Sisters who survived Trail of Tears honored

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
11/19/2015 08:00 AM
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Wesley Harris, of Heber Springs, Arkansas, reads the biography of his great-great-grandmother Arminda England during a Nov. 14 ceremony at the Schrimsher Cemetery northwest of Vinita, Oklahoma. England traveled and survived the Trail of Tears with her parents when she was 7. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
The Oklahoma Trail of Tears Association placed a bronze plaque on Arminda England Schrimsher Jenkins’ grave that reads: “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-39. The Trail of Tears Association Oklahoma Chapter.” The plaques also include the TOTA and Cherokee Nation seals. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Main Cherokee Phoenix
Arminda England Schrimsher Jenkins around age 20. COURTESY
Main Cherokee Phoenix
People arrive on Nov. 14 to the Schrimsher Cemetery near Vinita, Oklahoma, for a ceremony to honor Trail of Tears survivors Irene and Arminda England, who along with their family, were forcibly removed from western North Carolina in 1838 and settled in Indian Territory in 1839. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
VINITA, Okla. – Until recently, the Schrimsher Cemetery, about 6 miles northwest of Vinita, was forgotten and overgrown with trees and grass. Today it has a new fence surrounding and protecting it from cattle, and the trees and tall grass have been cut away.

On Nov. 14, the descendants of Arminda and Irene England, who are buried in the cemetery, gathered there with Oklahoma Trail of Tears Association members to honor the two Cherokee women. As children they traveled the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory with the Richard Taylor detachment.

The detachment left near Ross’s Landing on the Tennessee River on Sept. 20, 1838, with 1,029 people and arrived near what is now Westville on March 24, 1839. It had 55 deaths and 15 births during the journey.

Arminda England descendant Wesley Harris, of Heber Springs, Arkansas, said he saw a Cherokee Phoenix article several years ago about a grave marking by the Oklahoma TOTA and inquired about getting his great-great-grandmother’s grave marked.

He said he’s worked with Oklahoma TOTA President Curtis Rohr to get the grave marked. He sent Rohr his genealogy to show how he was related to Arminda, and the association’s genealogist, David Hampton, researched Harris’ genealogy to verify the connection.

“Arminda was 7 years old during the Trail of Tears, and they (her family) settled on Honey Creek near Grove,” Harris said. “It’s very humbling to realize what they had to go through – as a 7-year-old girl in the winter time having to go that far. It they hadn’t done it we wouldn’t be here today, and it’s part of my history, and I’m very proud of it. I’ve always been proud of it ever since I was a little fella and my parents would tell us stories about it.”

He said the event allowed the two sisters’ descendants to meet at a luncheon before the ceremony. Harris said he met his cousin Carol Wright, of Tulsa, for the first time that day.

Wright is the great-great-great-granddaughter of Irene England, who traveled the Trail of Tears at age 10.

Wright said she felt “honored” to be a part of the ceremony to honor her grandmother. Wright credits her husband Phil for providing her with her genealogy and letting her know of her relations.

“I find it very interesting to find that these people are important enough to be remembered for what they’ve done because when we went to Schrimsher Cemetery it was this (waist) high in grass. So, it’s nice to know this has made a difference and the cemetery’s being taken care of now,” she said.

Harris said the owner of the land where the cemetery sits, and his family, removed fallen trees and saplings and mowed the grass. A wrought iron fence was also placed around the cemetery to keep out cattle.

Troy Wayne Poteete, executive director of the National Trail of Tears Association and CN Supreme Court chief justice, said every time the TOTA marks the grave of a Trial of Tears survivor it’s an opportunity for it to tell the larger Cherokee story, which includes the story of the two sisters.

“It’s a story of survival, of resilience, of tenacity. That’s what we celebrate. We celebrate that they overcame, that they rebuilt the Cherokee Nation and they handed it off to the next generation – a distinct political entity, a distinct cultural entity, a Cherokee Nation that could hold its own and retain its identity,” Poteete said. “That’s why we do this. That why we are here today, to commemorate their tenacity, their resilience, their sheer will to carry on as a people.”

Irene was born in 1828 in the old CN, probably on the Tusquittee Creek in what is now Clay County, North Carolina, where her family ran a mill. Her father was a white man named David England and her mother was a half-blood Cherokee named Susannah Fields. Arminda was born three years later on Nov. 25, 1831.

During the forced removal, David England supplied a horse team for the detachment. Following the Trail of Tears, the family settled on Honey Creek. Later the family moved to the Big Cabin Creek area north of what is now Vinita.

In 1847, Arminda married William England, son of Susannah Ward and William England, and they had one daughter, Mary Jane. After their separation, Arminda married Isaac Schrimsher and they were the parents of four daughters: Alta Berilla Meek, Arabella Southerland, Saphronia Susan Mayne Rogers Nolen and Ruth Ann Tyler. After the start of the Civil War, Cherokees supporting the Union killed Isaac.

“A group of Cherokees who were sympathetic to the north came down and killed her husband and his slave, beat her with his scalp for marrying a white man, took all the cattle and horses, and left her there with the bodies of her dead husband and slave. She had to walk 20 miles to where her father lived, and he came back and buried the husband and the slave,” Harris said. “After that she married Elias Jenkins (in 1867), who is my line and where I’m from.”

The Jenkins farmed on Big Cabin Creek and had two children: Ida Josephine Harris and Henry Washington Jenkins. Arminda Jenkins died, probably at her home near Vinita, on Dec. 27, 1879, and was buried in the Schrimsher Cemetery.

About 1853, Irene married Edward Lee Schrimsher. After the Civil War the family farmed north of present-day Vinita in the Cooweescoowee District. Irene and Edward were the parents of four children who lived to adulthood: William Schrimsher, Eliza Ann Williamson, Laura Kelly and Margaret Ann Tanner. In addition they had five children who died in childhood. Irene died probably at her home north of Vinita, on Oct. 9, 1882, and was buried in the Schrimsher Cemetery.

Bronze TOTA plaques were placed on the women’s graves that read: “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-39. The Trail of Tears Association Oklahoma Chapter.” The plaques also include the TOTA and CN seals.

“It was such an honor to have the Cherokee Nation and the Trail Of Tears Association recognize two ordinary citizens who endured the forced march. My relatives and I feel this project is important because it keeps alive in people’s minds our history and how so many suffered,” Harris said.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ. - ᎾᏞᎬᏭ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ Schimsher ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗᎢ, ᎢᎸᏂᏢᏃ 6 ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎤᏕᎵᎬᎢ ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ ᎠᏂᎩᏓ, ᎥᎿᎾᏃ ᎤᏅᎨᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏜᏴᏒᎢ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏕᏡᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏒᎸᏒᎢ. ᎪᎯᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎢᏤᎢ ᎠᏐᏯ ᎠᎴ ᏩᎦ ᎥᏝ ᏱᎬᏂᏴᎭ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᏡᎬᏃ ᏚᏃᏅᎢ ᎤᏜᏴᏒᏃ ᎦᏒᎸᎯ ᎤᏂᎦᎵᏒᎢ.

ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᏅᏓᏕᏆ.14 ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ Arminda ᎠᎴ Irene England ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏓᎴᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏕᎦᏂᏌᎲ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ, ᎤᎾᏓᏟᏌᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏁᎸᎢ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ Trail of tears Association ᎠᏁᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏂᎸᏉᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ. ᏗᏂᏲᏟᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᏁᎸᏃ ᏥᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏴᏫᏯᏍᏛᎢ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎤᏂᎷᏤᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Richard Taylor ᏓᏘᏁᎲᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᏂᎩᏒᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎾᎥᎢ ᎫᏫᏍᎫᏫ ᏧᏂᏐᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏔᏂᏏᎢ ᎡᏉᏂ ᎤᏪᏴᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᏚᎵᏍᏗ. 20, 1838, ᎾᏍᎩ 1,029 ᎢᏳᏂᏨᎢ ᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᎸᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎷᏨᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎠᏅᏱ 24, 1839 ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎪᎯᏴᎢ ᏥᎩ ᎢᎪᏗᎢ ᎠᏃᏎᎰᎢ. 55 ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᏚᏂᏲᎱᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ 15 ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᏚᎾᏕᏅᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏗᏁᎬᎢ.

Arminda England ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎢ Wesley Harris, ᎥᎿᎾᏂ Heber Springs, ᏚᏯᏓᏛᎢ, ᎡᎯ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎸᏍᎩ ᎾᏕᏘ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᎪᎲᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎴᎯᏌᏅᎢ ᏗᎦᎴᏴᏔᏅᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎪᏪᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎪᏪᎸᏃ ᏕᎦᏂᏌᎲᎢ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏓᏅᏁᎲᎢ ᎭᏢᎢᏴ ᎤᎾᏣᏪᏐᎸᏍᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ TOTA ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎵᎠ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎦᏛᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏱᎬᏩᏅᏁᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏦᎢ ᏳᎵᏏ ᎦᏂᏌᎲᎢ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ TOTA ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒᎢ Curtis Rohr ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏳᏅᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᏤᎵᏍᏛᎢ.

Rohr ᏃᏫᏓᏥᏅᏁᎴᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎬᏁᎯ ᎪᎱᏍᏗᏃ ᎤᏮᏂ ᎨᏒᎢ Arminda, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᎦᏛᏂᏙᎯ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ, David Hampton, ᏃᎤᎦᏛᏂᏙᎸᎢ Harris’ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏬᎯᏳᏙᏗ ᏙᎯᏳᎯᏯᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏮᎾ ᏱᎩ.

“Arminda 7 ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᏗᎨᎦᏂᎩᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ (ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ) ᏧᏁᏅᏒᎢ ᎤᏃ,ᏅᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ Honey Creek ᏧᏍᏕᏄᎲᎢ ᎾᎥᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Harris. “ᎤᏲᎢᏳ ᎠᏓᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᏯᏓᏅᏖᏝ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏂᎦᏛᎴᏒᎢ- ᎾᏍᎩ 7 ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ ᎥᏍᎩ ᏱᎾ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎪᎳᏃ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᎢᏳᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸᎾ ᏱᎩ ᎥᏝ ᏱᎬᏁᏙᎠ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎪᎯᏴᏥᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᎬᎧᏃᎮᏗ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏦᎦᏓᎴᏅᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎠᎩᏰᎸᏐᎢ. ᏥᏧᏣᏃ ᏂᏗᎬᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎾᎩᏰᎸᏐᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎩᎬᏴᎵᎨᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ.”

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎯᎠ ᏥᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᎭ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᏟᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎠᎾᏓᎸᎢ’ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗᎢ ᎠᏏ ᏄᎾᎴᏅᏓ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ.

Harris ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ Carol Wright ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏮᏂ ᎤᏩᏛᎲᎢ Tulsa ᎡᎯ ᎩᎳ ᎢᎬᏱᏱᎢ ᏓᎾᏓᎪᏩᏘᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎢᎪᎯ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ.

Wright Z Irene England ᏦᎢ ᏳᎵᏏ, ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ 10 ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏪᎵᏕᎢ ᏥᏗᎨᎦᏂᎩᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

Wright Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ “ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎬᎢ” ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏪᎳᏗᏍᏗ ᏥᎩ ᎠᏂᎸᏉᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎵᏏ. Wright Z ᎠᎵᎮᎵᏤᎰᎢ ᎠᏂᏁᎵ Phil ᎤᏛᏅᏍᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᏍᎩ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᎯᏎᎲᎢ ᎦᎪ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏧᏮᎾ.

“ᏙᏳᎢ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎦᏘ ᏥᏰᎸᏍᎪᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭ ᏄᎾᎵᏍᎨᏗᏴᎢ ᎨᎦᏅᏛᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏦᎨᏅᏒᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ Schrimsher ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ (waist) ᏂᎦᏛᎢ ᎦᏄᎸᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏅ, ᎣᏌᏂᏳᏃ ᏄᏓᎴᎢ ᏥᏄᎵᏍᏔᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏛᎢ ᎾᏊ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Harris Z ᎠᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏤᎵᎪᎯ ᏥᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏥᏧᏙᏢᎭ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ, ᏚᏂᎲᏒᎢ ᏧᎴᏴᏒᎢ ᏕᏡᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏓᎨᎢ ᏕᏡᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏄᎸᎢ ᎤᏂᎦᎵᏒᎢ. ᏔᎷᎩᏍᎩ ᎤᏐᏯᎸᎢ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ ᎤᏂᏴᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏩᎦ.

Troy Wayne Poteete, ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏌᏕᎩ ᎠᏍᎦᏰᎬᏍᏗ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎢᎬᎾᏕᎾ Trail of Tears Association ᎠᎴ CN ᎤᏔᎾ ᏧᎾᏓᎯᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏌᏕᎩ ᎦᎧᎿᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᏗᏃᏢᏍᎩ, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ Ꮎ TOTA ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏱᏄᏅᏁᎳ ᏥᏛᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᏪᎳᏛ ᎦᏂᏌᎲᎢ ᎾᏊᏃ ᎠᎵᏍᏚᎢᏍᎪᎢ ᏗᎬᎧᏃᎮᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎾᏠᏯᏍᏓ ᎯᎢᎾ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎠᎾᏓᎸᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎧᏃᎮᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏂᎦᏛᎴᏒᎢ, ᏚᎾᎴᏂᏌᏅᎢ, ᎬᏩᎵᏨᎢ ᎦᏁᏟᏴᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏥᎩ ᎢᏗᎸᏉᏗᎭ. ᎢᏗᎸᏉᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏛᎴᏏᏙᎸᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏃᏢᎯᏌᏅᎢ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏚᏂᏁᎳ ᎣᏂ ᎠᏁᎯ- ᎤᎾᏓᎴᎿᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎤᎾᏤᏟᏓ, ᎤᏓᎴᎿᎢ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏤᏟᏓ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎦᏙᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎬᏩᏍᏙᎢ ᎠᎪᏟᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Poteete. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᎤᏰᏟᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏥᏃᏣᏛᏁᎰᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏦᏤᎭ ᎪᎯᏴᎢ ᏥᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᎦᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᎦᏁᏟᏴᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ, ᏚᎾᎴᎯᏌᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎾᏟᎬᎬᎢ ᏂᎬᏂᎯᏒᏊ.”

Irene Ꮓ 1828 ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ, Tusquittee Creek ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎪᎯᏴ ᏥᎩ Clay County ,
North Carolina, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏎᎷ ᎤᏂᏍᏙᏍᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏒᎢ. ᎤᏙᏓᏃ ᎠᏴᏩᏁᎦ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ David England ᏚᏙᎥᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏥᎢ ᎤᎬᎭᏟ-ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ Susannah Fields ᏚᏙᎥᎢ. Arminda Z ᏦᎢ ᎢᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎣᏂ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ ᏚᏂᏃᏗ. 25, ᎧᎸᎢ 1831.

ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᏥᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏗᎲᎢ, David England Z ᏐᏈᎵ ᏚᎵᏍᎪᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᏂᏣᏘ ᏥᎨᎦᏬᎣᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ Honey Creek ᎤᏂᎷᏨᎢ. ᎤᏩᎬᏗᏗᏒᏃ ᎤᎾᏛᏅᏒᎢ Big Cabion Creek ᏭᏂᎷᏨᎢ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᏗᏜ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ ᎪᏎᏗ ᎪᎯᏴ ᏥᎩ.

ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ 1847, Arminda ᎠᎴ William England ᏕᎨᎦᏨᏍᏔᏅᎢ, Susanna Ward ᎠᎴ William England ᎤᏁᏥ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏅᎩ ᎾᏂᎥᎢ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ: Alta Berilla Meek, Arabella Southerland, Saphronia Susan Mayne Rogers Nolen ᎠᎴ Ruth Ann Tyler. ᎾᎯᏳᏃ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎦᎾᏩ ᏓᎿᏩ ᏣᎾᏟᎲᎢ, ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᎫᏍᏓᎢ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎤᏂᏞᎢ Isaac.

“ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩᏃ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ ᏚᎾᎵᎬᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎤᏂᎷᏨᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏞᎢ ᎤᏰᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏥᏅᏏᏓᏍᏗ, ᎤᏍᎫᏓᏁᎦᎸᏅᏃ ᎬᏗ ᎠᏥᎸᏅᏍᏙᏔᏁᎢ ᎠᎨᏯ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎠᏴᏩᏁᎦ ᎤᏯᏅᎲᎢ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ, ᏂᎦᏓᏃ ᏩᎦ ᎠᎴ ᏐᏈᎵ ᏚᏘᎾᏫᏛᎲᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏥᏃᎯᏴᎢ ᎠᎨᏯ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏧᏂᏲᎱᏒᎢ ᏄᎾᏛᏅᎢ ᎤᏰᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏥᏅᏏᏓᏍᏗ. 20 ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎢᏳᏓᏅᎯᏓ ᎤᏂᎩᏎᎢ ᎤᏙᏓᏃ ᏤᎲᎢ ᏭᎷᏤᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏙᏓ ᏭᎷᏤᎢ ᏫᏚᏂᏌᏁᎢ ᎠᎨᏯ ᎤᏰᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏅᏏᏓᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Harris. “ᎣᏂᏃ ᎢᏴᏱ Elisa Jenkins ᏙᎨᎦᏨᏍᏔᏅᎢ (ᎾᎯᏳᎢ 1867 ᏥᎨᏒᎢ), ᎾᏍᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏅᏓᏆᏓᎴᏅᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏍᎩᏂ ᎠᏂ Jenkins ᏗᏂᎶᎩᏍᎩ ᎥᎨᏒᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ Big Cabin Creek ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᏚᎾᏓᏘᎿᎥᎢ: Ida Josephine Harris ᎠᎴ Henry Washington Jenkins. Arminda Jenkins Ꮓ ᎤᏲᎱᏒᎢ, ᏧᏪᏅᏒᎢ ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ, ᎾᎥᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎥᏍᎩᏱ. 27,1879, ᎠᎴ Schrimsher ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗᎢ ᎤᏂᏂᏌᏅᎢ.

ᎾᎥᏃ 1853, Irene Edward Lee Schrimsher ᏕᎨᎦᏨᏍᏔᏅᎢ. ᎤᏴᏢᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎦᏅᏮᎢ ᎤᎾᏟᎶᎿ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏏᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᏓᏂᎶᎩᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᏗᏜ ᎠᏂᎩᏓ ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎫᏫᏍᎫᏫ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ. Irene ᎠᎴ Edward ᎤᎾᏓᎬᏴᎵᎨ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏅᎩᏃ ᏚᎾᏓᏘᎿᎥᎢ ᏧᎾᏔᎾ ᏳᎾᎵᏍᏛᏅᎢ: William Schrimsher, Eliza Ann Williason, Laura Kelly ᎠᎴ Margret Tanner. ᎯᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᏚᎾᏓᏘᎿᎥᎢ ᏚᏂᏲᎱᏌ. Irene Ꮓ ᎤᏲᎱᏒᎢ ᏧᏪᏅᏒᎢ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᏗᏜ ᎠᏂᎩᏓ ᏙᏧᏓᏝᎥᎢ, ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ, ᏅᏓᏕᏆ.9,1882, ᎠᎴ Schrimsher ᏧᎾᏓᏂᏐᏗ ᎤᏂᏂᏌᏅᎢ.

ᎥᏣᏱ TOTA ᏧᏃᏪᎳᏅᎢ ᏂᏚᏅᏁᎸᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏕᎨᏥᏂᏌᎲᎢ: “ᏓᎾᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᎦᏛᎴᏒᎢ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ 1838-1839. ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮎ Trail of Tears Association Oklahoma Chapter.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏧᏃᏪᎳᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏓ Ꮎ TOTA ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏂᎲᎢ ᎨᎪᎵᏍᏙᏗ.

“ᎢᏙᏳᏃ ᎣᏌᏂᏳ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎴ the Trail of Tears Association ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏧᏅᏁᏗᎢ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎤᏓᏤᏟᏓ ᎠᏁᎳ ᏥᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ. ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏗᏋᎾ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏛᎢ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏗᏳᏃ ᎯᎠ ᏥᎾᏅᏛᏁᎰᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏣᏁᎰᏭ ᏂᎬᏫᏍᏙᎢ ᏱᏓᏓᏅᏖᏝ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏯᏂ ᎤᏂᎩᏟᏲᏨᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Harris.

About the Author
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. 

For many years h ...
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will Chavez is a Cherokee/San Felipe Pueblo Indian who has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 25 years. During that time he has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a writer, reporter and photographer for the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers. For many years h ...

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/30/2020 04:01 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma State Department of Health’s data on its website showed...

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/30/2020 08:55 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Early in-person voting began...

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
10/30/2020 08:53 AM
The India Strong 21 Foundation is working to bring a...

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/29/2020 04:56 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma State Department of Health’s data on its website showed ...

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
10/29/2020 10:42 AM
In the fall, kanuchi is ...

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/28/2020 02:33 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma State Department of Health’s data on its website showed ...