Three C’s of Crawdads: catching, cleaning and cooking

BY JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
08/19/2015 08:00 AM
Audio Clip
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizens Larry, left, and Dustin Shade hunt for crawdads at night in Fourteen Mile Creek in Cherokee County. The father-son duo used homemade gigs to catch the crustaceans. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Father and son Larry, left, and Dustin Shade clean crawdads after gigging them in Fourteen Mile Creek. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Before cooking crawdads, Larry Shade and his family soaks the cleaned crustaceans in hot water with salt. After draining them, the Shades add salt and pepper, cornmeal and then fry them in oil. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Larry Shade, the son of the late Deputy Chief Hastings Shade, cooks crawdads and fried potatoes near the bank of Fourteen Mile Creek in Lost City, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Larry Shade holds a cleaned crawdad just after being caught out of Fourteen Mile Creek in Cherokee County. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Dustin Shade shows a large crawdad he caught. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Larry Shade, the son of the late Deputy Chief Hastings Shade, holds a gig made by his father more than 30 years ago. Larry continues to use the gig to hunt crawdads. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
LOST CITY, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Larry Shade has lived his life in this northern Cherokee County community learning the ways of the Cherokee culture from his grandparents and father, the late Deputy Chief Hastings Shade. Among the cultural aspects he’s learned, one he truly enjoys is crawdad gigging.

Larry gigs crawdads in a section of Fourteen Mile Creek that his family owns.

“It’s just something that my dad always did when we were growing up. He worked, and when he came home that was the first thing we were going to do. We’d go out in the daytime, but a lot of times we’d go out at night, which is a lot easier,” he said. “It’s just a time-honored tradition that we hold true to our culture.”

He said many people who catch crawdads use traps, but he and his family use homemade gigs, something he also learned to do from his father.

“The gigs we are using tonight are all hand-forged by my dad. I’m in my 50s and the gigs that we’re going to use, I was 18 when dad made them,” he said.

Hastings died in 2010 at age 67. He was known as a Cherokee traditionalist and was widely recognized for his work in cultural preservation and as a skilled traditional artisan. He was designated a Cherokee National Treasure in 1991 for his craftsmanship, which included making gigs.

When gigging, Larry said they never catch more crawdads than they can eat. He said he and his family will determine how many crawdads they need to feed everyone and then they’ll go out and catch that amount.
“We always leave some either for the next family or next year’s crop, but we never take more than what we need,” he said. “It’s part of the Cherokee way.”

He said most of the time when he and his family “get together” they go gigging the night before.

“My son, some of his friends and my daughter, we all go out and they know how,” he said. “We go through whether the water is cold or it’s warm, whether it’s leaches or snakes. They understand there’s a few dangers out there, but it’s something that we’ve done all our lives.”

The method the Shades use to catch crawdads is not the easiest, Larry said, but it’s their tradition and it’s how he honors the Cherokee traditions and culture.

“There a lot of easier way to get crawdads, but this is a time-honored tradition for us,” he said. “I’m skilled in what I’ve done and it’s hard for me to do something else.”

Larry said he’s been gigging as long as he can remember.

“Ever since dad trusted us and we were old enough to understand what ‘no’ meant and ‘don’t do that,’” he said. “I’m going to say, 5 or 6 years old…at least 46 years.”

He said years ago catching crawdads was a way to feed one’s family. It’s not like that so much now, but the experience of providing for his family is something he said he would always honor and cherish.

“My grandparents did it and passed it on to my dad. And you know my grandfather, he forged his gigs, which he passed on to my dad,” Larry said. “Dustin’s (one of Larry’s son) with me most the time and I’m glad that he’s with me and I hope that he carries it on. We all won’t be here…too much longer and we hope the traditions that we have…we carry on to our children and even the friends of my sons and daughters. I hope that they carry on.”

Larry said if no one has ever tried gigging they are welcome to email him at larry-shade@cherokee.org.

“I more than welcome you to look me up. Give me a holler. I will definitely take you. We’ll go out one night and I’ll show you the cultural way,” he said. “I invite all Cherokees or any tribal member. If they want to come experience a little history and a little culture.”

Catching

Larry Shade and his family slowly walk through creek waters at night carrying a lamplight, a bucket and a gig. Crawdads feed at night.

The Shades catch both in shallow and deep waters. “So it just depends on where you find the crawdads. You have to go to them. They don’t come to you,” he said.

Larry said many people “bait” a hole the night before by throwing out “chum” or something for the crawdads to feed on and draw them with. “If I clean fish, sometimes I’ll throw that in the water and that’s just so the crawdad have food. I don’t go back and bait the hole. What we do is we do it the sportsman way. I don’t cheat nature,” he said.

Larry said when gigging, get close enough to the crawdad without scaring it, stab the crawdad with the gig in the upper portion of the body because you eat the tail and you don’t want to damage it. He said it’s also important to make sure when hunting at night that one’s light is bright enough to shine through the water and always be aware of your surroundings.

Cleaning and Cooking

After a good catch, Larry and his family clean the crawdads, usually at the creek because it’s just easier.

“The way we clean ours is we take the back part of the crawdad and pull the back part up and we clean the guts and intestines (out). And then we turn the crawdad around and we’ll find the middle fin and we’ll pull the middle fin. That way the intestinal track will come out. Most the time we’ll tear the legs off because the edible part is the front section that we cook and we’ll break up the tail part and just eat the meat in the shell.”

After cleaning, he said they soak the crawdads in hot water with about one tablespoon of salt to ensure the crustaceans are clean and preserved until they’re cooked.

If the Shades don’t cook them that night, Larry said sometimes he’ll place them in just enough water to cover each crawdad with a half teaspoon of salt in a gallon plastic bag and put them into the freezer.

When they’re ready to cook, Larry said he doesn’t add a whole lot to them, just a little season and cornmeal.

He said to lightly salt and pepper and add just enough cornmeal to coat each crawdad.

“Little salt and little pepper and then a little cornmeal and then we’ll fry it,” he said. “I know it’s kind of the unhealthy way, but it’s something that we’ve done our whole lives.”
ᏣᎳᎩ

LOST CITY, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ.- ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Larry Shade Z ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᏗᏜ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏗᎦᏚᎿᎢ ᎦᏁᎳ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᎡᎲᎢ ᎤᏙᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏏ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᏓᎴᏁᎢ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏔᏂᎢ Hastings Shade. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᎸᏈᏛᎢ ᏥᎩ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏕᎦᏘᎲᎢ.

Larry Ꮓ ᏕᎦᏘᎰᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏂᎦᏚ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᎹᏱ ᎤᏪᏴᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏥᎩ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎪᎯ.

“ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎯ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ ᎣᎩᏙᏓ ᏙᎦᏛᏏᏗᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏱᎤᎷᏥ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎥᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᎢ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎲᎢ. ᎢᎦ ᏱᎩ ᎣᏤᏙᎲᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏭᎪᏛᎢ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏒᎢ ᏱᎩ ᏬᏤᏙᎲᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎯᏗᏳ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎦᎸᏉᏗ ᎢᏲᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎣᎩᎭ ᏙᎩᏂᏱᏓ.”

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏭᏂᎪᏛᎢ ᏴᏫ ᏗᏌᏛᏗ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏓᏂᏂᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏮᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏧᏃᏢᏅᎢ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎪᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎡᎸᎢ ᎤᏙᏓ.

“ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᏥᏕᏛᏗᎲᎢ ᎪᎯ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎡᏙᏓ ᏧᏬᏢᏅᎢ. ᎯᏍᎩ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᎶᏒᏍᏗ ᎢᏯᏆᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᏥᏙᏓᏛᏔᏂ, 18 ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏯᏆᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳ ᏥᏚᏬᏢᏅᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Hastings Ꮓ 2010 ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏲᎱᏎᎢ 67 ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳ. ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᎪᎵᎦ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏃᏟᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏏᎾᏏ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏗᎢ. ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏃᏢᏅᏍᎩ ᎨᏥᎸᏉᏗᏍᎩ ᎨᎳ ᎥᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᏃ 1991ᏗᎬᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏬᏢᏅᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᎦᎪᏢᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ.

ᏛᎦᏘᎲᏃ, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ Larry ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏰᏍᏗᏃ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏓᏂᏂᏱᏍᎬᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏱᏓᏄᎪᏓ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏂᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏁᎵᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏂᎥᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏳᏁᎾ ᎥᏍᎩᏭ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏓᏂᏂᏍᎬᎢ.
“ ᏙᏥᏂᏯᏍᎬᏃ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏧᏂᏂᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎡᏘᏴᎢ ᏦᎩᏂᏗ, ᎥᏝᏃ ᏦᎬᏙᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᏙᏥᎾᏫᏗᎰᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏗ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᏛᏁᏗᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏭᎪᏛᎢ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ “ᏳᎾᏓᏟᏌᏂ” ᎾᎯᏳ ᎤᏒᎢ ᏯᏁᎾ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏱᏓᏂᏘᏡᎦ.

“ᎠᏇᏥᏃ ᎠᏧᏣ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎵᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏇᏥ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ, ᏲᏤᎾ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏔᎯ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎠᎹᏱᏃ ᎦᏁᎲᎢ ᎣᏣᎢᏐᎢ ᏳᏴᏜ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏳᎦᎾᏩ, ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏜᏄᏐ ᏯᏂᏯᎠ ᎠᎴ ᏱᎩ ᎢᎾᏛᎯ ᏱᎩ. ᎤᎾᏂᏙᏃ ᏂᎦᏂᏰᎬᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏙᎦᏛᏏ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏂᎬᏲᏣᏛᏁᎰᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏥᏄᏍᏗ ᎢᏳᏛᏁᏗᎢ Shade ᎥᏝ ᎠᎯᏓ ᏱᎩ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Larry, ᎠᏎᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᎭ ᎦᎸᏉᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏂᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ.

“ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎠᎯᏗᏱ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᏗᎦᎦᏂᏱᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᏱᎦᏲᎦᏛᏁᏗ ᎨᏒᎢᏢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᏥᏏᎾᏏᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏆᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏍᏓᏯ ᏄᏓᎴᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎢᏯᏆᏛᏁᏗᎢ.”

Larry Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎦᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬᏃ ᏂᏗᎦᏘᏟᏙᎲᎢ.

“ ᏂᏗᎬᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩᏃ ᎡᏙᏓ ᏁᎳᎩ ᎤᏪᎵᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵ ᎢᏲᎦᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎪᏟᏍᏗᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎦᏛᎬᎢ ‘ᎥᏝ’ ᎠᎴ ᏞᏍᏗ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏱᏣᏛᏁᎸᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. 5 ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ 6 ᏑᏓᎵ ᏓᎬᏛᏂ ᎢᏲᎦᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ … 46 ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏛᎦᏂᏱᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏕᎢ ᏗᎦᎨᎳᏍᏗ ᎨᎲᎢ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ. ᎥᏝ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏱᏄᏍᏗ ᎪᎯᏴᏥᎩ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎬᏔᎲᎢ ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏧᏪᎵᏍᏗᎢ ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎸᏉᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗ.

“ ᏗᎬᎩᏚᏓᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏱ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏁᏲᎾ ᎡᏙᏓ. ᎠᎴ ᎡᏚᏓ, ᏕᎦᏃᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏔᎷᎩᏍᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎨᏲᏅᎢ ᎡᏙᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Larry. “ Dustin’s (Larry’Z ᎤᏪᏥ) ᎣᎩᎾᎵᏲᏐᎢ ᏭᎪᏛ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦᎵᎮᎪᎢ ᎣᎩᎾᎵᎪᎲᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎠᏋᏐᎢ ᏂᎬᏯᎢᏎᏍᏗᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏧᏣ. ᎥᏝᏃ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ… ᏲᏤᎮᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎠᏋᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏲᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᏦᎩᎭ… ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏦᎨᏥ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏓᎩᎧᎲᎢ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᎵᎢ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎠᏋᎭ ᏂᎬᏂᎯᎵᏎᏍᏗᏊ ᎾᏅᏛᎲᎢ ᎤᏠᏱ.”

Larry Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎩᎶ ᎢᎸᎯᏳ ᎤᏁᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ ᏧᏩᏘᏍᏗᎢ ᏳᎾᏚᎵᎠ ᏱᏛᏂᏃᎲᎵ ᎠᎲᏂ larry-shade@cherokee.org.

ᏱᎦᎵᎮᎵᎦ ᏥᏩᏛᏗᎢ. ᏗᏍᏆᏟᏍᏓᏁᎸᎢ. ᏱᎦᏯᏘᏄᎦ. ᎤᏒᏃᎢ ᏱᏁᎾ ᎠᎴ ᏱᎬᏰᏲᎲᎦ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎾᎢᎥᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎨᎳ. ᎢᏳᏃ ᏳᎾᏚᎵᎠ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎪᎯᎩ ᏥᎨᏒ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏲᏟ ᎢᏱᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.”

Catching

Larry Shade ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏍᎦᏃᎵ ᎠᎾᎢᏐᎢ ᎠᎹᏱ ᏗᏨᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᎯᏅᏍᏗ ᏓᏂᏰᎰᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᎵᏣᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ. ᏥᏍᏛᏂᏃ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᏓᏂᏙᎰᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂShade ᎤᏅᏬᏛᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏍᏛᎩᎢ ᎠᎹᏱ ᏓᏂᏂᏱᎰᎢ. “ᎭᏢᏊ ᏗᏩᏛᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᏁᏙᎲᎢ ᏫᏣᎷᎯᏍᏗ. ᎥᏝ ᏂᎯ ᎮᏙᎲᎢ ᏱᎬᏂᎷᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

LarryZ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏭᏂᎪᏛᎢ ᏴᏫ “ᏓᏂᏌᏛᏍᎪᎢ” ᎾᎯᏳ ᎤᏒᎢ “chum” ᏭᎾᏕᎪᎢ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ Ꮎ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᏌᏛᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎠᏣᏗᏃ ᏱᏓᎩᏅᎦᎸᎯ, ᏳᏓᎵᎭ ᎥᏍᎩᎾᎾ ᏱᏩᏮᏓᎤᎦ ᎠᎹᏱ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗᏭ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ. ᎥᏝ ᏱᎦᏥᏌᏛᏍᎪᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎯᎩᏴ ᏥᎿᎾᏛᎲᎲᎢ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎰᎢ. ᎥᏝ ᏱᏥᎶᏄᎮᏍᎪᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

LarryZ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏱᏛᎦᏘᎭ, ᎾᎥᏃ ᏫᎦᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏗᏁᏙᎲᎢ ᎡᎵᎢ ᏱᎩ ᏂᏛᏍᎦᏍᏓᏁᎲᎾ ᏱᎩ, ᎾᏊᏃ ᏗᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎦᏘᏍᏗ ᎬᏗ ᎦᏚᎢᏗᏜ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎠᏰᎸᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎦᏂᏓᏛᎢ ᎦᏰᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎥᏝ ᏱᏣᏚᎵᎠ ᏣᏲᏍᏙᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏱᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏗᏯ ᎾᎯᏳ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏱᏙᏲᎭ ᎠᏎᎢ ᎢᎦᎯ ᎠᏨᏍᏗ ᎠᏫᏗ ᏰᎵᏊ ᎠᎹᏱ ᎭᏫᎾ ᏫᏗᎬᏩᎸᏌᏓᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏂᏘ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎥᎿ ᎬᏩᏕᏱᏓ ᎥᏙᎲᎢ.

Cleaning and cooking

ᎣᏍᏓᏃ ᏱᎦᎢ ᏱᏗᎦᏂᏴᎯ, LarryᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏓᏂᏅᎦᎵᏍᎪᎢ Ꮎ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ, ᎥᎿᎿ ᎠᎹᏳᏟᏗ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᎯᏗᏭ ᎨᏐᎢ.

“ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎲᎢ ᏱᏙᎩᏅᎦᎸ ᎦᏚᎢ ᏗᏜ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏌᎾᎩᏍᏗ ᎦᎸᏓᎬᏘ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏅᎦᏟᏗ ᏱᏗᎬᏓᎡᏗ ᏚᎩᏧᎸᎢ. ᎠᎴ ᎣᏂᏗᏢ ᏗᏜ ᎦᏂᏓᏛᎢ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᏥᏍᎦᏢᎢ ᏱᎬᏂᏕᏍᏗ. ᎤᎩᏧᎸᏃ ᏅᎬᏂᏕᎠ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎾᏛᏁᎳ. ᏭᎪᏛᏃ ᎨᏒ ᏙᏥᎳᏕᏍᎪᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᎩᏍᏗ ᎨᎰᎢ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏜ ᏗᏜ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎬᏂᏍᏔᏂ ᎠᎴ ᏲᏥᏲᏍᏓ ᎦᏂᏓᏛᎢ ᏗᏜ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏲᏥᎦ ᎭᏫᏯ ᎥᎿ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏯᏍᎦᏢᎢ ᎭᏫᏂ.”

ᏲᎩᏍᏆᏓ ᏙᏥᏅᎦᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᏙᏨᏩᏢᏍᎪᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎤᏗᏞᎩ ᎠᎼᎢ ᏍᏗ ᎠᎹ ᏚᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᎦᏗᎢ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏲᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏫᏛᎬᏂᏍᏗᎲᎢ ᏱᎪᎯᏓ.

ᎢᏳᏃ ᎠᏂShade ᏂᏚᏅᏂᏍᏔᏅᎾ ᏱᎩ ᎾᎯᏳ ᎤᏒᎢ, LarryᏃ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏳᏓᎵᎭ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᏕᎦᏟᏗᎢ ᏱᏕᎦᎸᎠ ᎠᎹᏃ ᏯᏟᏍᏗ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᏕᎦᎸᎢ ᎠᏗᏙᏗᏃ ᏥᏚᏍᏗᎧ ᏯᎧᎵᏣ ᎠᎹ ᏱᏕᎫᎵᏍᏓ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏁᏍᏓᎳᏗᏍᎩ ᏱᏕᎦᎸᎠ.

ᎾᏊᏃ ᏳᏟᎠᎶᏝ ᏗᎬᏂᏍᏙᏗᎢ, Larry ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᏝ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏄᏓᎴᎢ ᏳᏑᏯᏃᎢ, ᎠᏑᏴᏙᏗᏊ ᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏌᎷᎢᏌ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏍᏗᏃ ᎠᎹ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏆᏲᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏍᏗᏭ ᏎᎷᎢᏌ ᏗᎦᏅᎵᏰᏗ ᏥᏍᏛᎾ.

“ ᏍᏗᏃ ᎠᎹ ᎠᎴ ᏍᏗ ᏗᏆᏲᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎿᏊ ᏍᏗ ᏎᎷᎢᏌ ᎠᎴ ᏱᏛᎬᏣᏢᎦ,” “ᎠᏊᏂᏔ ᎥᏝ ᏙᏳᎢ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎩ ᏗᎬᏣᏢᏅᎢ ᏱᎩ, ᎠᏎᏅ ᎥᏍᎩᏭ ᏂᎦᏲᏣᏛᏁᎰᎢ ᏙᏦᎦᏛᏒᎢ.”

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