ. ᎪᎯᎩ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎾᎿ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Kelley. “ ᎦᏳᎵᏃ ᏙᎦᏟᏃᎮᏢᎢᎦᏓ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏦᏥᏩᏛᎯᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᏧᏂᏯᏅᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎢᎦᏓ ᎤᏳᏓ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏐᎢ.”

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᏍᏊ ᎤᎾᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏚᎢᏍᏗ ᏌᏊ ᏯᎴᏫᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏓᎾᏁᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏚᏂᏃᏗ ᏍᎩᎦᏚᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏌᎷᏂᎨᏴ ᎠᏓᏁᏢᏍᎬ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎬᎩᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏌᏊ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ, ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ.

“ᎨᎳ ᎣᎩᏍᏚᎢᏌ (ᏴᏫ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎤᏃᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎳᏏᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏤ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏃᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎳᏏᎢ. ᎤᎪᏗᏃ ᏗᎾᏟᏃᎮᏍᎪ, ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏟᎯᎰ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Kelly. “ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏔᏅ ᎨᏒ ᏗᏍᏕᎸᏗ Macy’s ᎠᏎᎸ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ ᎾᎿ Owasso ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᎤᎾᏟᏅᏓᏕ ᎦᏇᏅᎩᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏅᏛ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ ᎨᏒᎢ.”

ᎧᏩᏲ Mayor Jimmy Tramel ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏗᎦᏚᎲ ᏚᎾᎵᎪᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏴᏫ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᎲ ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎨᎨᏲᏗ ᎤᏂᏂᎬᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᎠᏂᎨ ᏚᏁᏅᏒᎢ.

“ᎯᎢᎾ ᏱᏣᎪᎵᏱ ᎦᏙᎤᏍᏗ ᎯᎪᏩᏘᏍᎪ? ᎯᎪᏩᏘ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ. ᎯᎪᏩᏘ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ MidAmerica Industrial Park. ᎯᎪᏩᏘ ᏧᎾᎵᎪᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎭᏂ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎪ ᎾᎿ mayor ᏴᏋᏁᎸ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎾᎿ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎵᎪᎯ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᏩᏙ ᎠᏆᏗᎢ ᎦᏥᎵᎡᎵᏤᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ.”

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

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