Potter receives Indian College Student of the Year award

Breanna Potter, a Cherokee Nation citizen from Sequoyah County, receives the Indian College Student of the Year award from the Oklahoma Council for Indian Education. COURTESY

AKINS, Okla. -- Breanna Potter, a 21-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen from Sequoyah County, was recently awarded the Indian College Student of the Year award from the Oklahoma Council for Indian Education.

Potter is a senior at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah pursuing a degree in special education mild/moderate disabilities. She said her passion in life is Native youth and believes that education will change the world.

"To me, this honor stands as proof to other Indian students that they are capable of obtaining an education and accomplishing what they desire to," she said. "It represents all the hard work that others have poured into me as a young woman. As someone who desires to make a difference for Native youth in education, I hope to use this award to help motivate other youth in my community to pursue their education."

She said she has raised $80,000 in cash and in-kind grants and serves as a youth ambassador for President Obama's Generation Indigenous. She is the former president of the Cherokee Promise Scholars at NSU and was a part of the program for the past 3-1/2 years. She has also volunteered and served as a leader for the Cherokee Promise Scholar Program and the National Native Youth Network in Washington, D.C. She also spends time volunteering for the Native American Student Association and American Indian Science and Engineering Society.

She has also received accolades from the Rho Theta Sigma honor society.

Potter said she works to "blend traditional culture into her lessons and is fully dedicated to changing the lives of special needs students."

Potter is the program director for the Brushy Youth Dream Team and the youth activities coordinator for the Brushy Cherokee Action Association. She was a recipient of the "Dreamstarter" grant earlier this year and was among the first the first class of American Indian youths to receive the grant.

The grant is designed to bring to life the dreams of American Indian youths under the age of 30.

She said in her "Dreamstarter" application she explained that her "dream" or project was for her community group, the Brushy Cherokee Action Association. The grant was for $10,000.

To read more on that story visit http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Article/index/9528.